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HER Number:MDV6650
Name:Heath Stone 260 metres south-west of Metherall

Summary

The Heath Stone was once a boundary stone or way marker and is first documented as Langstone or Yessetone in the 13th century. However, the stone marked as the Heath Stone on modern mapping is in an unlikely location for a guide stone. The inscription is modern.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 671 837
Map Sheet:SX68SE
Admin AreaDartmoor National Park
Civil ParishChagford
DistrictWest Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishCHAGFORD

Protected Status: none recorded

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX68SE/78

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • STANDING STONE (XII to XIX - 1200 AD to 1889 AD)

Full description

Ordnance Survey, 1880 - 1899, First Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch map (Cartographic). SDV336179.

Stone not marked.


Ordnance Survey, 1904 - 1906, Second Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map (Cartographic). SDV325644.

Heath Stone marked in antique writing.


The Royal Commission on the Historic Monuments of England Aerial Photograph Unit, 1985, The Royal Commission on the Historic Monuments of England Aerial Photograph Project (Interpretation). SDV340940.

Not visible on Royal Air Force or National Monuments Record aerial photos.


Butler, J., 1991, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities: Volume Two - The North, 32-33, Map 25 (Monograph). SDV219155.

The Heath Stone, now distinguished by a Biblical inscription cut into one face in 1970, is the largest in the moorside wall of a prehistoric field. The original Heath Stone appears to be that referred to in the 'Perambulation of the Forest of Dartmoor' in 1240 when it was known locally as Langstone or Yessetone. The name Hethstone first occurs in a later perambulation of 1608. It is marked on Ogilbys road atlas of 1675 near the summit of the ridge, just over a mile from the bridge and is also shown on later road maps. Butler considers that the siting of the present Heath Stone makes it an unlikely guide stone, the standing stone at the upper end of the stone row near the top of Hurstone ridge being a more likely candidate.


Ordnance Survey, 2013, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV350786.

Heath Stone marked. Map object based on this source.


Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, Unknown, SX68SE42 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV256620.

Sources / Further Reading

  • Monograph: Butler, J.. 1991. Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities: Volume Two - The North. Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities: Volume Two - The North. Two. Paperback Volume. 32-33, Map 25.
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. Unknown. SX68SE42. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
  • Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1904 - 1906. Second Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Second Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Map (Digital).
  • Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1880 - 1899. First Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch map. First Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Map (Digital).
  • Interpretation: The Royal Commission on the Historic Monuments of England Aerial Photograph Unit. 1985. The Royal Commission on the Historic Monuments of England Aerial Photograph Project. The Royal Commission on the Historic Monuments of England Aerial Photograph Project. Map (Paper).
  • Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2013. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital.

Associated Monuments: none recorded

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:Dec 13 2016 12:05PM