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HER Number:MDV8778
Name:Grimspound enclosed settlement, Manaton

Summary

Prehistoric enclosed settlement with a substantial granite surrounding wall, containing 24 hut circles, as well as several ‘pens’ built into the enclosure wall, positioned in a valley between Hookney Tor and Hameldon. First planned by A. C. Shillibeer in 1829, this site was excavated by the Dartmoor Exploration Committee in 1894-5. Within the guardianship area managed by Dartmoor National Park Authority.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 699 808
Map Sheet:SX68SE
Admin AreaDartmoor National Park
Civil ParishManaton
DistrictTeignbridge
Ecclesiastical ParishMANATON

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX78SW/49
  • Old SAM County Ref: 142
  • Old SAM Ref: 22212(P)

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • HUT CIRCLE SETTLEMENT (Bronze Age - 2200 BC to 701 BC (Between))

Full description

NMR, SX7080 (Aerial Photograph). SDV304194.


Polwhele, R., 1793 - 1806, The History of Devonshire, 151 (Monograph). SDV21030.


Jones, J. P., 1823, Observations on the Scenery and Antiquities in the Neighbourhood of Moretonhampstead (Monograph). SDV344934.


Shillibeer, A. C., 1829, Untitled Source (Plan - sketch). SDV304200.


Rowe, S., 1830, 'Antiquarian Investigations of the Forest of Dartmoor' (Article in Serial). SDV344933.

Other details: 194-5.


Wilkinson, J. G., 1861, On Ancient British Walls (Article in Serial). SDV304172.

Other details: 5.


Wilkinson, J. G., 1862, On British Remains on Dartmoor, 117-119 (Article in Serial). SDV277122.

Other details: Plate 2.


Ormerod, G. W., 1864, On the Hut Circles on the Eastern Side of Dartmoor, 305 (Article in Serial). SDV304174.

Ormerod discussed possible purposes of Grimspound. Cites Polwhele, who asserts that the site was for ritual purposes, probably one of the principal temples of the Druids. Also cites Rowe, who considers it constructed as a fortified settlement, and refers to the outer wall as a rampart. Concludes that it was built as a pound for cattle for protection against wolves and bands of robbers.


Ormerod, G. W., 1872, What is Grimspound?, 41-46 (Article in Serial). SDV304207.


Baring Gould, S., 1894, 1st Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee: The Exploration of Grimspound, 101-121 (Article in Serial). SDV304196.

Detailed description of the excavation work undertaken at Grimspound in 1894, including detail of individual huts excavated, sketches and plan of the site, as well as early references to Grimspound.


Baring Gould, S., 1895, Second Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee, 82-3 (Article in Serial). SDV271711.

Further investigative works undertaken on the enclosure wall at Grimspound, briefly recorded here. It was ascertained that the enclosure wall is unlikely to have been intended to be defensive and is more likely to represent an enclosure for cattle.


Rowe, S., 1896, Perambulation of the Forest of Dartmoor, 55 (Monograph). SDV249697.


Burnard, R., 1906, Early Man, 350-352 (Article in Serial). SDV322231.

Other details: Plan.


Allcroft, A. H., 1908, Earthwork of England, 177-178, 219-224 (Monograph). SDV11975.

Other details: Plan.


Adams, M. + Burnard, R., 1913, Proceedings at the Annual Meeting, 37-38 (Article in Serial). SDV304211.


Lowe, H. J., 1915-1920, The Dartmoor Antiquities and their Builders, 133 (Article in Serial). SDV231169.

Nothing to add.


Watkin, H. R., 1918-1919, The Etymology of Grimspound, 291-292 (Article in Serial). SDV304175.

The etymology of the name Grimspound is discussed. The author suggests that it is derived from the Anglo-Saxon words meaning a witches enclosure. Other details: Part 1.


Chanter, J. F., 1927, Grimspound, 87-88 (Article in Serial). SDV304173.

Site has not been pillaged. Hardly a stone removed. Some of the huts may have been occupied at a later date by tin streamers. Very little evidence of prolonged occupancy. It served as a place of refuge for the tribe and cattle during any raid. Other details: Fig.


Chanter, J. F., 1927, Proceedings of the Congress of the British Archaeological Association at Exeter, 20 (Article in Serial). SDV304205.


Gover, J. E. B. + Mawer, A. + Stenton, F. M., 1931, The Place-Names of Devon: Part One, 482 (Monograph). SDV1312.


Brailsford, J. W., 1938, Bronze Age Stone Monuments of Dartmoor, 453 (Article in Serial). SDV304210.


Royal Air Force, 1946, CPE/UK/1824, 3041 (Aerial Photograph). SDV288056.


Worth, R. H., 1953, Dartmoor (Monograph). SDV231148.


Fox, A., 1954, Excavations at Kestor, 46 (Article in Serial). SDV304231.


Fox, A., 1957, The Prehistoric Monuments of Dartmoor, 158-159 (Article in Serial). SDV304214.


Fox, A., 1958, Twenty-Fourth Report on the Archaeology and Early History of Devon (Article in Serial). SDV341823.

Other details: 90, 219.


Cambridge University Collection, 1962, DAP/AFH, 6-8 (Aerial Photograph). SDV304221.


Cambridge University, 1966, CUC/ANM, 33-37 (Aerial Photograph). SDV62341.


Grinsell, L. V., 1970, Discovering Regional Archaeology: South Western England, 25 (Monograph). SDV304192.


Barber, J., 1972, 33rd report on archaeology and early history (Article in Serial). SDV338737.

Other details: 236 and Fig 3.


Fox, A., 1973, South West England 3,500BC - AD600 (Revised Edition), 103 (Monograph). SDV16216.

Other details: Revised Edition.


Grinsell, L. V., 1976, Folklore of Prehistoric Sites in Britain, 96 (Monograph). SDV304171.

Named from the heathen 'Grim' which can mean the devil, woden or any goblin or spectre.


Grinsell, L. V., 1977, Grimspound (Personal Comment). SDV342019.

A stream runs through the site. This is the best known and most accessible of the prehistoric settlements on Dartmoor. It lies in a valley between Hookney Tor and Hameldon and contains some 24 circular huts of which about 16 were probably dwellings, the rest store huts. These huts vary in size quite considerably, and all except the store huts have hearths. A massive stone pound wall surrounds the settlements. There is a strong stone-built entrance on the south side facing uphill to Hameldon. All the other entrance gaps are modern. Good condition.


NMR, 1977, SX7080/4 (Aerial Photograph). SDV304216.


Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, 1985, Aerial Photograph Project (Interpretation). SDV319854.

Grimspound covers about 4 acres and contains the remains of 24 hut circles some of which have been excavated and well restored. Half of the huts showed signs of human habitation; they had hearths and their floors were strewn with charcoal. Visible and recorded.


Griffith, F. M., 1986, DAP/HP, 7 (Aerial Photograph). SDV304235.


Griffith, F. M., 1988, DAP/KM, 1-2 (Aerial Photograph). SDV242441.


Griffith, F. M., 1988, Devon's Past. An Aerial View, 37 (Monograph). SDV64198.

Some of the hut circles within the enclosure were excavated in 1894-5 as the very first project of the Devonshire Association's Dartmoor Exploration Committee. Although no pottery was found, flint and stone artefacts were recovered from the floors of the round houses. In spite of the absence of pottery reported by the excavators, Grimspound appears to belong in the same general date-range as other enclosed Dartmoor settlements, perhaps having its origins in the earlier second millennium BC. Since 1966 (when the published photograph was taken) this monument has been subjected to a considerable amount of erosion through the sheer number of visitors it receives each year. A modern photograph would show significantly more bare areas where vegetation has been worn away by the feet of walkers.


Fleming, A., 1988, The Dartmoor Reaves: Investigating Prehistoric Land Divisions (Monograph). SDV229071.


Griffith, F. M., 1989, DAP/OW, 18 (Aerial Photograph). SDV304237.


Pattison, P., 1991, A Survey of Grimspound, Manaton Parish, Devon (Report - Survey). SDV304224.

Survey by the Royal Commission for Historical Monuments in England (for main detail see monument record 6641).


Butler, J., 1991, Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities: Volume One - The East, 143-145 (Monograph). SDV299725.

Prehistoric settlement largely undisturbed excavated by the Dartmoor Exploration Committee in 1894 and 1895. Enclosure probably occupied in the centuries around 1300 BC.


Dartmoor National Park Authority, 1993 - 2003, Untitled Source (Ground Photograph). SDV344953.

Ground photographs from site visits between 1993 and 2003.


Griffith, F. M., 1994, DAP/XJ, 13, 14 (Aerial Photograph). SDV319180.


Pattison, P. + Fletcher, M., 1994, Grimspound, One Hundred Years On, 21-34 (Article in Serial). SDV304179.


Ancient Monuments, 1995, Grimspound (Site Visit). SDV304184.

Immediately south east of the enclosure at least nine stone hut circles survive together with lengths of field boundary wall and distinct areas from which stone has been cleared. The stone hut circles within this area are all linked to rubble banks forming part of a field system. Eight of the huts are circular in shape and their interiors vary between 3.2 meters and 5.3 meters in diameter, with the average being 4.16 meters. The interior of the remaining building is oval, measures 3.0 meters long by 2.5 meters wide and is surrounded by a 1.3 meter wide wall standing up to 0.5 meters high. One hut has a visible doorway and two are conjoined. The boundary banks linking the hut circles survive as rubble banks averaging 1.2 meters wide and 0.4 meters high. Together they form at least four discrete partly enclosed areas of fields. In addition to those areas defined by the rubble banks there are a number of areas from which surface stone has been cleared, presumably to facilitate cultivation.
Field evidence for reuse of the settlement is provided by two small catches. The first is built against the inner face of the south western circuit of the enclosure wall and survives as a 1.5 meter wide and 0.4 meter high dry stone wall on three sides, the fourth side being formed by the enclosure wall. The interior of the structure is rectangular in shape and measures 1.3 meters long by 1.2 meters wide. The second cache is built within the eastern length of the enclosure wall and survives as a 1.4 meter long, 1.1 meter wide and 1.3 meter deep oval shaped hollow created by removing stones from the core of the enclosure wall. The size of these structures suggests that they were probably used for storage purposes rather than as shelters.


Department of National Heritage, 1995, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV321020.

Scheduled monument consent granted for works concerning erosion repairs.


Department of National Heritage, 1996, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV321022.

SMC granted for works concerning erosion repairs and consolidation of huts 3 + 20 (see subsheets).


Craddock, P. T. + Craddock, B. R., 1996, The Beginnings of Metallurgy in South West Britain: Hypotheses and Evidence, 52-63 (Article in Serial). SDV304190.

Grimspound may have been associated with tin working on Challacombe Down (sx68se/74). Many of the small tin workings on Dartmoor are in the vicinity of hut circles. Other details: Mining History: Bulletins PDMHS.


DCMS, 1998, Untitled Source (Correspondence). SDV304188.

Scheduled monument consent granted for works concerning erosion repairs and building stabilisation.


Griffiths, D. M., 1999, Untitled Source (Report - Survey). SDV304189.

Erosion repair to north-east section of huts 11 and 12 and between hut 3 and the east breach. Damaged turf on the north-west side of wall of hut 3 repaired, as was damage to gullies inside and outside the east breach. Gully outside south-east entrance re-dug and stone placed over a section of gully to form bridge.


DCMS, 2004, Untitled Source (Correspondence). SDV321031.

SMC granted for works concerning a five year programme of management works including erosion repairs.


Dartmoor National Park + English Heritage, 2008, Grimspound: A Prehistoric Settlement, 1-24 (Leaflet). SDV344709.

Prehistoric enclosed settlement with a substantial granite surrounding wall, containing 24 hut circles, as well as several ‘pens’ built into the enclosure wall. First planned by A. C. Shillibeer in 1829, this site was excavated by the Dartmoor Exploration Committee in 1894-5. A total of 20 round houses were excavated, 13 of which were revealed to have been used as dwellings; with hearth stones found in 11 houses and cooking pits excavated in a total of 8 houses. Excavation was extremely swift, with the average round house taking just one day to excavate. These round houses were small by Dartmoor standards, measuring between 2.4 meters and 3.5 meters in diameter. Most of the houses are concentrated in the southern and central areas of the enclosure and generally tend to have their entrances facing towards the south west. The style of construction of the houses varies; some are simple constructions of a single ring of stones placed vertically, while others consist of a double wall of granite filled with smaller stones. The house walls would have originally stood to around a meter in height and the timber-supported roofs would have been thatched with straw, heather or gorse material.
The sighting of the settlement seems to have deliberately included Grims Lake, the small stream which runs through the north of the site. Sections of the wall as well as a number of the round houses were partially reconstructed by the Dartmoor Exploration Committee following their excavations; a good example of which is round house three. The settlement was probably occupied by livestock farmers who used the surrounding area to graze their animals, perhaps seasonally during the summer months. The enclosure wall may have helped to contain and protect the livestock if necessary. An alternative interpretation of the site could indicate a ritual or social significance, due to the small-sized house, the inclusion of Grims Lake and the site’s proximity to the large summit barrows on Hamel Down.


Ordnance Survey, 2010, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV344030.

Map object based on this Source.


English Heritage, 2014, National Heritage List for England (National Heritage List for England). SDV355683.

Grimspound, a partially enclosed prehistoric settlement with field system and two post medieval caches between Hookney Tor and Hameldown Tor.
Grimspound prehistoric enclosed settlement survives well and is the most visited of all archaeological monuments on the Moor. The excavations carried out at Grimspound by the Dartmoor Exploration Committee in 1894, represent the starting point of the first concerted academic attempt to examine Dartmoor's archaeology. These excavations, however, were only partial and therefore archaeological and environmental information still survives. The stone hut circles, field system and clearance areas lying outside the enclosure survive comparatively well and form an integral part of this prehistoric settlement.
This monument includes a partly enclosed stone hut circle settlement and field system and two post-medieval caches situated below the crest of a saddle between Hameldown Tor and Hookney Tor overlooking the valley of the West Webburn River. The enclosure, which is known as Grimspound, survives as a stone and earth wall measuring between 2.5m and 3.5m wide, standing up to 1.25m high, surrounding an internal ovoid area of 1.45ha, containing at least 24 stone hut circles, several lynchets and rubble banks. The original enclosure entrance cuts through the south eastern side of the surrounding wall and survives as a 2m wide gap flanked by walls standing up to 2m high. The northern side wall is a continuous face formed by two massive edge set slabs, with a boulder balanced on top and coursed walling of smaller stones to each side of the slabs. The southern face survives as large horizontally laid slabs. The entrance was reconstructed following an excavation by the Dartmoor Exploration Committee in 1894. The ground within the entrance passage and the area immediately outside is roughly paved. The 1894 excavations carried out within the entrance revealed three steps in the paving leading down to the lower interior. Two other breaches in the enclosure wall are probably not original features and instead relate to the bridle path which cuts through the enclosure. The enclosure appears to have been sited to take advantage of the Grim's Lake stream which flows through the northern part of the enclosure and which was allowed access through a purpose built culvert. Within the enclosure, 24 stone hut circles are visible and include banks of stone and earth each surrounding a circular or oval internal area. These may be later in date than the enclosure. Twenty of the stone circles are circular in shape and their internal diameter varies between 2m and 5m with the average being 3.17m. The remaining huts are oval in shape and their internal dimensions varies between 4.9m and 2.8m long by 4.2m and 2m wide. The height of all the surrounding walls varies between 0.2m and 0.9m with the average being 0.57m. Sixteen of the huts were partly excavated by the Dartmoor Exploration Committee in 1894. This work revealed a variety of features, structures and artefacts including: porches; doorways; raised benches; paved floors; hearths; cooking holes; charcoal; anvil stones; pottery; flint flakes; flint scrapers and cooking stones. Following the excavation the huts were partly restored using the debris removed from the buildings. In addition to the 24 stone hut circles, low rubble banks defining at least four small internal paddocks or garden plots survive against the western wall of the enclosure. Whilst these clearly postdate the enclosure wall, it is likely that they are contemporary with the settlement. A small number of lynchets also survive within the enclosure and may represent the remains of stock control boundaries. Immediately south east of the enclosure at least nine stone hut circles survive together with lengths of field boundary wall and distinct areas from which stone has been cleared. The stone hut circles within this area are all linked to rubble banks forming part of a field system. Eight of the huts are circular in shape and their interior's vary between 3.2m and 5.3m in diameter, with the average being 4.16m. The interior of the remaining building is oval, measures 3m long by 2.5m wide and is surrounded by a 1.3m wide wall standing up to 0.5m high. One hut has a visible doorway and two are conjoined. The boundary banks linking the hut circles survive as rubble banks averaging 1.2m wide and 0.4m high. Together they form at least four discrete partly enclosed areas or fields. In addition to those areas defined by the rubble banks there are a number of areas from which surface stone has been cleared, presumably to facilitate cultivation. Field evidence for reuse of the settlement is provided by two small caches. The first is built against the inner face of the south western circuit of the enclosure wall and survives as a 1.5m wide and 0.4m high drystone wall on three sides, the fourth side being formed by the enclosure wall. The interior of the structure is rectangular in shape and measures 1.3m long by 1.2m wide. The second cache is built within the eastern length of the enclosure wall and survives as a 1.4m long, 1.1m wide and 1.3m deep oval shaped hollow created by removing stones from the core of the enclosure wall. The size of these structures suggests that they were probably used for storage purposes rather than as shelters.


Cambridge University Collection, 23/06/1952, DAP/HR, 80-83 (Aerial Photograph). SDV304220.


Department of National Heritage, 24/06/1997, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV307256.

SMC granted for works concerning erosion repairs and the consolidation of hut No 7.

Sources / Further Reading

  • Monograph: Allcroft, A. H.. 1908. Earthwork of England. Earthwork of England. Unknown. 177-178, 219-224.
  • Monograph: Gover, J. E. B. + Mawer, A. + Stenton, F. M.. 1931. The Place-Names of Devon: Part One. The Place-Names of Devon: Part One. VIII. A5 Hardback. 482.
  • Monograph: Fox, A.. 1973. South West England 3,500BC - AD600 (Revised Edition). South West England. Hardback Volume. 103.
  • Monograph: Polwhele, R.. 1793 - 1806. The History of Devonshire. The History of Devonshire. Unknown. 151.
  • Monograph: Fleming, A.. 1988. The Dartmoor Reaves: Investigating Prehistoric Land Divisions. The Dartmoor Reaves: Investigating Prehistoric Land Divisions. Hardback Volume.
  • Monograph: Worth, R. H.. 1953. Dartmoor. Dartmoor. Hardback Volume.
  • Article in Serial: Lowe, H. J.. 1915-1920. The Dartmoor Antiquities and their Builders. Transactions of the Torquay Natural History Society. 2. 133.
  • Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1988. DAP/KM. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 1-2.
  • Monograph: Rowe, S.. 1896. Perambulation of the Forest of Dartmoor. Perambulation of the Forest of Dartmoor. Unknown. 55.
  • Article in Serial: Baring Gould, S.. 1895. Second Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 27. Digital. 82-3.
  • Article in Serial: Wilkinson, J. G.. 1862. On British Remains on Dartmoor. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 18. Unknown. 117-119.
  • Aerial Photograph: Royal Air Force. 1946. CPE/UK/1824. Royal Air Force Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 3041.
  • Monograph: Butler, J.. 1991. Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities: Volume One - The East. Dartmoor Atlas of Antiquities: Volume One - The East. One. Paperback Volume. 143-145.
  • Monograph: Grinsell, L. V.. 1976. Folklore of Prehistoric Sites in Britain. Folklore of Prehistoric Sites in Britain. Unknown. 96.
  • Article in Serial: Wilkinson, J. G.. 1861. On Ancient British Walls. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 17.
  • Article in Serial: Chanter, J. F.. 1927. Grimspound. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 33. 87-88.
  • Article in Serial: Ormerod, G. W.. 1864. On the Hut Circles on the Eastern Side of Dartmoor. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 20. Unknown. 305.
  • Article in Serial: Watkin, H. R.. 1918-1919. The Etymology of Grimspound. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 10. 291-292.
  • Article in Serial: Pattison, P. + Fletcher, M.. 1994. Grimspound, One Hundred Years On. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 52. 21-34.
  • Site Visit: Ancient Monuments. 1995. Grimspound.
  • Correspondence: DCMS. 1998. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter.
  • Report - Survey: Griffiths, D. M.. 1999.
  • Article in Serial: Craddock, P. T. + Craddock, B. R.. 1996. The Beginnings of Metallurgy in South West Britain: Hypotheses and Evidence. Mining History: Bulletin PDMHS. The Archaeology of Mining and Metallurgy in. 13, Number 2. A4 Paperback. 52-63.
  • Monograph: Grinsell, L. V.. 1970. Discovering Regional Archaeology: South Western England. Discovering Regional Archaeology: South Western England. Unknown. 25.
  • Aerial Photograph: NMR. SX7080.
  • Article in Serial: Baring Gould, S.. 1894. 1st Report of the Dartmoor Exploration Committee: The Exploration of Grimspound. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 26. A4 Comb Bound. 101-121.
  • Plan - sketch: Shillibeer, A. C.. 1829. Plan of Grimspound.
  • Article in Serial: Chanter, J. F.. 1927. Proceedings of the Congress of the British Archaeological Association at Exeter. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 33. 20.
  • Article in Serial: Ormerod, G. W.. 1872. What is Grimspound?. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 5. 41-46.
  • Article in Serial: Brailsford, J. W.. 1938. Bronze Age Stone Monuments of Dartmoor. Antiquity. 12. 453.
  • Article in Serial: Adams, M. + Burnard, R.. 1913. Proceedings at the Annual Meeting. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 45. 37-38.
  • Article in Serial: Fox, A.. 1957. The Prehistoric Monuments of Dartmoor. Archaeological Journal. 114. 158-159.
  • Aerial Photograph: NMR. 1977. SX7080/4.
  • Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University Collection. 23/06/1952. DAP/HR. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. 80-83.
  • Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University Collection. 1962. DAP/AFH. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. 6-8.
  • Report - Survey: Pattison, P.. 1991. A Survey of Grimspound, Manaton Parish, Devon. Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England Report. A4 Stapled + Digital.
  • Article in Serial: Fox, A.. 1954. Excavations at Kestor. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 86. 46.
  • Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1986. DAP/HP. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 7.
  • Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1989. DAP/OW. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 18.
  • Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 24/06/1997. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter.
  • Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1994. DAP/XJ. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 13, 14.
  • Interpretation: Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England. 1985. Aerial Photograph Project. Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England Aerial Photograph P. Cartographic.
  • Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1995. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter.
  • Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1996. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter.
  • Correspondence: DCMS. 2004. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter.
  • Article in Serial: Burnard, R.. 1906. Early Man. Victoria History of the County of Devon. 1. A4 Hardback. 350-352.
  • Article in Serial: Barber, J.. 1972. 33rd report on archaeology and early history. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 104. A5 Paperback.
  • Article in Serial: Fox, A.. 1958. Twenty-Fourth Report on the Archaeology and Early History of Devon. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 90. A4 Hardback.
  • Personal Comment: Grinsell, L. V.. 1977. Grimspound.
  • Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2010. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey. Map (Digital).
  • Leaflet: Dartmoor National Park + English Heritage. 2008. Grimspound: A Prehistoric Settlement. A5 Stapled. 1-24.
  • Article in Serial: Rowe, S.. 1830. 'Antiquarian Investigations of the Forest of Dartmoor'. Transactions of the Plymouth Institute. 1.
  • Monograph: Jones, J. P.. 1823. Observations on the Scenery and Antiquities in the Neighbourhood of Moretonhampstead. Observations on the Scenery and Antiquities in the Neighbourhood of Moreton. Unknown.
  • Ground Photograph: Dartmoor National Park Authority. 1993 - 2003. Mixed Archive Material.
  • National Heritage List for England: English Heritage. 2014. National Heritage List for England. Historic Houses Register. Website.
  • Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University. 1966. CUC/ANM. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. Photograph (Paper). 33-37.
  • Monograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1988. Devon's Past. An Aerial View. Devon's Past. An Aerial View. Paperback Volume. 37.

Associated Monuments

MDV8781Parent of: Arrowhead found near Grimspound, Manaton (Find Spot)
MDV8781Related to: Arrowhead found near Grimspound, Manaton (Find Spot)
MDV8780Parent of: Flint arrowhead, Grimspound (Find Spot)
MDV60106Parent of: Flint scraper found at Grimspound (Find Spot)
MDV8779Parent of: Grimspound enclosure entranceway, Manaton (Monument)
MDV6641Parent of: Grimspound enclosure wall, Manaton (Monument)
MDV43897Parent of: Hut circle 1, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43906Parent of: Hut circle 10, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43907Parent of: Hut circle 11, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43908Parent of: Hut circle 12, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43909Parent of: Hut circle 13, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43910Parent of: Hut circle 14, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43911Parent of: Hut circle 15, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43912Parent of: Hut circle 16, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43913Parent of: Hut circle 17, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43914Parent of: Hut circle 18, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43915Parent of: Hut circle 19, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43898Parent of: Hut circle 2, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43916Parent of: Hut circle 20, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43917Parent of: Hut circle 21, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43918Parent of: Hut circle 22, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43919Parent of: Hut circle 23, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43920Parent of: Hut circle 24, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43899Parent of: Hut circle 3, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43900Parent of: Hut circle 4, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43901Parent of: Hut circle 5, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43902Parent of: Hut circle 6, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43903Parent of: Hut circle 7, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43904Parent of: Hut circle 8, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV43905Parent of: Hut circle 9, Grimspound settlement (Monument)
MDV55278Parent of: Storage cache in enclosure wall, Grimspound (Monument)
MDV55277Parent of: Storage structures built against enclosure wall, Grimspound (Monument)
MDV8781Parent of: Arrowhead found near Grimspound, Manaton (Find Spot)
MDV8781Related to: Arrowhead found near Grimspound, Manaton (Find Spot)
MDV6646Related to: STREAMWORKS in the Parish of Manaton (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV1006 - Visit to Grimspound prehistoric site
  • EDV1009 - Monmument Protection Programme visit to Grimspound
  • EDV1010 - Site visit to Grimspound
  • EDV1011 - Site visit to Grimspound
  • EDV1012 - Ordnance Survey aerial photograph run
  • EDV1013 - Survey of Grimspound
  • EDV4820 - Site visit to Grimspound
  • EDV4821 - Site visit to Grimspound
  • EDV4822 - Site visit to Grimspound
  • EDV4823 - Erosion repairs at Grimspound
  • EDV4824 - Repairs at Grimspound

Date Last Edited:Jun 6 2017 3:42PM