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Name:Romano-British roadside settlement to the north of Boston Road, Sleaford
HER Number:60584
Type of record:Monument

Summary

Romano-British roadside settlement to the north of Boston Road, Sleaford

Grid Reference:TF 077 459
Map Sheet:TF04NE
Parish:EWERBY AND EVEDON, NORTH KESTEVEN, LINCOLNSHIRE
KIRKBY LA THORPE, NORTH KESTEVEN, LINCOLNSHIRE
SLEAFORD, NORTH KESTEVEN, LINCOLNSHIRE

Full description

PRN 60584
[Includes PRN 60696, now deleted.]
A Romano-British roadside settlement extending along each side of Mareham Lane has been revealed by archaeological investigations over several decades. Associated features including field systems to the east (PRN 64447) and west (PRN 64446), burials (PRNs 64441 and 64442), further finds (PRNs 64444 and 64445) and the Roman road itself (PRN 64105) have also been revealed in these investigations.

To the west of the road:
Roman surface finds have been reported from this area for a very long time. The first excavation was carried out in 1955 in a (successful) attempt to locate Mareham Lane (see PRN 64105). A paved area with a raised stone platform, which probably represents a roadside building, was also found along with a large quantity of pottery. {15}{32}
Further excavations were carried out in the summer of 1960, in an attempt to locate St Giles Church. The corner of a substantial range of Roman buildings was encountered as well as a large circular structure which was initially interpreted as a corn dryer but is now believed to be a malt kiln (PRN 60584a). {15}{34}
An enamelled patera handle was picked up off this site in the 1960s. The trackway running east to west was also possibly observed at this time.{9}
During excavations in the 1960s, more Roman features (PRN 60584b) were revealed including a corn drier, a large aisled building (probably a barn), a well and numerous ditches as well as two phases of the Roman road itself (see PRN 64105). {15}{34}
A selection of Roman pottery and animal bone was found during construction on St Giles Avenue at TF 0782 4593. Pottery types include grey ware and colour-coated wares. {10}
During excavation along St Giles Avenue in 1996, Romano-British features dating from the 2nd to late 3rd centuries AD were uncovered. These include an east to west aligned road (PRN 60584c), a substantial masonry building (PRN 60584d) with external paved area, various pits and ditches and two possible votive deposits. The votive deposits consist of a near-complete Roman jar placed alongside the foundations of the masonry building (see PRN 60584d) and also a lamb skeleton deposited with two near-complete pots (PRN 60584e), one of which contained a coin. {23}{24}
During an evaluation near St Giles Avenue (TF 07725 45920) in 2006, Roman features were uncovered. These included part of Mareham Lane (see PRN 64105), a wall representing a building foundation (which was previously revealed during excavations in the 1960s) and a rubble structure of uncertain function. This structure may relate to the nearby road or serve as an adjacent rough yard surface or rubble foundation. A small quantity of Roman pottery, tile and glass was recovered and a single Roman coin was found. {25}{26}
A single Roman coin was found on land at the back of St Giles Avenue near the junction with Boston Road (no grid reference given) in 2002. {27}
Four late Roman coins (PRN 60584j) were found in a garden of St Giles Avenue (TF 0768 4604) in 1965. {28}
A coin of Hadrian and coins of AD 253-340 (PRN 60584k) were found in the area of St Giles church. {31}

To the east of the road:
At TF 0775 4595, during a watching brief in 1995, deep, well- preserved archaeological deposits were exposed. These included two inhumation burials (see PRN 64441), a dry stone wall aligned north to south and a linear trench aligned north-south which had near vertical sides suggesting a structural function, probably the bedding trench for a timber structure. There were a number of other features, not all of which could be identified. One feature was a curved gully that was possibly the eaves drip gully of a native-style circular timber building. Varying quantities of Roman pottery were found across the site, mostly of a date range in the mid third to late fourth centuries. {1}{2}{3}
Romano-British pottery was collected from areas of earth disturbed by rabbit and mole activity at the northern end of the site during a site visit in 1996. {22}
At TF 0780 4584, during an evaluation in 1996, a number of features of Roman date were uncovered (PRN 60584f). The Roman activity was divided into two phases; a timber phase and a stone phase. The evidence for the timber phase consisted of six postholes, one group of three parallel to the Roman road Mareham Lane, the other group beside an L-shaped linear ditch. There was also a pit containing limestone rubble which was interpreted as padding for a posthole. The form and function of those timber structures could not be determined. The stone phase included evidence for a stone building at right-angles to Mareham Lane which was probably a building of moderately high status since the finds included limestone roof tiles, hypocaust tile and painted opus signinum. Pottery from the site included Samian, mortaria and amphorae fragments as well as Dales ware. In addition the metalling of a road running east to west at right angles to Mareham Lane was found, and a camber was visible. There was further metalling which may have been a courtyard or more likely a further metalled track or street leading off Mareham Lane. {4}{5}
Excavations at the Hoplands in 1997, at the new police station site, revealed more Roman remains (PRN 60584g). The earliest phases of Roman occupation of the site appears to have begun in the late 2nd century. A series of robber trenches were recorded, containing limestone fragments dated with 2nd century pottery sherds. These robber trenches appear to indicate the southern corridor of an early limestone building. Deposits of charcoal, burnt daub, hammerscale, coal and ash suggest the presence of nearby hearths or ovens. Shallow pits were also identified which are thought to have been used for the disposal of oven waste. A pit was recorded which was thought to have been used for butchery waste, contained animal remains including a partially articulated horse. After the initial building there appears to have been a short period of abandonment, but the site developed again in the mid 3rd century. A layer of gravel, aligned east to west towards Mareham Lane, was laid. It was defined on one side by a series of stake holes, at least ten, indicating that this was a deliberately planned footpath or trackway. Only a small amount of environmental and artefactual evidence was recovered from this area intimating that it was largely unoccupied. A series of pits containing a large assemblage of animal bones show that this area was being used as a midden and perhaps also for meat processing and disposal. Five infant burials, all aligned west-east and all younger than 2.5 months old, were found beneath a late 3rd to early 4th century building (built on the site of an earlier building). Unfortunately there is no evidence for differentiating between burials prior to the construction of the building or afterwards. The building is thought to have had limestone foundations and large quantities of wattle and daub recovered from the building area suggests that this may have been the construction material used for the walls. The building had substantial uprights (that probably supported a timber roof), internal walls and a floor surface. It is thought that the building, which was not fully excavated, consisted of at least two rooms, a passageway and a floor surface, possibly of stone. Outside the building a drystone wall had been constructed forming a boundary parallel to the existing gravel lane. Two domestic ovens lined with limestone were recorded close by. By the late 4th to 5th century the building established in the late 3rd century appears to have been abandoned. A large quantity of limestone was robbed from the walls and the hearth was backfilled. Thick layers of red daub and white plaster were recovered from the buildings rooms, together with a quantity of nails, suggesting it was dismantled for use elsewhere. Quantities of burnt wattle and daub support a theory that this was a destructive phase and that vandalism may have taken place. Collapse of other structures in this period further supports this theory. Large amounts of refuse across the site indicate that this area was now being used as a rubbish dump, perhaps from another nearby settlement. Two adult skeletons were disturbed but not excavated. A total of twenty-four coins were recovered from the site together with quantities of pottery, animal bone, copper earpicks, tweezers, bone pins and needles, hypocaust tile, part of a strigil and quern stones. {6}{7}{8}
Three sherds of Roman pottery were retrieved from a hole dug by Anglian Water on Boston Road/Mareham Lane at TF 0777 4582.{10}
In 2001, an archaeological evaluation was carried out at TF 0787 4624. On the eastern side of this site a large number of side ditches, linears and pits have been recorded, suggesting agricultural activity (see PRN 64447). Metalling of Mareham road (PRN 64105) was recorded. A large refuse pit and a beam slot are indicators of limited occupation, the beam slot indicating that there was a timber built structure here. This appears to be contemporary with those on the initial occupation of the new police station site. On the western side of the site ditches containing 3rd and 4th century pottery appear to define a sub-rectangular enclosure. This area is a possible cemetery site (see PRN 64441). In the south-west, overlapping the sub-rectangular enclosure area there is evidence for at least one stone structure (PRN 60584h), probably built after the cemetery fell into disuse. This structure appears to be half timbered and contemporary with the main phase of occupation on the new police station site. The lack of roof tiles suggest that the roof was thatched, or that the tiles were reused. A small amount of hammerscale recovered via the environmental sampling suggests iron smithing on site or locally. Further land division occurred after the cemetery fell into disuse, shown by the boundary ditches containing evidence for disturbed burials. Finds recovered from this site include twenty-two coins dating from at least 330 to the end of the 4th century, various animal remains and a substantial amount of pottery. The pottery encompasses the entire Roman period, the highest proportion being from the 4th century. Some of the pottery is Samian which would indicate a site of relatively high status. {11}{12}
During a watching brief in 2002 centred on TF0781 4597, a dark earth deposit was recorded which was identified as dating to a late third to fourth century abandonment of the Roman town. Pottery and animal bone of late third to fourth century date were also recorded.{13}{14}
Archaeological evaluation was conducted on land at the former Dalgety Warehouse site. The investigation revealed a general pattern of Romano-British boundary ditches, dominated by a substantial north to south aligned possible settlement boundary (PRN 60584i) that had been recut, and possibly revetted with large timber posts. The ditch was dated to the 4th century AD. Two pits were recorded on the west side of the site, associated with the Romano-British ditches, possibly suggesting that more concentrated settlement remains are located in this western area. The majority of these features dated to between the 2nd and 3rd centuries. Fewer Roman remains were located east of the substantial north-south ditch, perhaps indicating that the east side of the site was not used for habitation at that time (see PRN 64447). Seven silver coins were found during the evaluation, all of them dating to the 4th century. {16} {17}
Further investigations at the former Dalgety Warehouse site revealed more Roman deposits and finds including burials (see PRN 64441). Several distinct phases of Roman occupation were identified. Early Roman occupation features consisted mainly of widely dispersed field boundaries (see PRN 64447). By the mid Roman period settlement had expanded into this area. More boundary ditches relate to this period as well as pits and a gravel cut well. This pattern of land usage continued into the late Roman period when a substantial probable quarry hollow, located in the south-east corner of the development, was in-filled with domestic waste. Undated features that cut Roman features were assigned to a Roman or later phase. Pottery and other artefacts indicate continuous and expanding occupation of the site from the late Iron Age/conquest period until the very late 4th century AD. {18}{19}
Excavations at the Hoplands Business Centre site uncovered well preserved Roman deposits. The majority of these were linear features, probably boundary ditches forming part of an extensive pattern of ditched fields and enclosures (see PRN 64447). Several inhumation burials were also found (see PRN 64441). {20}{21}
Coins (PRN 60584l) dated AD253 to 340 and a stone container (it is uncertain if this was associated with the coins) were found near St Giles church, on the east side of Mareham Lane. {31}
During further evaluation at the Hoplands Business Centre site, more Romano-British features (PRN 60584m) were uncovered. A large number of the features date to the 2nd and 3rd century, suggesting occupation during this period. Evidence for structures was limited to a single robber trench and pieces of tile and limestone rubble wall core, suggesting the presence of a building. During the later 3rd and 4th centuries, occupation appears to decline. The whole site was covered by a dark earth deposit. {36}{37}

Unlocated finds from the general area:
Evidence for Romano-British settlement, including greyware, colour coated ware and Samian pottery, has been found at Old Place (no further location details are given). A coin of Antoninus Pius and a trumpet brooch were also found in the area (again, no further location details are given). {28}{30}
Twenty-seven late Roman coins, some illegible, and a Roman 'head-stud' brooch were found at 'Old Sleaford' in 1980 (no grid reference given). There is no indication that the coins were found together as a hoard. {28}{29}
[Please note - where finds are listed as 'Old Sleaford' only, they may have come from the Roman site near the swimming baths, PRN 63966, rather than this site. Alternatively, they may be isolated finds.]


<01> Pre-Construct Archaeology, 1995, Archaeological Watching Brief Report: The Hoplands, Sleaford (Intervention Report)


<02> Pre-Construct Archaeology, 1995, Archaeological Watching Brief: The Hoplands, Sleaford (Excavation archive)


<03> Field, F.N. and George, I., 1996, Lincolnshire History and Archaeology (Article in serial)


<04> City of Lincoln Archaeology Unit, 1997, The Hoplands, Boston Road, Sleaford: Archaeological Evaluation (Intervention Report)


<05> City of Lincoln Archaeology Unit, 1997, The Hoplands, Boston Road, Sleaford: Archaeological Evaluation (Excavation archive)


<06> Archaeological Project Services, 1997, Archaeological Excavations at The New Police Station, The Hoplands, Boston Road (Intervention Report)


<07> Archaeological Project Services, 1997, Archaeological Excavations at The New Police Station, The Hoplands, Boston Road (Excavation archive)


<08> Archaeological Project Services, 1999, Archaeological Excavations at The New Police Station, The Hoplands, Boston Road (Excavation Report)


<09> NORTH KESTEVEN RECORDS (Index)


<10> NORTH KESTEVEN RECORDS (Index)


<11> Archaeological Project Services, 2001, Archaeological Evaluation of Land at the Hoplands, Sleaford (Intervention Report)


<12> Archaeological Project Services, 2001, Archaeological Evaluation of Land at the Hoplands, Sleaford (Excavation archive)


<13> Archaeological Project Services, Feb 2003, Archaeological Watching Brief of Geotechnical Test Pits on Land at The Hoplands, Sleaford (Intervention Report)


<14> Archaeological Project Services, Feb 2003, Archaeological Watching Brief of Geotechnical Test Pits on Land at The Hoplands, Sleaford (Excavation archive)


<15> Elsdon, Shelia M, 1997, Old Sleaford Revealed (Bibliographic reference)


<16> Archaeological Project Services, June 2003, Archaeological Evaluation on land at the former Dalgety Warehouse, The Hoplands, Sleaford (Intervention Report)


<17> Archaeological Project Services, June 2003, Archaeological Evaluation on land at the former Dalgety Warehouse, The Hoplands, Sleaford (Excavation archive)


<18> Archaeological Project Services, 2005, Archaeological Scheme of Works on Land at the Former Dalgety Warehouse Site, Sleaford (Intervention Report)


<19> Archaeological Project Services, 2005, Archaeological Scheme of Works on Land at the Former Dalgety Warehouse Site, Sleaford (Excavation archive)


<20> Archaeological Project Services, 2006, Archaeological Evaluation on land at the Hoplands Business Centre, Sleaford (Intervention Report)


<21> Archaeological Project Services, 2006, Archaeological Evaluation on land at the Hoplands Business Centre, Sleaford (Excavation archive)


<22> Archaeological Project Services, 1996, Desk-Top Assessment of the Archaeological Implications of Proposed Development of Land at Hoplands Bridge, Sleaford (Intervention Report)


<23> Archaeological Project Services, 1997, Archaeological Investigation of a Pipeline along St Giles' Avenue, Sleaford (Excavation Report)


<24> Archaeological Project Services, 1997, Archaeological Investigation of a Pipeline along St Giles' Avenue, Sleaford (Excavation archive)


<25> Archaeological Project Services, Nov 2006, Archaeological Evaluation on land at St Giles Avenue, Sleaford (Intervention Report)


<26> Archaeological Project Services, Nov 2006, Archaeological Evaluation on land at St Giles Avenue, Sleaford (Excavation archive)


<27> Daubney, Adam, 2002, Roman coin (Correspondence)


<28> Sleaford SMR cards (Index)


<29> White, A. J., 1980, List of metal finds from Old Sleaford (Unpublished document)


<30> 1958, Letter about finds from Old Place, Sleaford and Scredington (Correspondence)


<31> 1936-1964, Letters and other material relating to the Stubley Collection (Correspondence)


<32> FENNELL, K.R., 1955, Excavations at Old Place, Sleaford (July-October 1955) (Intervention Report)


<33> 1959, EAST MIDLANDS ARCHAEOLOGICAL BULLETIN (Index)


<34> City and County Museum, 1960 onwards, Letters, notes and other material relating to the 1960s excavations at Old Sleaford (Correspondence)


<35> FENNELL, K.R., 1959, 'King Street in Kesteven and some notes on Old Sleaford' in The Lincolnshire Historian (Article in serial)


<36> Archaeological Project Services, 2008, Archaeological Evaluation on Land at Hoplands Business Centre, Sleaford (Intervention Report)


<37> Archaeological Project Services, 2008, Archaeological Evaluation on Land at Hoplands Business Centre, Sleaford (Excavation archive)


<38> Pevsner, N., and Harris, J., with Antram, N., 1989, Buildings of England (second edition) (Bibliographic reference)


<39> Ordnance Survey, Sleaford O.S. cards (Index)

Monument Types

  • BARN (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • BOUNDARY DITCH (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • CORN DRYING KILN (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • DITCH (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FINDSPOT (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • GULLY (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • HOUSE (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • MALT KILN (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • OVEN (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • PATH (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • PIT (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • POST HOLE (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • ROAD (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • SETTLEMENT (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • WALL (limestone, Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • WELL (Roman - 100 AD to 409 AD)
  • ENCLOSURE (rectangular, Roman - 200 AD to 399 AD)
  • BURIAL (Roman - 250 AD to 399 AD)

Associated Finds

  • ANIMAL REMAINS (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • BROOCH (Roman - 43 AD to 100 AD)
  • BROOCH (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • NAIL (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • NAIL CLEANER (Roman - 43 AD to 200 AD?)
  • NEEDLE (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • PIN (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • QUERN (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • RING (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • SHERD (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • SHERD (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • SHERD (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • SHERD (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • TILE (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • TILE (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • BROOCH (Roman - 100 AD to 199 AD)
  • SAMPLE (Roman - 101 AD to 400 AD)
  • SHERD (Roman - 101 AD to 401 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 138 AD to 161 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 161 AD to 180 AD)
  • BEAKER (Roman - 200 AD to 300 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 200 AD to 299 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 200 AD to 399 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 201 AD to 401 AD)
  • HUMAN REMAINS (Roman - 250 AD to 399 AD)
  • NAIL (Roman - 250 AD to 350 AD)
  • STRIGIL (Roman - 250 AD to 350 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 268 AD to 270 AD)
  • ANIMAL REMAINS (Roman - 270 AD to 399 AD)
  • SHERD (Roman - 270 AD to 399 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 275 AD to 399 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 284 AD to 305 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 300 AD to 399 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 300 AD to 409 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 306 AD to 337 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 335 AD to 337 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 350 AD to 353 AD)
  • COIN (Roman - 364 AD to 375 AD)

Associated Events

  • Archaeological excavation along St Giles' Avenue, Sleaford, 1996
  • Archaeological evaluation at The Hoplands
  • Watching brief at the new Police Station site, Boston Road
  • Watching brief on land at The Hoplands, Sleaford
  • Excavations adjacent to St Giles Avenue, 1955.
  • Excavations near St Giles Church, 1960
  • Excavations on land between Old Place and Mareham Lane, 1960-61
  • Archaeological evaluation at the former Dalgety Warehouse site, The Hoplands, Sleaford
  • Watching brief at The Hoplands, Sleaford, 1995
  • Watching brief on land at the former Dalgety Warehouse site, Sleaford
  • Archaeological excavation at the former Dalgety Warehouse site, Sleaford
  • Archaeological evaluation on land at Hoplands Business Centre, Sleaford
  • Site visit to land at Hoplands Bridge, Sleaford
  • Archaeological Evaluation on land at St Giles Avenue, Sleaford
  • Excavations at the new Police Station site, Boston Road
  • Intermittent excavations at Old Sleaford, 1957-59
  • Archaeological evaluation on land at Hoplands Business Centre, Sleaford
  • Archaeological evaluation at The Hoplands, Boston Road, 1996

Protected Status

  • Conservation Area

Sources and further reading

<01>Intervention Report: Pre-Construct Archaeology. 1995. Archaeological Watching Brief Report: The Hoplands, Sleaford. THS95.
<02>Excavation archive: Pre-Construct Archaeology. 1995. Archaeological Watching Brief: The Hoplands, Sleaford. LCNCC 134.95.
<03>Article in serial: Field, F.N. and George, I.. 1996. Lincolnshire History and Archaeology. VOL 31 P 60.
<04>Intervention Report: City of Lincoln Archaeology Unit. 1997. The Hoplands, Boston Road, Sleaford: Archaeological Evaluation. HOP96.
<05>Excavation archive: City of Lincoln Archaeology Unit. 1997. The Hoplands, Boston Road, Sleaford: Archaeological Evaluation. LCNCC 172.96.
<06>Intervention Report: Archaeological Project Services. 1997. Archaeological Excavations at The New Police Station, The Hoplands, Boston Road. SPS97.
<07>Excavation archive: Archaeological Project Services. 1997. Archaeological Excavations at The New Police Station, The Hoplands, Boston Road. LCNCC 120.97.
<08>Excavation Report: Archaeological Project Services. 1999. Archaeological Excavations at The New Police Station, The Hoplands, Boston Road. SPS97.
<09>Index: NORTH KESTEVEN RECORDS. KIRKBY LA THORPE. NK 34.38,40, 0, -.
<10>Index: NORTH KESTEVEN RECORDS. SLEAFORD. NK 57.70, 0,-; NK 57.57, 0, -.
<11>Intervention Report: Archaeological Project Services. 2001. Archaeological Evaluation of Land at the Hoplands, Sleaford. THSA01.
<12>Excavation archive: Archaeological Project Services. 2001. Archaeological Evaluation of Land at the Hoplands, Sleaford. LCNCC:2001.59.
<13>Intervention Report: Archaeological Project Services. Feb 2003. Archaeological Watching Brief of Geotechnical Test Pits on Land at The Hoplands, Sleaford. STH02.
<14>Excavation archive: Archaeological Project Services. Feb 2003. Archaeological Watching Brief of Geotechnical Test Pits on Land at The Hoplands, Sleaford. LCNCC 2002.500.
<15>Bibliographic reference: Elsdon, Shelia M. 1997. Old Sleaford Revealed.
<16>Intervention Report: Archaeological Project Services. June 2003. Archaeological Evaluation on land at the former Dalgety Warehouse, The Hoplands, Sleaford. SDW03.
<17>Excavation archive: Archaeological Project Services. June 2003. Archaeological Evaluation on land at the former Dalgety Warehouse, The Hoplands, Sleaford. LCNCC 2003.98.
<18>Intervention Report: Archaeological Project Services. 2005. Archaeological Scheme of Works on Land at the Former Dalgety Warehouse Site, Sleaford. SDW03.
<19>Excavation archive: Archaeological Project Services. 2005. Archaeological Scheme of Works on Land at the Former Dalgety Warehouse Site, Sleaford. LCNCC 2003.98.
<20>Intervention Report: Archaeological Project Services. 2006. Archaeological Evaluation on land at the Hoplands Business Centre, Sleaford. SHBC 05.
<21>Excavation archive: Archaeological Project Services. 2006. Archaeological Evaluation on land at the Hoplands Business Centre, Sleaford. LCNCC 2005.245.
<22>Intervention Report: Archaeological Project Services. 1996. Desk-Top Assessment of the Archaeological Implications of Proposed Development of Land at Hoplands Bridge, Sleaford. SHB96.
<23>Excavation Report: Archaeological Project Services. 1997. Archaeological Investigation of a Pipeline along St Giles' Avenue, Sleaford. SSG96.
<24>Excavation archive: Archaeological Project Services. 1997. Archaeological Investigation of a Pipeline along St Giles' Avenue, Sleaford. LCNCC 137.96.
<25>Intervention Report: Archaeological Project Services. Nov 2006. Archaeological Evaluation on land at St Giles Avenue, Sleaford. SHSG06.
<26>Excavation archive: Archaeological Project Services. Nov 2006. Archaeological Evaluation on land at St Giles Avenue, Sleaford. LCNCC 2006.239.
<27>Correspondence: Daubney, Adam. 2002. Roman coin. -.
<28>Index: Sleaford SMR cards. SLEAFORD. TF 04 NE; D, AR, E, H.
<29>Unpublished document: White, A. J.. 1980. List of metal finds from Old Sleaford. 1, 3-28, 30.
<30>Correspondence: 1958. Letter about finds from Old Place, Sleaford and Scredington. -.
<31>Correspondence: 1936-1964. Letters and other material relating to the Stubley Collection. Nos. 1, 2, 29.
<32>Intervention Report: FENNELL, K.R.. 1955. Excavations at Old Place, Sleaford (July-October 1955). -.
<33>Index: 1959. EAST MIDLANDS ARCHAEOLOGICAL BULLETIN. Vol 2, p9.
<34>Correspondence: City and County Museum. 1960 onwards. Letters, notes and other material relating to the 1960s excavations at Old Sleaford. -.
<35>Article in serial: FENNELL, K.R.. 1959. 'King Street in Kesteven and some notes on Old Sleaford' in The Lincolnshire Historian. Vol 2 No. 6, pp 22-27.
<36>Intervention Report: Archaeological Project Services. 2008. Archaeological Evaluation on Land at Hoplands Business Centre, Sleaford. HBCS07.
<37>Excavation archive: Archaeological Project Services. 2008. Archaeological Evaluation on Land at Hoplands Business Centre, Sleaford. LCNCC 2007.218.
<38>Bibliographic reference: Pevsner, N., and Harris, J., with Antram, N.. 1989. Buildings of England (second edition). Lincolnshire. p 657.
<39>Index: Ordnance Survey. Sleaford O.S. cards. SLEAFORD. TF 04 NE; 14.

Related records

60583Related to: Late Iron Age settlement in Old Sleaford (Monument)
64105Related to: Mareham Lane Roman road, south of Sleaford (Monument)
64444Related to: Possible late Roman coin hoard from Old Place, Sleaford (Find Spot)
64442Related to: Roman burials to the west of Mareham Lane (Monument)
64441Related to: Roman cemetery at The Hoplands (Monument)
64445Related to: Roman finds from land to the south of Boston Road, Sleaford (Monument)
65354Related to: Roman road and other features on land at The Hoplands, immediately west of the railway (Monument)
64446Related to: Romano-British field system, Old Place, Sleaford (Monument)
64447Related to: Romano-British field system, The Hoplands, Sleaford (Monument)