HeritageGateway - Home
Site Map
Text size: A A A
You are here: Home > > > > Devon & Dartmoor HER Result
Devon & Dartmoor HERPrintable version | About Devon & Dartmoor HER | Visit Devon & Dartmoor HER online...

See important guidance on the use of this record.

If you have any comments or new information about this record, please email us.


HER Number:MDV8649
Name:Milber Down Hillfort, Combeinteignhead

Summary

Milber Down hillfort is an Iron Age multivallate hill-slope fort, consisting of four roughly concentric and fairly widely spaced ramparts with outer ditches.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 884 698
Map Sheet:SX86NE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishCoffinswell
Civil ParishHaccombe with Combe
DistrictTeignbridge
Ecclesiastical ParishCOFFINSWELL
Ecclesiastical ParishCOMBEINTEIGNHEAD
Ecclesiastical ParishHACCOMBE

Protected Status

  • Scheduled Monument 1003178: Milber Down camp
  • SHINE: Milber Down Hillfort and Milber Little Camp. Iron Age multivallate hillfort, Romano-British bivallate defended farmstead, sub-rectangular enclosure and linears north west of Little Haccombe Farm

Other References/Statuses

  • National Monuments Record: 446096
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX86NE/1
  • Old SAM County Ref: 115
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division: SX86NE3

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • HILLFORT (Constructed, Middle Iron Age - 300 BC to 101 BC (Between))

Full description

Unknown, Hill Fort, Early Iron Age B (Worksheet). SDV343551.

Main hill fort is an unusual type of Iron Age fortification, multiple defences are wide-spaced forming four concentric enclosures. Situated on hill slope, a small camp or homestead, rectangular, adjoins the main fort on the upper side. Associated with small embanked fields or other enclosures. Later than main fort (1st century AD). Situated on north slope of Down.
Pottery sherds - plain, both sites, Iron Age B type and provincial Roman wares, and vessels of Belgic and Belgo-Roman types 50-80 AD. Flints comprise 14 flakes and 1 scraper. Associated material placed in Torquay Natural History Society Museum. Other details: EXE/17/1954/1,2.

Office of Works, Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell (Schedule Document). SDV343536.

Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell. The plan of this camp bears a strong resemblance to that of Clovelly Dykes. It is an irregular quadrilateral surrounded by three valla and fosses with a wide intervening court between each. The first fosse varies from 16 to 23 feet, the second from 11 to 17 feet deep. The innermost vallum rises 5 feet above the interior of the Camp. The first and second fosses are connected by two covered ways protected by banks. On the westem side between the first and second ramparts is a large pond now dry. The whole work was surrounded at a distance of about 450 feet from the outermost rampart by a single vallum. This has now disappeared on the north-east, on which side part of the third rampart has also perished. The whole camp is bisected by the road from Newton Abbot to Torquay. The entrances were probably on the north-west and south-east where the road enters and they have mostly perished. There are still however remains of an extensive covered way between the outermost vallum and the third rampart. The outermost rampart is said to have been thrown up by William of Orange who placed artillery within the camp, but it appears to be an integral part of the original defences. Relics of William's occupation were found in 1845. Other details: Monument 115.

Hutchinson, P. O., 1862, On the Hill Fortresses, Tumuli, and some other Antiquities of Eastern Devon, 64-5 (Article in Serial). SDV338169.

Other details: Plate 6.

Ordnance Survey, 1880-1899, First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map (Cartographic). SDV336179.

'Camp' shown on 19th century map as an extensive series of earthworks.

Ordnance Survey, 1904 - 1906, Second Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map (Cartographic). SDV325644.

Ordnance Survey, 1906, 110SW (Cartographic). SDV337164.

Wall, J. C., 1906, Ancient Earthworks, 593-4 (Article in Monograph). SDV341465.

Other details: Plan.

Unknown, 1937, Interim Excavation Report, 448-9 (Article in Serial). SDV343548.

Three bronze figurines were found in the fill of the middle ditch of the hillfort during excavations on the west side of the hillfort in 1937. The figurines, dated to the first century AD, comprised a recumbent deet, a duck with a disc in its mouth and a bird with hinged legs. The fill of the ditch also contained Iron Age B pottery.

Unknown, 1937, Report of the Annual General Meeting, 59-60 (Article in Serial). SDV343561.

Unknown, 1938, 10th Report of the Annual General Meeting, 99 (Article in Serial). SDV343559.

Unknown, 1938, Interim Excavation Report, 321 (Article in Serial). SDV343549.

Morris, P., 1938, Ninth Report of the Devon Archaeological Exploration Society, 173-4 (Article in Serial). SDV343538.

Triple defences of the camp were examined. Three banks of simple construction without revetments and of one period. Iron Age pottery was found contemporary with the defences, of 1st century BC, resembling pottery found at Castle Dore, Cornwall. Group of bronzes also discovered in same ditch. Probably Gallo-Roman work of 1st century AD. Decorated spindle whorl found on berm between first and second banks. A medieval hut site produced the rim of a 12th century cooking pot.

Royal Air Force, 1946, RAF/CPE/UK/1824, RAF/CPE/UK/1824 RS 4196-97 04-NOV-1946 (Aerial Photograph). SDV352344.

Earthworks of banks and ditches, as well as cropmark banks are visible.

Radford, C. + Radford, C. A. R., 1949, Nineteenth Report on Ancient Monuments, 48 (Article in Serial). SDV25123.

Fox, A. + Raleigh Radford, C. A. + Rogers, E. H. + Shorter, A. H., 1949 - 1950, Report on the Excavations at Milber Down, 1937-8, 27-65 (Article in Serial). SDV343537.

A single entrance exists through the outer rampart on the north-west side; the road which bisects the camp has destroyed the other entrances. The outer defences had suffered somewhat through ploughing, tree planting and felling, and gravel digging. The site was excavated in 1937-8; a continuous trench cut through the three main ramparts and ditches of the west side of the camp showed the ramparts to be all of one period, of simple construction and without revetments. The middle ditch, shallower than the other v-shaped ditches, had a mass of Iron Age pottery (Glastonbury ware, 'B' ware) at the bottom, dating to the 1st century BC. At a higher level, the filling yielded a group of small bronze figurines, probably Gallo-Roman work of 1st century AD. A gully on the east side of the site between the second bank and inner ditch into which it drained, produced much occupation material including 'B' ware pottery. No structural evidence was found within, although pottery and charcoal occurred in some of the trial trenches. The site was considered to have been peacefully abandoned, possibly at the time of the Roman conquest. Other details: Plans, photographs.

Ordnance Survey, 1951 - 1980, SX86NE3 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV343539.

The western side of the hill fort at Milber Down was excavated in July and August 1937 under the direction of F Cottrill. A continuous trench 280 feet long was cut through the banks and ditches and the wide berms separating them on the west side. The three banks, all of one period, were of simple construction and without revetments. The second (middle) ditch was shallower that the V-shaped inner ditch; on the bottom of it a mass of Iron Age pottery was discovered, which was dated to the 1st century BC. At a higher level, the filling of this ditch yielded a group of small bronzes:- a deer, a duck, a bird and a ball; probably Gallo-Roman work of the 1st century AD. A decorated spindle-whorl was found on the berm between the first and second banks. On the east side of the site a gulley draining into the innermost ditch produced occupation debris including pottery similar to that from the second ditch. Iron Age hut-sites were not found, although potsherds and charcoal of this period occurred in some of the trial trenches. A medieval hut-site against the back of the innermost bank produced the rim of a 12th century cooking-pot.
Further excavation in 1938 near the trench cut in 1937 produced Iron Age 'B' decorated sherds from the bottom of the middle ditch.
This was included in the Hill Slope Fort category described by Lady Fox. these, so far as the small amount of excavation can show, are of Iron Age 'B' culture. Their defences and sites are not suited for military purposes but the situations are well suited to cattle-herding; the wide spaces between the ramparts are suitable for cattle enclosures and the entries are normally worn into hollow ways as if used by beasts. These facts combined with evidence from early writers on the importance of cattle at the time make it probable that they were cattle enclosures.
Full excavation report, plans, photographs, list of finds charcoal analysis etc. The camp was occupied from the early 1st century BC until peacefully abandoned in the early 1st century AD.
The remaining earthworks are in a good state of preservation except for small portions which have been mutilated by gravel diggings. The banks and ditches of the three inner works are of a similar nature and vary in height of bank from 0.5 to 1.5 metres and in depth of ditch
from 0.5 to 2.0 metres. The bank and ditch of the fourth and outer earthwork has been almost ploughed out to the north and east but to the west and south it appears as a bank approximately 1.0 metres high.
Iron Age 'B' pottery, bronzes and miscellaneous finds from this site are in Torquay Natural History Museum.
Two coins, a sestertius of Antoninus Pius and another of Marcus Aurelius, were dug up in or near the Iron Age hill-fort, the exact site being unknown. A third coin of Marcus Aurelius was dug up below the fort on the north side of the road from Newton Abbot. The coins are now in the Torquay Museum. Other details: Plan, profiles and photographs.

Cambridge University, 1952, CUC/HR, 54 (Aerial Photograph). SDV343547.

Fox, A., 1952 - 1953, Hill-Slope Forts and Related Earthworks in South-West England and South Wales, 1-22 (Article in Serial). SDV343545.

Keble Martin, W., 1955, A Short History of Coffinswell, 165-190 (Article in Serial). SDV342480.

Fox, A., 1958, Twenty-Fourth Report on the Archaeology and Early History of Devon (Article in Serial). SDV341823.

Peacock, D. P. S., 1969, A Contribution to the Study of Glastonbury Ware form South-Western Britain, 49,51,58 (Article in Serial). SDV135837.

Other details: Figure 5.

Grinsell, L. V., 1970, Discovering Regional Archaeology: South Western England, 28 (Monograph). SDV304192.

Fox, A., 1973, South West England 3,500BC - AD600 (Revised Edition), 141-2 (Monograph). SDV16216.

Fox considers the site was constructed before 100 BC and went out of use before 25 AD. This type of fort occurs throughout the south-west; its layout provided for stock in the outer enclosure.

Timms, S. C., 1976, The Devon Urban Survey, 1976. First Draft, 138 (Report - Survey). SDV341346.

Milber Down and Berry's Wood hillforts provide the earliest surviving evidence for settlement in the Newton Abbot area. Both were occupied in the first century BC.

Timms, S. C., 1978, Milber Down Camp (Ground Photograph). SDV343564.

Other details: Film 292.

Silvester, R. J., 1979, The Relationship of First Millennium Settlement to the Upland Areas of the South West, 181-3 (Article in Serial). SDV177352.

Silvester suggests that, in multiple enclosure forts like Milber Down, the central enclosure may have been used to protect stock while the pastoralists occupied one or more of the outer enclosures. Limited excavations at Milber Down support such a hypothesis. He also mentions finds of decorated spindle whorls, one in a stratified context.

Quinnell, N. V., 1980, Milber Down Hillfort (Plan - measured). SDV343550.

Other details: Also reduced copy (A4).

Moxon Browne, K. E., 1980, Milber Down: Commercial Excavations for a Pipeline 1980, 121-3 (Article in Serial). SDV343546.

Moxon Browne, K. E., 1980, Milber Down: Interim Report on Excavations for a Sewer Pipeline 1980 (Un-published). SDV343542.

In 1980 a sewer pipe was laid along the north-east verge of the road which cuts through the hillfort. Sections revealed evidence of ramparts and ditches.

National Monument Record, 1980, NMR Film 1743, NMR 1743/196 09-APR-1980 (Aerial Photograph). SDV356522.

Cropmarks of banks and ditches are visible.

National Monuments Record, 1980, SX8869, 1743/182,186,188,190,196,202 (Aerial Photograph). SDV343553.

Moxon Browne, K. E., 1981, Milber Down 1980 (Correspondence). SDV343562.

Three colour photographs relating to Milbur report. Show stone packed ditch referred to at top of page 123 of report as printed in Devon Archaeological Society 1980 Proceedings. Other details: 3 colour photos attached.

Timms, S. C., 1981, Milber Down Camp (Worksheet). SDV343563.

Summary of a number of changes which have occurred at Milber Camp since 1977. They have not added any significant details to the archaeology of the site. Annotated map attached. Other details: Map, photos.

Timms, S. C. + Griffith, F. M., 1981, Milber Down Camp (Ground Photograph). SDV343565.

Other details: Film 475.

Robinson, R., 1982, Milber Down Hillfort (Worksheet). SDV343541.

Site visit on 16th March 1982. A visibility splay constructed for the road entrance to the camping site has further damaged the rampart. Other details: Plan.

Devon County Council, 1983, DCC/PLA (Aerial Photograph). SDV343555.

Eastwood, C., 1984, Camp on Milberdown Hillfort (Worksheet). SDV348861.

Notes from the Woollcombe manuscript on hillforts in the Devon and Exeter Institution. Woollcombe visited the hillfort on 29th July 1840.

Griffith, F. M., 1984, DAP/BQ, 2-3, 3a (Aerial Photograph). SDV339521.

Griffith, F. M., 1984, DAP/CQ, 6 (Aerial Photograph). SDV339218.

Griffith, F. M., 1984, DAP/DE, 7a, 8 (Aerial Photograph). SDV337670.

Griffith, F. M., 1984, DAP/Z, 8 (Aerial Photograph). SDV135869.

Timms, S. C., 1984, Milber Down Camp (Worksheet). SDV343543.

Photograph, possibly by A. W. Searley, dated 1898, gives view over three ramparts under grass and without any vegetation cover. In Westcountry Studies Library.

Griffith, F. M., 1985, DAP/FE, 5 (Aerial Photograph). SDV47324.

Department of Environment, 1985, Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Devon (Correspondence). SDV343524.

Scheduled Monument Consent not granted for laying of foul drain.

Devon Archaeological Society, 1987, Milber Down (Leaflet). SDV340352.

Department of Environment, 1987, Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon (Correspondence). SDV343533.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for replacement of fence between fields known as the St Mary Church Road field and Far Higher Aller, and for construction of a new fence adjacent to the farm drive.

Griffith, F., 1988, Devon's Past. An Aerial View, 41 (Monograph). SDV64198.

Scrub has grown up over part of the site and one quarter of the defences has been lost: the rampart is now visible only as a cropmark.

Devon County Council, 1989, DAP 6716, DAP 6716/01 23-JUN-1989 (MG) (Aerial Photograph). SDV361594.

Cropmarks of a possible ditch are visible.

Griffith, F. M., 1989, DAP/LL, 2-3 (Aerial Photograph). SDV343556.

Griffith, F. M., 1989, DAP/MG, 1 (Aerial Photograph). SDV340220.

Griffith, F. M., 1989, DAP/NC, 9-10 (Aerial Photograph). SDV339523.

Department of Environment, 1990, Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon (Correspondence). SDV343534.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for excavation of a trench to replace existing water pipe with a new main.

Mortimer, R. W., 1991, An Archaeological Evaluation at ARC Aller Vale (Colesville) Quarry, Coffinswell, Newton Abbot, 1991, 2 (Report - Evaluation). SDV343540.

Four trenches excavated at right angles to a curving field boundary at SX882697 disproved the hypothesis that this marked the line of an unrecognised outer rampart and ditch. No archaeological features found. Other details: Figure 2.

Department of National Heritage, 1994, Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon (Correspondence). SDV343526.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for excavation of three trial pits.

Department of National Heritage, 1994, Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon (Correspondence). SDV343529.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for extensions to buildings, together with additional hardstanding, permanent fencing and drainage.

Department of National Heritage, 1995, Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon (Correspondence). SDV343531.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for extensions to buildings to increase the size of the slaughter hall and covered reception area, together with the provision of additional hardstanding, permanent fencing and drainage.

Grant, N., 1995, The Occupation of Hillforts in Devon during the Late Roman and Post Roman Periods, 103 (Article in Serial). SDV7954.

Fox, A., 1996, Prehistoric Hillforts in Devon, 42-3 (Monograph). SDV7958.

Allan, J. + Timms, S. C., 1996, Treasures of Ancient Devon, 20 (Monograph). SDV322592.

Other details: Photo.

Quinnell, H., 1998, Later Prehistoric Pottery Survey (Report - Survey). SDV336212.

Circa 200 sherds of middle/Late Iron Age pot, recovered during excavation. Also other pottery recovered - medieval, other ceramics - oven/hearth furniture, other clay artefact and also other non-ceramics recovered, stone whorl, iron object and copper alloy object. Now with Exeter Archaeology . Other details: DBID 1771.

Environment Agency, 1998-2017, LiDAR DTM data (1m resolution) EA: South Devon Coast to Dartmoor, LIDAR SX8869; SX8870 Environment Agency DTM 01-JAN-1998 to 31-MAY-2017 (Cartographic). SDV361470.

Earthworks of banks and ditches are visible.

Butler, J., 2000, Peter Orlando Hutchinson's Travels in Victorian Devon. Illustrated Journals, 79 (Monograph). SDV360682.

Hutchinson visited the hillfort on 22nd October 1853. He described the interior as 'squareish in form, measuring 134 by 154 yards with the road from Newton running through it. There are three aggers and ditches and outside these there are some extensive circumvallations too irregular to describe'. He goes onto say that according to Lyson's the outworks were thrown up by the Prince of Orange. Other details: Plan and illustration.

English Heritage, 2009, Heritage at Risk Register 2009: South West, 111 (Report - non-specific). SDV342694.

Generally satisfactory but with significant localised problems. Principal vulnerability arable ploughing.

Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2009, Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon (Correspondence). SDV342241.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted, subject to conditions, in respect of proposed works concerning archaeological evaluation of the site to inform the foundation design for a proposed new build and service runs.

English Heritage, 2010, Heritage at Risk Register 2010: South West, 104 (Report - non-specific). SDV344777.

National Monuments Record, 2011, 446096 (National Monuments Record Database). SDV346732.

Milber Down Camp is an Iron Age hillfort. The banks and ditches of the three inner works are of a similar nature and vary in height of bank from 0.5 metres to 1.5 metres and in depth of ditch from 0.5 metres to 2.0 metres. the bank and ditch of the fourth and outer earthwork has been almost ploughed out to the north and east. To the west and south it appears as a bank approximately 1.0 metre in height.

English Heritage, 2011, Heritage at Risk Register 2011: South West, 109 (Report - non-specific). SDV355280.

Generally satisfactory but with significant localised problems. Declining. Principal vulnerability arable ploughing.

Griffith, F. M. + Wilkes, E. M., 2011, In the Footsteps of Pioneering Women; Some Recent Work on Devon Hillforts (Article in Serial). SDV361500.

Ordnance Survey, 2011, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV346129.

'Settlement' shown on modern mapping as a series of earthworks to the north and south of the road.

Griffith, F.M. + Quinnell, H. + Wilkes, E, 2013, Hillforts of Devon, 3-5 (Monograph). SDV352457.

Classic multiple enclosure hillslope fort situated on a west facing slope above the Aller Brook. It comprises four broadly concentric squarish enclosures, of which the innermost enclosure has the most substantial earthworks. The entrances are now obscured by the road that runs through the hillfort.
Excavations across the earthworks in 1937-8 showed the ramparts to be of a single phase construction. All the pottery found during the excavation proved to be Middle Iron Age South Western Decorated ware dating to the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC. A group of three small bronze figures, a bird, a stag and a duck were also found high up in the fills of the second ditch
It is possible that the use of SWD ware continued in to the 1st centuries BC-AD or that the site was abandoned by the 1st century BC. The latter would fit the deposition of the bronze figures which are thought to date to the first century AD.
See guide booklet for more information.

Newman, P., 2015, Castle Plantation, Milber Down Camp, Newton Abbot, on advance of damage remediation: Survey (Report - Survey). SDV363183.

Following the discovery of an area of severe, deliberate damage to a 62 metre section of the ramparts at Milber Down Camp in 2014, a detailed survey of the affected area and record of the damage was requested in advance of remediation. An earthwork survey of the northern half of the camp, within Castle Plantation, was also undertaken, to offer context for the damaged area. The disturbed earthwork was recorded at 1:500 scale as a hachured plan, while cut features were recorded in section and accompanied by photographs. The work was timed to take place just after a campaign to clear the northern section of Castle Plantation of invasive laurel and the reduction of scrub within the inner enclosure.

Damage has been inflicted on the northern, straight section of the middle rampoart approximately 55 metres south of the footpath. Approximately 62 metres of this earthworks has been subjected to a deliberate, unauthorized intervention in which unknown perpetrators have re-shaped the bank and part of the ditch to form an apparent mountain biking obstacle course. The most severe of these interventions are three, vertical cuts into the bank of the rampart to form hollows (a – c). These have sliced not only into the turf and topsoil but quite severely into the substance of the built earthwork. The deepest (b) has a vertical cut face of over 1m. Substantial amounts of earth have been removed from these cuttings and either dumped on two small spoil heaps (d) in the centre of the rampart ditch,
or use to form artificial humps as additional obstacles for the cycle riders. Additional damage was inflicted to the base of the ditch where a cutting has been made into its flank on the north side. Other
lss severecuttings have been made at the top of the rampart on the inside. These have the appearance of shallow trenchesbut have not pentrated the ground to a depth likely to have affected the archaeoloigcal layers. A ramp comprising two lumps, has been sculpted from the rampart, and stands to 1m high; the remaining soil appears to be undisturbed. A large scooped hollow at the western extremity of the disturbed area (p) is unlikely to have inflcted deep damage.

Apart from the deliberate damage to the site, the ramparts and interior surfaces do not appear to have suffered any other recent damage through human agency. However, storm-felled trees are the most destructive problem at this site. At the time of this survey, several examples could be seen to have occurred in the winter of 2014-15, including two which seriously affected sections of ramparts. A future management plan should include giving health checks to all trees situated on the ramparts, ditches, and within the enclosure interiors, with a view to a controlled felling of any whose demise appears imminent. Self seeded saplings should also be removed, especially on the ramparts. Laurel regrowth will certainly remain a major problem for the foreseeable future; its continued monitoring and reduction will be essential to the welfare of this monument.

Ellis, C, 2015, Former Milber Down Abattoir, Newton Abbot: Evaluation and Watching Brief (Report - Evaluation). SDV360332.

An archaeological evaluation and a watching brief of associated geotechnical investigations was undertaken by Cotswold Archaeology in October and November 2014, at the Milber Down Abattoir site, Newton Abbot, Devon (centred on NGR: 88629 69649) for Smiths Gore on behalf of Milber Developments Limited.
A number of trenches were opened up targeted on previous archaeological investigations. For the purpose of this monument the focus is on Trench 4 and Trench 7.

Trench 4
This trench was targeted on earlier earthworks, based on historic mapping evidence indicating the location of the 4th, outer circuit of enclosure ditches of Milber Hillfort. It was also located to investigate the possibility of a sharp turn in this ditch direction (to the east) indicating that the Roman ‘Small Camp’ was actually bivallate in construction, as had been suggested in the 2009 report by Exeter Archaeology. Three ditches (403, 405, 410) and a small pit (407) were recorded in the trench at depths of 0.44 – 0.68m. A small worked flint core of Neolithic/Bronze Age date was recovered from topsoil 400.
Small circular pit 407 was 0.78m diameter, 0.24m deep and sealed by the subsoil 401. Charcoal-rich basal fill 408 was 100% bulk sampled. It was truncated by later, north-west/south-east aligned ditch 403, which had abundant stone inclusions in the very compacted fill 404. Although not plotted in the geophysical survey results, the ditch corresponds exactly to a linear anomaly clearly visible in this part of the site (Stratascan 2014, Fig.3). The ditch was 0.66m wide and 0.56m deep. It truncated cut feature 405 visible in the north section, west end, of the trench which is probably an earlier phase of the hillfort ditch. This in turn was later re-cut by the very distinctive Iron Age hillfort ditch 410. Earlier ditch 405 was approximately 2m wide and 0.3m deep and had been cut by the 3.4m wide hillfort ditch 410. All the ditches were sealed below the subsoil 401.
The ditch sequence indicates that the Roman Small Camp was not bivallate, but univallate in construction, as all the earlier earthwork mapping evidence indicates (Ecus 2014a, figs. 5a, 5b). The alignment of north-west/south-east ditch 403 was perpendicular to the possible early phase of hillfort ditch 405. Later, both features were physically truncated by the larger, very distinctive, outer ditch (410) of the Milber Hillfort complex. This ditch was also recorded in the west end of Trench 7 to the north. This may mean that there was a re-use of the Iron Age Hillfort ditch in the Roman period as a second line of earthworks on the west side of the Roman Small Camp.

Trench 7.
This trench was targeted on both the Milber Down hillfort and the (Roman) Small Camp ditches. These were known from earlier investigations (Fox et. al.1949/50; EMAFU 1993, 2009), mapping evidence (Ecus 2014a) and the geophysical survey (Stratascan 2014), to cut across the site on a north-east/south-west alignment. Archaeological features and deposits were recorded at a depth of only 0.25m. Truncated Roman urned cremation burial vessel 704, of 1st century AD date, was recorded at the east end of the trench at the very base of the ploughsoil at 0.52m depth (see MDV120039). 1st century BC to mid to late 1st century AD pottery and a 20th-century copper alloy coin were recovered from the topsoil 700. Modern ditches 729 and 741, a probable modern posthole 716, and a small pit 748 were also recorded from this trench.
The trench was parallel to, and 17m to the south-west of, Exeter Archaeology’s 1993 evaluation Trench 3 (EMAFU 1993) and the 2009 Trench 6 (EA 2009). Trench 7 contained both the hillfort ditch 711 and Roman Small Camp ditch 708 (see MDV8653). These were clearly visible because of the relatively dark and thick tertiary fills infilling the final upper parts of the cuts of both ditches. Both ditches cut 0.19m thick deposit 707, a light yellowish-brown clayey silt. This was consistent with a layer containing micaceous pottery of later Iron Age date recorded in Trench 3 of 1993 (EMAFU 1993, 4). No pottery was recorded from this deposit in the present fieldwork.
Both ditches 708 and 711 were extensively bulk sampled and monolith sampled throughout their fill sequences. Unfortunately, the modern foul sewer trench 741 cut the hillfort ditch 711 at this point in the west of the trench. Following approval from English Heritage and DCCHET, hillfort ditch 711 was not fully excavated, and hand excavation was discontinued at the base of the foul sewer pipe (at 1.4m depth). Previously, this ditch had been recorded as having a maximum depth of 2.56m
(EMAFU 1993, 3).
Iron Age hillfort ditch 711 was 3.98m wide and >1.4m deep with a steep profile and a number of fine silting deposits and possible dump deposits visible within the fill sequence (712, 739, 742, 743, 744, 745). A relatively darker deposit 745 near the base of the excavated section was visible against the east side of the ditch which was bulk sampled. No rampart deposit was visible to the east side of this ditch as recorded in the 1937 trench (Fox et.al. 1949/50) and the 1993 evaluation and designated as ‘the outer rampart’ (EMAFU 1993, 3). This ditch was also recorded in the very west end of Trench 4 (410) approximately 49m to the south-west.

Baker, D., 2016, Milber Down Camp, Newton Abbot (Un-published). SDV360568.

In 2012 and 2013, research was undertaken to establish whether a modern, nonintrusive survey could contribute to current understanding of Milber Down Camp in Devon. The project had two facets; to ‘look in’ at the monument itself and to ‘look out’ at the wider world in which it existed. The project utilised documentary research, aerial photography, LiDAR, geophysical survey, topographical survey and evaluation of the excavation undertaken in the late 1930s. This is a short account of the geophysical survey.

The site was excavated in 1937 by the Devon Archaeological Exploration Society, the focus of which was to examine the construction of the ramparts on the western side (Cottrill 1937, pp3). A series of small trenches targeted areas just inside the bank of the central enclosure at locations deemed to offer protection from the prevailing weather and likely to yield evidence of structures (Cottrill 1937, pp4). No prehistoric structures were located. Five circular depressions were noted North of the road in the second enclosure, but following limited excavation they were not thought to be of prehistoric origin.
Finds included pottery, largely South West Decorated Ware and coarse plain wares, predominantly derived from the second ditch and from a gully behind the central enclosure to the East. Other finds included fragments of a corn drying oven, large amounts of charcoal, a slate spindle whorl, iron slag and part of an iron dagger pommel. In the closing hours of the excavation, a worker was tasked with widening a section of trench in order to locate a missing rim from a fragment of pottery. He returned with a bronze ball, a bronze bird with detachable wings, a bronze stag and a bronze duck (see Figure 2). The figures were seemingly deposited together on a horizon of soil derived from the decomposition of organic matter, 70cm from the base of the ditch. They are suggested as 1st Century AD in date, influenced by the Roman world but of Celtic origin and deposited following the abandonment of the camp.

In 1938 excavation (Fox et al 1949) centred upon a ploughed out rectilinear earthwork situated on the periphery of the (outer) fourth rampart, known as the Upper Camp or Little Milber, which now lies under abattoir buildings (see Figure 1). The excavation yielded native pottery of mid 1st Century AD date and some provincial Roman material. Post holes and gullies indicated the possibility that rectangular wooden buildings existed (Fox et al 1949, 63). Occupation of the main camp was estimated to have begun sometime in 1st Century BC before abandonment early in the 1st Century AD. The
upper camp was likely to have been occupied from the mid 1st Century AD. No pottery of Roman date was found during the excavation of the main camp.

Observations from LiDAR, geophysics and aerial photography, together with existing excavation records indicate that the monument may overlie earlier features. The finds assemblage held at Torquay Museum certainly includes worked flint from earlier periods. Enclosures have previously been identified by aerial photography on the lower slopes of the estuary and a possible unidentified enclosure was located from the LiDAR survey: it is likely that the monument did not exist in isolation. Analysis of field names listed in the Tithe Apportionment also indicates possible early occupation sites in the locality. Perhaps the most intriguing of these is a group of fields named ‘Fire Berry’ lying on the same ridge as Milber Camp 1.5km to the South East.

The name suggests former settlement with associated burning activity, perhaps industrial or vitrification (pers comm. Paul Martin). Suggesting contemporaneity between the elements in this estuarine
environment is obviously problematic on current dating evidence, but further fieldwork and survey may serve to highlight that Milber held a specialised purpose within a larger network of settlements. The primary intention was to use geophysics to target the field to the East, within which aerial photography has highlighted multiple features. Instead, as the main camp itself had not been the subject of geophysical survey and time was limited, survey was carried out there to assist in establishing how the interior of the monument was organised. Although structures had not been located during excavation, a section of the innermost western ditch revealed a sequence of ditch cleaning followed by silting before two separate deposition horizons of pottery. This may suggest that the central enclosure was occupied for a period before the outer enclosures were constructed. A number of explanations have been put forward for use of the multiple enclosures, but it is thought that the containment and organisation of stock was the primary motivation for construction (Fox 1964, pp141). If structures within the monument could be identified by geophysical survey, a differentiation in distribution between the enclosures might further illuminate how they were used.

The gradiometer survey of the Southern, open half of the monument was undertaken over three days in late September 2012. With one modern entrance through the central three enclosures and bracken growth extending the height of the ramparts, a line of sight from which to extend the grid from enclosure to enclosure was noticeably lacking. However, a feat of Pythagorean geometry from John Oswin of BACAS succeeded in establishing a single grid pattern for all three of the central enclosures (see Figure 4).

It became very clear when uploading the data on the first day that agricultural disturbance evident from the LiDAR data would dominate the results (see Figure 5).

The gradiometer survey indicated that the central enclosure has been heavily cultivated, removing any obvious sign of occupation or coherent structures (see Figure 6).

The Western end of the central enclosure has a lower concentration of agricultural damage, likely due to the practicalities of turning plough machinery when close to the bank of the monument. The enclosure has numerous high ferrous readings, which may be metal debris derived from casual loss during agricultural and leisure activity (a campsite once occupied the area). The underlying geology may also be influencing the result: bands of hard gravel had obviously been encountered during the construction of the Iron Age camp, limiting the depth of the ditches in some areas. The outer two enclosures also show signs of disturbance due to high ferrous material in the topsoil, especially to the East along the line of the modern permissive path where higher footfall occurs. These pathways are visible on LiDAR (see Figure 5) and on the gradiometer plot. An old iron fence runs along the edge of the third enclosure, much of this has broken down and probably dispersed into the immediate area, accounting for the high ferrous readings. Linear features running parallel with the ditches, visible in quieter areas to the West, could be derived from ditch clearing.

As time was short, resistivity and radar was only used over a test grid. The gradiometer highlighted one potential feature in grid 11 (see Figure 6) so this was chosen as the target. Although the single grid survey was inconclusive, it served to indicate that further wider resistivity survey could provide moreinformation than magnetometery. A resistivity survey of the central enclosure was undertaken in October 2012 and March 2013, the latter was undertaken in rain, thunder, hail and snow! The most prominent feature (see Figure 7) is a linear running North – South (A) in the Western part of the central
enclosure. This is not visible on the gradiometer plot. A similar, less prominent linear feature is located 20m to the East. A shallow, linear hollow is visible on the ground in the second enclosure and can be seen on the earliest aerial photography but not on the Tithe map or other early cartographic sources. In 1980 (Moxon-Browne), during a watching brief, a gully was noted crossing the road behind the projected line of the Western inner rampart. It is a possible that the feature in the resistivity plot is related to the same gully. Given the appearance, a modern origin is probable. In the South-West corner, is a possible partial ovoid feature (B) measuring 15m in diameter, which appears to underlie material eroded from the bank. This may represent a small internal enclosure or ring ditch. The trenches of the 1937 excavation fell either side of this feature and no archaeological evidence was found (Fox et al 1949, pp34). It must be strongly stated that, given the wet conditions and the very ephemeral nature of the feature, caution should be exercised when assigning such positive interpretations.

The geophysical survey was not as successful as was hoped or as valuable as some of other methodologies employed during the project. However, the results suggest that a resistivity survey could potentially be used to investigate the outer fourth enclosure and the field to the East. The interior should also be resurveyed under drier conditions.

Hegarty, C., Knight, S. and Sims, R., 2018-2019, The South Devon Coast to Dartmoor Aerial Investigation and Mapping Survey. Area 1, Haldon Ridge to Dart Valley (AI&M) (Interpretation). SDV361305.

Earthworks and cropmarks of banks and ditches of Milber Down hillfort are visible on aerial imagery taken from 1946 onwards and on digital images derived from lidar data captured between 1998 and 2017. The transcribed features made during this survey largely correspond with the earthworks shown on the First Edition Ordnance Survey map of the late 19th century and on the 2019 Ordnance Survey MasterMap. These show the hillfort to comprise three sub-rectangular enclosures with an outwork to the south and southwest, all defined by earthwork ditches and banks. Two adjoining rectilinear enclosures for possible stock are visible within the enclosed area of the outwork. Additional and previously unrecorded elements have, however, been recorded as earthworks and cropmarks. These include, for example, a continuation of the two ditches along the eastern edge of the outer two hillfort circuits on the north side of the road, with an additional slight earthwork bank along the outermost circuit on the south side of this road. Evidence of narrow counter-scarp banks are also visible along the outside edge of the inner two enclosure circuits and there is also possible evidence of a third connecting passage visible as a pale linear cropmark to the northeast.

Ordnance Survey, 2019, MasterMap 2019 (Cartographic). SDV362729.

Earthworks of the hillfort are shown on this map.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV135837Article in Serial: Peacock, D. P. S.. 1969. A Contribution to the Study of Glastonbury Ware form South-Western Britain. Antiquaries Journal. 49. Unknown. 49,51,58.
SDV135869Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1984. DAP/Z. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 8.
SDV16216Monograph: Fox, A.. 1973. South West England 3,500BC - AD600 (Revised Edition). South West England. Hardback Volume. 141-2.
SDV177352Article in Serial: Silvester, R. J.. 1979. The Relationship of First Millennium Settlement to the Upland Areas of the South West. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 37. Paperback Volume. 181-3.
SDV25123Article in Serial: Radford, C. + Radford, C. A. R.. 1949. Nineteenth Report on Ancient Monuments. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 81. A5 Hardback. 48.
SDV304192Monograph: Grinsell, L. V.. 1970. Discovering Regional Archaeology: South Western England. Discovering Regional Archaeology: South Western England. Paperback. 28.
SDV322592Monograph: Allan, J. + Timms, S. C.. 1996. Treasures of Ancient Devon. Treasures of Ancient Devon. Paperback Volume. 20.
SDV325644Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1904 - 1906. Second Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Second Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Map (Digital).
SDV336179Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1880-1899. First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map. First Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Map (Digital).
SDV336212Report - Survey: Quinnell, H.. 1998. Later Prehistoric Pottery Survey. Later Prehistoric Pottery Survey. A4 Spiral Bound.
SDV337164Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1906. 110SW. Second Edition Ordnance Survey 6 inch Map. Map (Paper).
SDV337670Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1984. DAP/DE. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 7a, 8.
SDV338169Article in Serial: Hutchinson, P. O.. 1862. On the Hill Fortresses, Tumuli, and some other Antiquities of Eastern Devon. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 18. Unknown. 64-5.
SDV339218Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1984. DAP/CQ. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 6.
SDV339521Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1984. DAP/BQ. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 2-3, 3a.
SDV339523Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1989. DAP/NC. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 9-10.
SDV340220Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1989. DAP/MG. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 1.
SDV340352Leaflet: Devon Archaeological Society. 1987. Milber Down. Field Guide. 1. Leaflet.
SDV341346Report - Survey: Timms, S. C.. 1976. The Devon Urban Survey, 1976. First Draft. Devon Committee for Rescue Archaeology Report. A4 Unbound + Digital. 138.
SDV341465Article in Monograph: Wall, J. C.. 1906. Ancient Earthworks. Victoria History of the County of Devon. Hardback Volume. 593-4.
SDV341823Article in Serial: Fox, A.. 1958. Twenty-Fourth Report on the Archaeology and Early History of Devon. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 90. A4 Hardback.
SDV342241Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2009. Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV342480Article in Serial: Keble Martin, W.. 1955. A Short History of Coffinswell. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 87. A5 Hardback. 165-190.
SDV342694Report - non-specific: English Heritage. 2009. Heritage at Risk Register 2009: South West. English Heritage Report. A4 Bound +Digital. 111.
SDV343524Correspondence: Department of Environment. 1985. Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Devon. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV343526Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1994. Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV343529Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1994. Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV343531Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1995. Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV343533Correspondence: Department of Environment. 1987. Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV343534Correspondence: Department of Environment. 1990. Proposed Works at Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell, Devon. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV343536Schedule Document: Office of Works. Milber Down Camp, Coffinswell. The Schedule of Monuments. Foolscap.
SDV343537Article in Serial: Fox, A. + Raleigh Radford, C. A. + Rogers, E. H. + Shorter, A. H.. 1949 - 1950. Report on the Excavations at Milber Down, 1937-8. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Exploration Society. IV Parts 2 and 3. Paperback Volume. 27-65.
SDV343538Article in Serial: Morris, P.. 1938. Ninth Report of the Devon Archaeological Exploration Society. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 70. A5 Hardback. 173-4.
SDV343539Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey. 1951 - 1980. SX86NE3. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
SDV343540Report - Evaluation: Mortimer, R. W.. 1991. An Archaeological Evaluation at ARC Aller Vale (Colesville) Quarry, Coffinswell, Newton Abbot, 1991. Exeter Archaeology Report. 91.27. A4 stapled + Digital. 2.
SDV343541Worksheet: Robinson, R.. 1982. Milber Down Hillfort. Department of Environment Field Monument Warden Visit. Worksheet.
SDV343542Un-published: Moxon Browne, K. E.. 1980. Milber Down: Interim Report on Excavations for a Sewer Pipeline 1980. Typescript.
SDV343543Worksheet: Timms, S. C.. 1984. Milber Down Camp. Devon County Sites and Monuments Register. Worksheet.
SDV343545Article in Serial: Fox, A.. 1952 - 1953. Hill-Slope Forts and Related Earthworks in South-West England and South Wales. Archaeological Journal. 109. Unknown. 1-22.
SDV343546Article in Serial: Moxon Browne, K. E.. 1980. Milber Down: Commercial Excavations for a Pipeline 1980. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 38. Paperback Volume. 121-3.
SDV343547Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University. 1952. CUC/HR. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. Photograph (Paper). 54.
SDV343548Article in Serial: Unknown. 1937. Interim Excavation Report. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society. 3. Unknown. 448-9.
SDV343549Article in Serial: Unknown. 1938. Interim Excavation Report. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society. 4. Unknown. 321.
SDV343550Plan - measured: Quinnell, N. V.. 1980. Milber Down Hillfort. Ordnance Survey 1:1250. A1 Folded.
SDV343551Worksheet: Unknown. Hill Fort, Early Iron Age B. Exeter Museums British Archaeology and History. Worksheet.
SDV343553Aerial Photograph: National Monuments Record. 1980. SX8869. National Monuments Record Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 1743/182,186,188,190,196,202.
SDV343555Aerial Photograph: Devon County Council. 1983. DCC/PLA. Unknown. Typescript.
SDV343556Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1989. DAP/LL. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 2-3.
SDV343559Article in Serial: Unknown. 1938. 10th Report of the Annual General Meeting. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Exploration Society. III part 2. Paperback Volume. 99.
SDV343561Article in Serial: Unknown. 1937. Report of the Annual General Meeting. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Exploration Society. III part 1. Paperback Volume. 59-60.
SDV343562Correspondence: Moxon Browne, K. E.. 1981. Milber Down 1980. Letter + Photos. Letter.
SDV343563Worksheet: Timms, S. C.. 1981. Milber Down Camp. Devon County Sites and Monuments Register. Worksheet.
SDV343564Ground Photograph: Timms, S. C.. 1978. Milber Down Camp. Devon County Council Conservation Section Collection. Photograph (Paper).
SDV343565Ground Photograph: Timms, S. C. + Griffith, F. M.. 1981. Milber Down Camp. Devon County Council Conservation Section Collection. Photograph (Paper).
SDV344777Report - non-specific: English Heritage. 2010. Heritage at Risk Register 2010: South West. English Heritage Report. Digital. 104.
SDV346129Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2011. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey. Map (Digital).
SDV346732National Monuments Record Database: National Monuments Record. 2011. 446096. National Monuments Record Database. Website.
SDV348861Worksheet: Eastwood, C.. 1984. Camp on Milberdown Hillfort. Worksheet.
SDV352344Aerial Photograph: Royal Air Force. 1946. RAF/CPE/UK/1824. Royal Air Force Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). RAF/CPE/UK/1824 RS 4196-97 04-NOV-1946.
SDV352457Monograph: Griffith, F.M. + Quinnell, H. + Wilkes, E. 2013. Hillforts of Devon. Hillforts of Devon. A4 Stapled + Digital. 3-5.
SDV355280Report - non-specific: English Heritage. 2011. Heritage at Risk Register 2011: South West. english Heritage. Digital. 109.
SDV356522Aerial Photograph: National Monument Record. 1980. NMR Film 1743. National Monument Record Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). NMR 1743/196 09-APR-1980.
SDV360332Report - Evaluation: Ellis, C. 2015. Former Milber Down Abattoir, Newton Abbot: Evaluation and Watching Brief. Cotswold Archaeology. 14604. Digital.
SDV360568Un-published: Baker, D.. 2016. Milber Down Camp, Newton Abbot. Digital.
SDV360682Monograph: Butler, J.. 2000. Peter Orlando Hutchinson's Travels in Victorian Devon. Illustrated Journals. Peter Orlando Hutchinson's Travels in Victorian Devon. Illustrated Journals. Hardback Volume. 79.
SDV361305Interpretation: Hegarty, C., Knight, S. and Sims, R.. 2018-2019. The South Devon Coast to Dartmoor Aerial Investigation and Mapping Survey. Area 1, Haldon Ridge to Dart Valley (AI&M). Historic England Research Report. Digital.
Linked documents:1
SDV361470Cartographic: Environment Agency. 1998-2017. LiDAR DTM data (1m resolution) EA: South Devon Coast to Dartmoor. Environment Agency LiDAR data. Digital. LIDAR SX8869; SX8870 Environment Agency DTM 01-JAN-1998 to 31-MAY-2017. [Mapped feature: #108727 ]
SDV361500Article in Serial: Griffith, F. M. + Wilkes, E. M.. 2011. In the Footsteps of Pioneering Women; Some Recent Work on Devon Hillforts. British Archaeological Reports. 548. Paperback Volume.
SDV361594Aerial Photograph: Devon County Council. 1989. DAP 6716. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). DAP 6716/01 23-JUN-1989 (MG).
SDV362729Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2019. MasterMap 2019. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital.
SDV363183Report - Survey: Newman, P.. 2015. Castle Plantation, Milber Down Camp, Newton Abbot, on advance of damage remediation: Survey. Southwest Landscape Investigations. Digital.
SDV47324Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1985. DAP/FE. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 5.
SDV64198Monograph: Griffith, F.. 1988. Devon's Past. An Aerial View. Devon's Past. An Aerial View. Paperback Volume. 41.
SDV7954Article in Serial: Grant, N.. 1995. The Occupation of Hillforts in Devon during the Late Roman and Post Roman Periods. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 53. Paperback Volume. 103.
SDV7958Monograph: Fox, A.. 1996. Prehistoric Hillforts in Devon. Prehistoric Hillforts in Devon. Paperback Volume. 42-3.

Associated Monuments

MDV8678Related to: Enclosure to south-East of Milber Camp (Monument)
MDV125252Related to: Extractive Pits or Quarries within Castle Plantation (Monument)
MDV56312Related to: Gulleys at Milber Down Small Camp (Monument)
MDV8651Related to: Loomweight from Milber Down Hillfort, Combeinteignhead (Find Spot)
MDV14558Related to: Medieval Building in Milber Down Hillfort, Combeinteignhead (Monument)
MDV8653Related to: Milber Down Southern Camp (Monument)
MDV8652Related to: Roman Coins from Milber Down, Combeinteignhead (Find Spot)

Associated Finds

  • FDV6624 - LITHIC IMPLEMENT (LANEBA - 2500 BC to 2001 BC)
  • FDV1775 - SHERD (Middle Iron Age - 300 BC to 101 BC)
  • FDV1774 - FIGURINE (Roman to V - 43 AD to 410 AD)

Associated Events

  • EDV7454 - Geophysical Survey, Milber Down Camp, Newton Abbot
  • EDV5936 - Archaeological Trench Evaluation at Milber Abattoir, Old Torquay Road, Milber, Newton Abbot, Devon
  • EDV7336 - Evaluation and Watching Brief: Former Milber Down Abattoir, Newton Abbot (Ref: 14604)
  • EDV7515 - The South Devon Coast to Dartmoor Aerial Investigation and Mapping (formerly NMP) Survey (Ref: ACD1748)
  • EDV8194 - Survey: Castle Plantation, Milber Down Camp, Newton Abbot, on advance of damage remediation

Date Last Edited:Sep 8 2020 1:38PM