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HER Number:MDV104080
Name:Dartmouth War Memorial

Summary

Granite memorial cross to the fallen of both World Wars and also those who have died in conflicts since 1945. The memorial stands in Royal Avenue Gardens close to the Bandstand.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 878 514
Map Sheet:SX85SE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishDartmouth
DistrictSouth Hams

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses: none recorded

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • WAR MEMORIAL (World War I to XX - 1914 AD to 2000 AD (Between))

Full description

Bluesky, 2006 - 2007, Bluesky aerial photographs 2006 - 2007 (Aerial Photograph). SDV341189.


Walls, S., 2010, The Materiality of Remembrance: Twentieth Century War Memorials in Devon, DRT001 (Post-Graduate Thesis). SDV355902.


Ordnance Survey, 2013, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV350786.

'War Meml' marked.


Brine, M. E., 2013, War Memorials (Website). SDV351333.

Dartmouth War Memorial, which stands in the Royal Avenue Gardens, was officially opened by the Prince of Wales in 1921. It commemorates the fallen of both World Wars.


Imperial War Museum, 2014, War Memorials Archive, 25559 (Website). SDV356253.

Rough-hewn granite cross mounted on a cube plinth and two-stepped octagonal stone base. Plinth bears inscriptions followed by names.
Side one: IN MEMORY OF THE MEN OF DARTMOUTH WHO DIED FOR THEIR COUNTRY 1914 - 1918.
Side two: "THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE"
Side three: IN MEMORY OF THE MEN OF DARTMOUTH WHO DIED FOR THEIR COUNTRY 1939 - 1945
Side four: IN MEMORY OF CIVILIANS WHO LOST THEIR LIVES BY ENEMY ACTION 1939 - 1945


Historic England, 2017, Dartmouth War Memorial (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV360319.

Historic England is currently considering whether the war memorial has special architectural or historic interest.
History
Throughout 1919 debate about an appropriate war memorial for Dartmouth failed to come to a conclusion that met overall public approval. Suggestions included bath and wash houses, a shelter building, a triumphal arch, an extension to the hospital, and a cross. In mid-March 1919 the decision was finally made to erect a monument on New Ground, facing the river Dart. A public meeting held in the Guildhall in late 1920 heard that £235 had been raised: those present decided to close the appeal and proceed with the project.
The memorial cross was unveiled on 18 May 1921 by the Prince of Wales, who had spent two years resident as a pupil at the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth. The ecumenical ceremony, attended by the Mayor and Corporation, military representatives and other uniformed organisations, and many local residents, was led by the local clergy. The Mayor’s chaplain dedicated the memorial, which commemorates 146 local servicemen who died in the First World War.
Following the Second World War, the details of a further 82 servicemen who lost their lives in that conflict were added, along with 35 civilians who died as a result of enemy action. More recently, a stone commemorating service personnel who have died since 1945, in China, Malaya, and Afghanistan, has been added.
Details
MATERIALS: Granite.
DESCRIPTION: The granite memorial stands in Royal Avenue Gardens, in close proximity to the Grade II-listed Bandstand, and other listed buildings that surround New Ground and the Boat Float. The c5m tall plain Latin cross rises from a slightly shouldered pedestal, square on plan, which stands on a two-stepped octagonal base. The inscriptions on the memorial are all in applied metal letters.
The principal dedicatory inscription on the front face of the pedestal reads IN MEMORY OF THE MEN OF DARTMOUTH/ WHO DIED FOR THEIR COUNTRY, 1914 – 1918/ (NAMES). The listed names continue on the rear face, headed “THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE.” To one side the Second World War dedication reads IN MEMORY OF THE MEN OF DARTMOUTH/ WHO DIED FOR THEIR COUNTRY, 1939 – 1945/ (NAMES). The fourth side, which includes a simple representation of a plain Latin cross, reads IN MEMORY OF CIVILIANS WHO LOST/ THEIR LIVES BY ENEMY ACTION 1939 – 45/ (NAMES).
A small wedge-shaped granite block, placed on the top step of the base and butting the pedestal’s fourth face, reads IN MEMORY OF THOSE WHO HAVE DIED FOR/ THEIR COUNTRY IN CONFLICTS SINCE 1945/ (3 NAMES).


Historic England, 2017, Dartmouth War Memorial Cross, Royal Avenue Gardens, The Quay, Dartmouth, Devon (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV360474.

Notification that the war memorial has been added to the List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest.


Historic England, 2017, National Heritage List for England, 1449537 (National Heritage List for England). SDV359963.

Dartmouth War Memorial Cross.
Summary of Building

First World War memorial granite cross, unveiled 1921, with additions for later conflicts..

Reasons for Designation
Dartmouth War Memorial Cross, which stands in Royal Avenue Gardens, is listed at Grade II for the following principal reasons:
Historic interest:
* As an eloquent witness to the tragic impact of world events on this local community, and the sacrifice it made in the conflicts of the C20 and C21. Architectural interest:
* A simple yet eloquent war memorial, in granite.
Group value:
* With the listed Bandstand (Grade II), The Butterwalk (Grade I), The Boat Float (Grade II), and numerous Grade II and Grade II*-listed buildings on The Quay.
History
The aftermath of the First World War saw the biggest single wave of public commemoration ever with tens of thousands of memorials erected across England. This was the result of both the huge impact on communities of the loss of three quarters of a million British lives, and also the official policy of not repatriating the dead: therefore the memorials provided the main focus of the grief felt at this great loss. One such memorial was raised in Dartmouth as a permanent testament to the sacrifices made by the members of the local community.
Throughout 1919 debate about an appropriate war memorial for Dartmouth failed to come to a conclusion that met overall public approval. Suggestions included bath and wash houses, a shelter building, a triumphal arch, an extension to the hospital, and a cross. In mid-March 1919 the decision was finally made to erect a monument on New Ground, facing the river Dart. A public meeting held in the Guildhall in late 1920 heard that £235 had been raised; those present decided to close the appeal and proceed with the project.
The memorial cross was unveiled on 18 May 1921 by the Prince of Wales, who had spent two years resident as a pupil at the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth. The ecumenical ceremony, attended by the Mayor and Corporation, military representatives and other uniformed organisations, and many local residents, was led by the local clergy. The Mayor’s chaplain dedicated the memorial, which commemorates 146 local servicemen who died in the First World War.
Following the Second World War the details of a further 82 servicemen who lost their lives in that conflict were added, along with 35 civilians who died as a result of enemy action. More recently, a stone commemorating service personnel who have died since 1945, in China, Malaya and Afghanistan, has been added.
Details
MATERIALS: granite.
DESCRIPTION: the granite memorial stands in Royal Avenue Gardens, in close proximity to the Grade II-listed Bandstand, and other listed buildings that surround New Ground and the Boat Float. The c5m tall plain Latin cross rises from a slightly shouldered pedestal, square on plan, which stands on a two-stepped octagonal base. The inscriptions on the memorial are all in applied metal letters.
The principal dedicatory inscription on the front face of the pedestal reads IN MEMORY OF THE MEN OF DARTMOUTH/ WHO DIED FOR THEIR COUNTRY, 1914 – 1918/ (NAMES). The listed names continue on the rear face, headed “THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE.” To one side the Second World War dedication reads IN MEMORY OF THE MEN OF DARTMOUTH/ WHO DIED FOR THEIR COUNTRY, 1939 – 1945/ (NAMES). The fourth side, which includes a simple representation of a plain Latin cross, reads IN MEMORY OF CIVILIANS WHO LOST/ THEIR LIVES BY ENEMY ACTION 1939 – 45/ (NAMES).
A small wedge-shaped granite block, placed on the top step of the base and butting the pedestal’s fourth face, reads IN MEMORY OF THOSE WHO HAVE DIED FOR/ THEIR COUNTRY IN CONFLICTS SINCE 1945/ (3 NAMES).
Date first listed: 12th October 2017

Sources / Further Reading

SDV341189Aerial Photograph: Bluesky. 2006 - 2007. Bluesky aerial photographs 2006 - 2007. Bluesky. Photograph (Digital). [Mapped feature: #63549 ]
SDV350786Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2013. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital.
SDV351333Website: Brine, M. E.. 2013. War Memorials. http://www.devonheritage.org/WarMemorials.htm. Website.
SDV355902Post-Graduate Thesis: Walls, S.. 2010. The Materiality of Remembrance: Twentieth Century War Memorials in Devon. University of Exeter. Digital. DRT001.
SDV356253Website: Imperial War Museum. 2014. War Memorials Archive. www.ukniwm.org.uk. Website. 25559.
SDV359963National Heritage List for England: Historic England. 2017. National Heritage List for England. Historic Houses Register. Digital. 1449537.
SDV360319List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Historic England. 2017. Dartmouth War Memorial. Assess Building for Designation. Digital.
SDV360474List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Historic England. 2017. Dartmouth War Memorial Cross, Royal Avenue Gardens, The Quay, Dartmouth, Devon. Notification of Addition to List. Digital.

Associated Monuments: none recorded

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:Oct 20 2017 8:32AM