HeritageGateway - Home
Site Map
Text size: A A A
You are here: Home > > > > Devon & Dartmoor HER Result
Devon & Dartmoor HERPrintable version | About Devon & Dartmoor HER | Visit Devon & Dartmoor HER online...

See important guidance on the use of this record.

If you have any comments or new information about this record, please email us.


HER Number:MDV107201
Name:East Teignmouth

Summary

An estate charter of 1044 shows that East Teignmouth overlay the Saxon settlement. It is first recorded as a borough in 1311 but prior to this, in 1253 it was granted a market and fair but the Dean and Chapter of Exeter, Lords of the manor at that time. Dawlish Street was the principal street in the medieval period when settlement was restricted to a small area around the church. Present day Teignmouth is the amalgamation of the two parishes of West and East Teignmouth with resort development infilling between the two settlements. Teignmouth is one of Devon's oldest and best known seaside towns although its role as a seaport, fishing and market town preceded that of a resort and these functions continue to be important today.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 943 730
Map Sheet:SX97SW
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishTeignmouth
DistrictTeignbridge

Protected Status: none recorded

Other References/Statuses: none recorded

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • SETTLEMENT (Founded, Saxon - 701 AD to 1065 AD (Between))

Full description

Timms, S. C., 1976, The Devon Urban Survey, 1976. First Draft, 181, 185, 186-7, 194 (Report - Survey). SDV341346.

An estate charter of 1044 shows that East Teignmouth overlay the Saxon settlement. It is first recorded as a borough in 1311 but prior to this, in 1253 it was granted a market and fair but the Dean and Chapter of Exeter, Lords of the manor at that time. Dawlish Street was the principal street in the medieval period when settlement was restricted to a small area around the church. The medieval market was probably in the vicinity of St. Michael's Church which served as the chapel in the borough during the medieval period.
The modern town of Teignmouth is the product of the 19th century amalgamation of the two separate medieval boroughs of East and West Teignmouth which were divided by the Tame River; the parishes were joined together in 1909. However, the two boroughs had long been amalgamated physically and were often referred to as the single settlement, Teignmouth.
Map object approximate based on this source.


Devon County Council + Teignbridge District Council, 1994, Teignmouth Townscape Assessment, 4-5, 16-17 (Report - Assessment). SDV351926.

East Teignmouth is distinctly located between the cliffs and the sand spur of the estuary and can claim to be the oldest part of Teignmouth. A chapel dedicated to St. Michael was established in the 11th century and a market and fair were granted in 1253. Present day Teignmouth is the amalgamation of the two parishes of West and East Teignmouth with resort development infilling between the two settlements.


Exeter Archaeology, 2004, Archaeological Assessment of Proposed Fire Station on Land off the A379 Teignmouth, Devon (Report - Assessment). SDV361709.

At the time of the Domesday Survey, East and West Teignmouth were parts of the two estates of Dawlish and Bishopsteignton respectively, both owned by the bishop of Exeter. St Michael’s Church and by implication a settlement at East Teignmouth is mentioned in a Saxon charter of 1044, but there is no documentary evidence for a Saxon settlement at West Teignmouth.
The right to a Saturday market and yearly fair in East Teignmouth was granted in 1253 and it is referred to as a borough by circa 1311. The position regarding West Teignmouth is less clear. A charter of 1256 was renewed by Henry III in 1270, granting the Bishop a Thursday market and three day fair over the feast of St James in Teynton. This could refer to Bishopsteignton or to West Teignmouth where the parish church is dedicated to St James. West Teignmouth is regarded as a borough in the taxation of Pope Nicholas IV in 1292.
The two settlements were divided by the Brimley or Tame Brook which followed the approximate line of Station Road. They were two separate parishes until 1909.
West Teignmouth was granted to Andrew Dudley in 1549, from whom it passed to the Cecils. It was bought by Richard Martyn in 1614 before passing by marriage to the Clifford family. East Teignmouth remained with the Dean and Chapter of Exeter until 1803 and subsequently to the Courtenay family.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV341346Report - Survey: Timms, S. C.. 1976. The Devon Urban Survey, 1976. First Draft. Devon Committee for Rescue Archaeology Report. A4 Unbound + Digital. 181, 185, 186-7, 194.
SDV351926Report - Assessment: Devon County Council + Teignbridge District Council. 1994. Teignmouth Townscape Assessment. Devon County Council + Teignbridge District Council. A4 Unbound + Digital. 4-5, 16-17.
SDV361709Report - Assessment: Exeter Archaeology. 2004. Archaeological Assessment of Proposed Fire Station on Land off the A379 Teignmouth, Devon. Exeter Archaeology. 04.23. A4 Stapled + Digital.

Associated Monuments

MDV108706Part of: Teignmouth (Monument)
MDV21827Related to: Borough of East Teignmouth (Monument)
MDV55019Related to: East Teignmouth Medieval Market Place (Monument)
MDV9878Related to: St Michael's Church, Teignmouth (Building)
MDV16268Related to: West Teignmouth (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:Sep 6 2018 1:57PM