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HER Number:MDV11222
Name:Newenham Abbey

Summary

The upstanding and buried remains of an abbey of the Cistercian order, occupied between 1246 and 1539. Traditional monastic plan of a church and three ranges of two-storied buildings grouped around a central open square cloister.

Location

Grid Reference:SY 287 973
Map Sheet:SY29NE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishAxminster
DistrictEast Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishAXMINSTER

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SY29NE/14
  • Old SAM County Ref: 354(PART)
  • Old SAM Ref: 24843
  • Royal Albert Memorial Museum Accession Number: 55/2007

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • ABBEY (XIII to Late Medieval - 1247 AD to 1539 AD (Between))

Full description

National Monuments Record, SY2897 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342803.

Polwhele, R., 1793-1806, The History of Devonshire, 291 (Monograph). SDV21030.

Swete, J., 1795, 564M/9/119,123 Illustrations by Swete (Record Office Collection). SDV342769.

Description of remains in 1795, apparently part of the refectory and portions of north and south walls of the nave. Two watercolours.

Lysons, D. + Lysons, S., 1822, Magna Britannica, 22 (Monograph). SDV323771.

Davidson, J., 1830, Collections for Axminster and District (Record Office Collection). SDV342763.

Davidsons manuscript collection includes transcripts of contemporary documents and an account of his trial excavations in 1827/8.

Davidson, J., 1832, History of Axminster (Record Office Collection). SDV342764.

Some further information in manuscript history of Axminster.

Davidson, J., 1843, Untitled Source (Monograph). SDV342762.

Full history given in book. Traces the progress of building as recorded in the cartulary (written mid 14th century). The church was built in the 2nd half of 13th century and cloisters during the 14th century. Other details: Photocopy of plan (plate 3) in parish file.

Oliver, G., 1846, Monasticon Diocesis Exoniensis, 357-370 (Monograph). SDV57424.

Twenty contemporary documents transcribed including lists of abbots and knights buried at the abbey. Brief history.

Rowe, J. B., 1877, Cistercian Houses of Devon: Newenham, 361-79 (Article in Serial). SDV342791.

Birch, W. G., 1892, On Three Lists of Monasteries Compiled in 13th Century (Article in Serial). SDV131388.

Possible evidence for the abbey's foundation in 1246 occurs in the Cottonian manuscript in the British Museum.

Gasquet, F. A., 1893, Untitled Source, 90 (Monograph). SDV342782.

Rowe, J. B., 1897, Cistercian Houses in Devon: Part 6, 371-6 (Article in Serial). SDV342792.

Gover, J. E. B. + Mawer, A. + Stenton, F. M., 1931, The Place-Names of Devon: Part One, 634 (Monograph). SDV1312.

According to English Place Name Society, the site of the Domesday manor of Alreford could identify with the site of Newenham Abbey.

Wilkin, W. H., 1932 - 1933, Old Windows at Axminster, 218-219, 278-279 (Article in Serial). SDV124412.

The Abbey was possessed of a deerpark in 13th century. A number of granges are known to have been associated with Newenham Abbey: at Breweshayes, Furzley, Beavor, and Shapwick. Various architectural fragments from Newenham Abbey have been noted in houses in and around Axminster.

Rose-Troup, D., 1936 - 1937, Cartularies of Religious Houses in Devon, 142-144 (Article in Serial). SDV256423.

Extracts of the cartulary of Newenham Abbey are in the British museum at the time of writing while a transcript of it made by J. Davidson is in the city library, Exeter.

Rose-Troup, F., 1936 - 1937, Lead from the Dissolved Religious Houses in Devon in 1549, 122-6 (Article in Serial). SDV7422.

Everett, A. W., 1937, Newenham Abbey (Correspondence). SDV342795.

Everett, A. W., 1937, Newenham Abbey (Cistercian) Axminster (Plan - measured). SDV358655.

Everett, A. W., 1937, Untitled Source (Correspondence). SDV358640.

Everett, A. W., 1938 - 1939, Newenham Abbey, 97-100 (Article in Serial). SDV342768.

Visited in1937. Remains of the abbey now incorporated in two farms, Lower Abbey Farm and Higher Abbey Farm, the latter of which has only a fragment of a medieval barn. The abbey consisted of a church, with cloisters to the south, now represented by the yard of Lower Abbey Farm. Scanty remains of the refectory, kitchen, dormitory, rere dortar and abbot's residence can be seen.

Royal Air Force, 1948, CPE/UK 2431, 4197-8 (Aerial Photograph). SDV338615.

Other details: HER 39/70-71.

Cambridge University, 1949, CUC/CF, 19-20 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342760.

Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, 1953 - 1980, SY29NE4 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV342770.

Visited 14/10/1953. About 1823, Lysons noted that "there are scarcely any remains of monastic buildings, some of which were pulled down a few years ago".

Hoskins, W. G., 1954, A New Survey of England: Devon, 324-5 (Monograph). SDV17562.

Ministry of Works, 1955, Newenham Abbey (Schedule Document). SDV342773.

Visited 16/11/1955. The remains are scattered among farm buildings. The walls are principally of limestone rubble - very little remains of the dressings.
The schedulable parts are: a) Site of the church, with part of the south (?) wall of the nave, with rubble arcading.
b) Site of the east Range, covered with irregular mounds.
c) Remains of the Frater (refectory) with the block adjoining to the west, which has two splayed and casped two light 15th century windows. Other details: Map.

Department of Environment, 1960, Axminster RD, 1-2 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV342796.

The remains of the abbey are so mixed up with farm buildings it is difficult to identify them with any certainty. The following buildings are listed: Lower Abbey Farmhouse (incorporating part of the west cloistral range), the outbuilding to the north of it (incorporating part of the north wall of the church), the outbuilding to the south of the farmhouse (refectory), and the grass covered foundations of the east range.

Stephan, J., 1963, Presidential Address: Devon Cistercians in English Literature, 26 (Article in Serial). SDV241993.

Youings, J., 1965 - 1967, Monastic Wool Sales, 71-2 (Article in Serial). SDV342767.

Medieval wool sales discussed.

Cambridge University, 1970, CUC/BCB, 67 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342778.

Knowles, D. + Hadcock, R. N., 1971, Medieval Religious Houses: England and Wales, 113, 123 (Monograph). SDV323253.

Newenham Abbey. Cistercian house founded 1247 from Beaulieu, dissolved 1539. Severely affected by the black death in 1349 when 20 monks died, leaving an abbot and 2 monks alive.

Sylvester, R. J., 1977, Newenham Abbey, Axminster (Worksheet). SDV342765.

Visited between 14th and 24th April 1977. Although scheduling took place in 1955, the owner had no knowledge of this and constructed a barn on the site of the church. Foundations of stone walls and robber trenches were observed in the stanchion holes, and a number of architectural fragments and tiles were recovered. Other details: FSO Dev File No 32.

Unknown, 1977, Untitled Source (Worksheet). SDV358643.

Webster, L. E. + Cherry, J., 1978, Medieval Britain in 1977, 156 (Article in Serial). SDV342785.

Work on the site of the Cistercian abbey church by R. Silvester for Devon Committee for Rescue Archaeology revealed pits for the erection of barn stanchions, which contained glazed floor-tiles, architectural fragments and some Roman tiles; a small group of decorated tiles was found in situ. Scanty remains of the nave walls and robber trenches cut by the pits were recorded.

Unknown, 1978, Unknown (Article in Serial). SDV131638.

Timms, S. C., 1980, Newenham Abbey (Worksheet). SDV358647.

Timms, S. C., 1980, Newenham Abbey, Axminster (Worksheet). SDV342798.

Other details: Plan.

Timms, S. C., 1980, Newnham Abbey, Axminster (Un-published). SDV358645.

Timms, S. C., 1981, Annotated Plan Showing Scheduled Area, Outbuildings Demolished in 1981 and Remains of Medieval Barn (Plan - measured). SDV358650.

Devon County Council, 1981, Newenham Abbey (Ground Photograph). SDV342797.

Other details: Film 496.

Devon County Council, 1981, Newenham Abbey, Axminster, 11-12 (Ground Photograph). SDV342781.

Other details: Film 476.

Allan, J. P. + Silvester, R.J., 1981, Newenham Abbey, Axminster, 159-171 (Article in Serial). SDV342766.

The history of the abbey is well documented (see Davidson, Oliver, and Brooking Rowe). Many buildings seem to have been demolished at the time of the dissolution, probably to provide stone for Ash House. The process of demolition has continued to the present day. The remains of the refectory and kitchen in the south range were demolished a few years after scheduling. Subsequent to the building of the barn in 1977, a lean-to barn was added to its north-east, and the area in front of these (i.e. The church nave) was levelled and concreted without prior warning to any official archaeological body. Parts of the north and west cloister walls are all that remain visible. This article contains a plan of the monastic buildings as known in 1843, 1938, and 1977-80. Other details: Offprint in parish file.

Department of Environment, 1983, Axminster, 1-2 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV117703.

Relisted 1983; Higher Abbey Farmhouse and outbuilding incorporating part of church only.

Griffith, F. M., 1984, DAP/BX, 9-10 (Aerial Photograph). SDV131277.

Devon County Council, 1984, Newenham Abbey, 19-25 (Ground Photograph). SDV342780.

Other details: Film 620.

Griffiths, D. M., 1985, An Archaeological Survey of Newenham Abbey, Axminster, Devon, 3-4 (Report - Survey). SDV342771.

Post dissolution documents suggest there was a farmhouse on the site by the beginning of the 17th century, occupying (as today) the west side of the cloister, whereas other parts of the abbey remained as ruins or "heaps of stones". During the19th century the surviving portion of the north wall of the church and the refectory collapsed or were demolished, and during the last 20 years, two buildings forming part of the south side of the cloister. Other details: Plans.

Morris, J., 1985, Domesday Book: Devon (Part Two) (Monograph). SDV249.

Reginald de Mohun gave the manor of Axminster for the foundation of Newenham Abbey. Other details: Note 1.11.

Unknown, 1985, Newenham Abbey (Ground Photograph). SDV342789.

Unknown, 1986 - 1987, Devon Religious Houses Survey (Un-published). SDV347681.

Weddell, P. J. + Holbrook, N., 1987, A35 Axminster By-pass Report on Trial Archaeological Excavations and Documentary Research 1987, 4 (Report - Assessment). SDV99942.

Griffith, F. M., 1988, DAP/KH, 8a-10 (Aerial Photograph). SDV112469.

Goodyear, R. I., 1990, Domesday Manor (Worksheet). SDV358623.

Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J., 1990, Historic Landscape Assessment of Higher Bruckland Possible Reservoir Site and Six Reservoir Service Areas in the Axe Valley, 7; Figure 12 (Report - Assessment). SDV351551.

As the early 17th-century name implies, Abbey Gate must have been the site of the original entrance gate to Newenham Abbey which lies 550 metres to the north-west. The Cartulery of Newenham Abbey states that a cross was erected at the entrance to the Abbey in 1347 near the 'Bishop's Bridge'. This is likely to refer to the so-called Abbey Gate Bridge.

Goodyear, R. I., 1990, Place Name of Newenham (Worksheet). SDV342787.

Variations of place name during 13th century. Known as Newenham by 1406.

Weddell, P. J., 1991, Archaeological Appraisal of Potential Development Areas in Axminster and its Environs, 4 (Report - Assessment). SDV99927.

Adkins, L. + Adkins, R., 1992, Land South of Abbey Close, Axminster, Devon (Report - Assessment). SDV342775.

It is possible that remains of Medieval date relating to Newenham Abbey survive on the Horslears farmstead. Similarly it is possible that Medieval remains relating to the abbey lie elsewhere within the assessment area. Other details: 5.7.

Weddell, P. J. + Reed, S. J. + Simpson, S. J., 1993, Excavation of the Exeter-Dorchester Roman Road at the River Yarty and the Roman Fort Ditch and Settlement Site at Woodbury, Near Axminster., 88 (Article in Serial). SDV99887.

Gibbons, P., 1993, Newenham Abbey, 134675 (Un-published). SDV342772.

In 1955 most of the nucleus of the site of the abbey was scheduled as an Ancient Monument, and in 1960 four parts of Lower Abbey Farm were listed as Historic Buildings. At some point in the following years the surviving upstanding remains of the kitchen and frater (dining hall) were demolished. In 1977 a barn was erected over the site of the crossing and presbytery of the church, necessitating salvage recording. Immediately following this, the area in front of the barn was concreted, during which the remains of the nave arcade foundation were levelled, and a burial was exposed. The remains of the monastic barn were demolished in 1980/1. Between 1977 and 1985 parts of the pulpitum wall were removed, and in 1988/9 the remainder was demolished. There are no accurate and comprehensive plans of the monument and no detailed record of the remaining fabric. The following are listed as Grade II historic buildings: Lower Abbey Farmhouse, the south wall of the nave, and Higher Abbey Farmhouse. Other details: NEWN-AI.TXT.

Claydon, G., 1994, Newenham Abbey (Correspondence). SDV342777.

Claydon, G., 1994, Some Theories Concerning the Possible Origins, at Present U:nknown, of Axminster Saxon Church, Newenham Abbey and the Battle of Brunenburgh (Un-published). SDV358633.

Department of National Heritage, 1995, Newenham Abbey (Schedule Document). SDV342774.

Newenham Abbey is situated to the south-east of Axminster in agricultural land on the east edge of the wide floodplain of the River Axe. It includes the upstanding and buried remains of an abbey of the Cistercian order in occupation from 1246 until 1539.
The abbey conforms to the traditional monastic plan in which a church and three ranges of two-storied buildings were grouped around the central open square court of the cloister, with ancillary buildings farther from the nucleus. The visible remains exist as ruined and adapted structures consisting of parts of the abbey church and west range incorporated into the buildings of Lower Abbey Farm. The buried remains are far more extensive and include a barn and chapel beneath the buildings of Higher Abbey Farm. A small stream flows past the site and north-west to the Axe.
The walls are of coursed rubble construction with fine ashlar quoins, utilising local limestone. Architectural mouldings are in limestone and a grey lias, which would have produced a polychrome effect in the original structures.
The layout of the nucleus of the abbey has been reconstructed from a number of field observations and documentary sources. The cloister stood to the south of the church and had sides of some 36 metres square. Documentary evidence suggests that the cloister-walks were enclosed on their inner sides.
The 13th century abbey church was of cruciform plan, aligned east-west, and over 80 metres long, with a nave 23 metres wide, and evidently aisled on both sides. The transepts were about 19 metres wide and were aisled on their east sides to each accommodate three chapels. This layout indicates that the church had a narrow presbytery, a design that was in general outmoded with the Cistercians in the 13th century. A substantial section of the s wall of the nave is incorporated into the modern farm buildings. It is about 14.1 metres long and survives to a height of 3.8 metres. It contains two large recesses with round arches, 2.4 metres wide, and 0.9 metres deep in a total wall thickness of about 1.3 metres. They retain some fine ashlar quoins, and the remains on the west side of a third recess indicates that these features were evenly spaced along the outer face of the nave, providing seats and/or storage space in the north cloister walk. The west end of the nave wall has a return to the south which forms the east wall of the west range. The nave arcades were constructed on substantial foundations, probably to assist in the support of a tower above the crossing. The pulpitum (screen between the nave and the monks quire) was also built on a substantial wall, which may be the relic of an intermediate phase of construction. A burial has been uncovered in the interior of the church, and at least part of the floor was tiled.
A substantial section of the east wall of the west range of the cloister survives as the east wall of the farmhouse of Lower Abbey Farm. It is 1.3 metres thick, and extends the entire length of the house (circa.19 metres), and apparently its full height of 2 stories. The wall contains a square-headed moulded doorway, 1 metre wide, and now blocked, which is visible inside the rear porch of the house. The doorway has been interpreted as leading from the cloister into the monks parlour, the only room in the abbey in which conversation was permitted. It is probable that some of the transverse walls within the farmhouse incorporate medieval fabric. The west range appears to have been about 60 metres long, with its north end abutting the south wall of the nave of the church. On the evidence of the buildings of the south range, the west range would have been about 9 metres in overall width. In addition to the parlour, the ground floor of the range was traditionally used in part for storage. The first floor would have contained the dorter (dormitory) of the lay brothers.
To the east of the cloister, the site of the south transept and east range is visible as an area of uneven ground in a pasture field. The chapter house appears to have been some 19 metres wide; the remainder of the range would have been narrower. Antiquarian investigations have established that the chapter house had a paved floor and a vaulted ceiling. Traditionally this range would have also contained the sacristy (vestry), and the monks dorter on the upper floor.
The recorded remains of the south range include a kitchen, located at the west end, which was 15 metres by 9 metres, and contained two fireplaces and late 14th or early 15th century windows; and the refectory (dining hall), of some 25 metres by 9 metres, adjacent to the kitchen, with its long axis at right-angles to the cloister, and with diagonal buttresses at its outer corners. This arrangement of kitchen and refectory is a characteristic Cistercian design. Another characteristic Cistercian feature is that both east and west ranges extend to the south of the cloister and south range. The reredorters (toilets) would have been in the close vicinity of their associated dorters (dormitories).
The cultivated field to the south-east of the cloister has produced building debris, and may contain the site of the lay brothers reredorter. Traditionally, the infirmary would have been located to the east of the east range, and this area has also produced building debris.
The main water source was the stream running north-west to the Axe. In the vicinity of the abbey the present course of the stream is artificial; from the topography it appears that its original course was in the area of the south range. The stream would have been culverted to the east of the cloister, probably in a series of channels designed to separate fresh water for the kitchens and lavatoria (washing places), and then utilise the water flow for conducting foul water from the reredorters (toilets) to the river. A culverted drain runs east beneath the kitchen, formerly the dairy, of Lower Abbey Farm, and an arched drain has been recorded to the immediate east of the refectory. In the post-medieval period the lack of maintenance to the monastic water courses probably led to flooding at the south end of the farm, which resulted in the stream being re-channelled. This involved making a deep cutting into the rising land to the north-east of the church in order to avoid the debris and foundations of the ruins. A further diversion of the stream appears to have resulted from the construction of the railway embankment in the 19th century. Traditionally the monastic graveyard was located to the immediate north or north-east of the church, and reports of bones being found in the banks of the stream in this location, confirm both this assumption and that the stream has been diverted. Part of a stone wall, 0.8 metres thick and aligned north/south, was observed in the north bank of the stream at the point where it turns west around the north of the church. This may be the eastern boundary of the graveyard. The depth of the wall indicates that at least part of the profile of the higher ground to the north-east of the church is artificial.
The land forming the monastic precinct was traditionally enclosed behind a wall. Documentary sources state that in the mid 13th century the conventual buildings were enclosed with a moat. There are no visible earthworks to give any indication of this feature.
The precinct enclosed all the buildings and structures, both agricultural and industrial, associated with the degree of self sufficiency that the abbey was capable of sustaining. Many of these would have been of timber or cob construction. At Newenham the monastic tithe barn was located some 150 metres to the south of the cloister. It was about 30 metres by 9 metres with external porches in the centres of its longest sides, with a chamfered plinth and quoins in limestone ashlar. The chapel stood to the south of the barn, on the opposite side of the farm track. It was aligned approximately east-west and was about 13 metres by 7 metres overall. The presence of a chapel in this location is important. Cistercian abbeys frequently included a separate place of worship for lay people, and this was often located near a gatehouse. It is possible that the remains of a gatehouse exist in the area of Higher Abbey Farm. The abbey was founded in 1246 by Reginald and William de Mohun following their granting of land to the Cistercian order. It was colonised by monks from Beaulieu abbey in Hampshire, and dedicated to St Mary. A copy of the Cartulary exists for the period 1246 to the mid 14th century which, together with the Register of the Bishops of Exeter, outlines some events in the construction of the abbey: Bishop Bronescombe (1257-80) presented six altars to the church; in 1270 three altars on the north side were consecrated, and in 1277 three altars on the south side, and the high altar, were consecrated. In 1304 the warming-house had been built, and a bakehouse was completed together with a section of the cloister walk enclosure. Between 1325 and 1328 further sections of the cloister walk, including one towards the infirmary and lavatoria (washing place), were enclosed. In 1333 the sanctuary was refloored. Between 1338 and 1361 a new refectory was completed and a vaulted ceiling constructed in the warming-house. In the period 1250-57, it is recorded that the conventual buildings were enclosed with a moat.
The abbey gained substantially in wealth from grants of land, and in the manner of the Cistercian order set up at least four grange farms, in addition to the home farm, for the utilisation of its estates. On the eve of the Black Death in 1348 the abbey supported 23 monks, which the plague reduced by 20 monks, 3 lay brothers, and 88 secular persons living within the precinct. The abbey was dissolved in 1539. A condition of the subsequent sale of the buildings was that they were to be rendered unfit for monastic use. This was greatly assisted by the Crown's sequestration of the roofing lead, although Newenham is reported at this time as being roofed with slate and tile. Following their disposal by the Crown, parts of the buildings were often converted to habitable use, and this pattern was followed at Newenham. The ruins were exploited as a convenient source of high quality building stone and architectural fragments are built into a number of houses in Axminster. In 1539 the abbey was granted by the crown to the Duke of Suffolk, and at the beginning of the 17th century was acquired by the Petre family. By 1605 a house was in existence on the site, and a map of 1616 shows the house on the site of the present farmhouse, together with the frater (dining hall), west part of the south range, and south part of the west range in use as buildings, and the outline of the chapter house. The map also shows the barn and chapel to the south of the abbey. Parts of the ruins of the abbey were recorded by Swete in 1795. In 1797 most of the barn was destroyed by fire. In 1827/8 Davidson excavated within the chapter house and revealed a paved floor with an in situ column base, and recovered a quantity of architectural fragments. A plan and description were made by Davidson in 1843. The chapel did not exist after 1861. In 1937 Everett made a plan of the ruins which illustrated the loss of fabric since 1843. The scheduling comprises one area enclosing what is currently recognised as the extent of the abbey. Other details: Map.

Devon County Council, 1995, Newenham Abbey, 1A-14A (Ground Photograph). SDV342779.

Other details: Film 621.

Claydon, G., 1996, Newenham Abbey (Correspondence). SDV342776.

Enclosed photographs of watercolour of Newenham Abbey and of Cartulery in British Museum.

Hollinrake, C. + Hollinrake, N., 2001, An Archaeological and Historical Desk Top Study of Land at Musbury Road, Axminster, 13-14 (Report - Assessment). SDV320907.

Exeter Archaeology, 2003-2004, East Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Archaeological Survey, Site No. 1155 (Archive - Survey). SDV351568.

Newenham Abbey. Cistercian house founded in 1247 from Beaulieu dissolved 1539. Parts of the remaining structures are incorporated into the buildings of Lower Abbey Farm and buried remains, including those of the church and monastic graveyard, chapel, cloister and tithe barn lie beneath and around Lower and Higher Abbey Farms. The site is a Scheduled Monument.
SMR.

Robinson, D. M. + Harrison, S., 2006, Cistercian Cloisters in England and Wales. Part 1, 177-178 (Article in Serial). SDV361751.

Newenham, Devon 1247-1539. Summary south; partial form of garth known only from antiquarian observation; nothing known of arcades (citing Robinson, Cistercian Abbeys of Britain, 155).

English Heritage, 2009, Heritage at Risk Register 2009: South West, 95 (Report - non-specific). SDV342694.

Extensive significant problems, i.e. under plough, collapse.

English Heritage, 2010, Heritage at Risk Register 2010: South West, 86 (Report - non-specific). SDV344777.

English Heritage, 2011, Heritage at Risk Register 2011: South West, 88 (Report - non-specific). SDV355280.

Extensive significant problems, i.e. under plough, collapse. Declining.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV112469Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1988. DAP/KH. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 8a-10.
SDV117703List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1983. Axminster. Historic Houses Register. A4 Comb Bound. 1-2.
SDV124412Article in Serial: Wilkin, W. H.. 1932 - 1933. Old Windows at Axminster. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 17. A4 Hardback. 218-219, 278-279.
SDV1312Monograph: Gover, J. E. B. + Mawer, A. + Stenton, F. M.. 1931. The Place-Names of Devon: Part One. The Place-Names of Devon: Part One. VIII. A5 Hardback. 634.
SDV131277Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1984. DAP/BX. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 9-10.
SDV131388Article in Serial: Birch, W. G.. 1892. On Three Lists of Monasteries Compiled in 13th Century. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 28. Unknown.
SDV131638Article in Serial: Unknown. 1978. Unknown. Pulman's Weekly News. Unknown. Newspaper/Magazine Cuttin.
SDV17562Monograph: Hoskins, W. G.. 1954. A New Survey of England: Devon. A New Survey of England: Devon. A5 Hardback. 324-5.
SDV21030Monograph: Polwhele, R.. 1793-1806. The History of Devonshire. The History of Devonshire. Unknown. 291.
SDV241993Article in Serial: Stephan, J.. 1963. Presidential Address: Devon Cistercians in English Literature. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 95. A5 Hardback. 26.
SDV249Monograph: Morris, J.. 1985. Domesday Book: Devon (Part Two). Domesday Book: Devon (Part Two). 9. A5 Hardback.
SDV256423Article in Serial: Rose-Troup, D.. 1936 - 1937. Cartularies of Religious Houses in Devon. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 19. Unknown. 142-144.
SDV320907Report - Assessment: Hollinrake, C. + Hollinrake, N.. 2001. An Archaeological and Historical Desk Top Study of Land at Musbury Road, Axminster. Hollinrake Report. 230. A4 Stapled + Digital. 13-14.
SDV323253Monograph: Knowles, D. + Hadcock, R. N.. 1971. Medieval Religious Houses: England and Wales. Medieval Religious Houses: England and Wales. Unknown + Digital (part). 113, 123.
SDV323771Monograph: Lysons, D. + Lysons, S.. 1822. Magna Britannica. Magna Britannica: A Concise Topographical Account of The Several Counties o. 6: Devonshire. Unknown. 22.
SDV338615Aerial Photograph: Royal Air Force. 1948. CPE/UK 2431. Royal Air Force Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 4197-8.
SDV342694Report - non-specific: English Heritage. 2009. Heritage at Risk Register 2009: South West. English Heritage Report. A4 Bound +Digital. 95.
SDV342760Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University. 1949. CUC/CF. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. Photograph (Paper). 19-20.
SDV342762Monograph: Davidson, J.. 1843. The History of Newenham Abbey. Unknown.
SDV342763Record Office Collection: Davidson, J.. 1830. Collections for Axminster and District. Davidson Manuscripts. Manuscript.
SDV342764Record Office Collection: Davidson, J.. 1832. History of Axminster. Davidson Manuscripts. Manuscript.
SDV342765Worksheet: Sylvester, R. J.. 1977. Newenham Abbey, Axminster. Devon Committee for Rescue Archaeology Register. Worksheet.
SDV342766Article in Serial: Allan, J. P. + Silvester, R.J.. 1981. Newenham Abbey, Axminster. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 39. Paperback Volume. 159-171.
SDV342767Article in Serial: Youings, J.. 1965 - 1967. Monastic Wool Sales. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 30. Unknown. 71-2.
SDV342768Article in Serial: Everett, A. W.. 1938 - 1939. Newenham Abbey. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 20. Unknown. 97-100.
SDV342769Record Office Collection: Swete, J.. 1795. 564M/9/119,123 Illustrations by Swete. Devon Record Office Collection. Unknown.
SDV342770Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. 1953 - 1980. SY29NE4. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
SDV342771Report - Survey: Griffiths, D. M.. 1985. An Archaeological Survey of Newenham Abbey, Axminster, Devon. Devon Religious Houses Survey. A4 Stapled + Digital. 3-4.
SDV342772Un-published: Gibbons, P.. 1993. Newenham Abbey. Monument Protection Programme. Archaeological Item Dataset.. Digital. 134675.
SDV342773Schedule Document: Ministry of Works. 1955. Newenham Abbey. The Schedule of Monuments. Foolscap.
SDV342774Schedule Document: Department of National Heritage. 1995. Newenham Abbey. The Schedule of Monuments. A4 Stapled.
SDV342775Report - Assessment: Adkins, L. + Adkins, R.. 1992. Land South of Abbey Close, Axminster, Devon. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV342776Correspondence: Claydon, G.. 1996. Newenham Abbey. Letter + Photos. A4 Single Sheet + Digital.
SDV342777Correspondence: Claydon, G.. 1994. Newenham Abbey. Letter and Photocopies. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV342778Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University. 1970. CUC/BCB. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. Photograph (Paper). 67.
SDV342779Ground Photograph: Devon County Council. 1995. Newenham Abbey. Devon County Council Conservation Section Collection. Photograph (Paper) + Digital. 1A-14A.
SDV342780Ground Photograph: Devon County Council. 1984. Newenham Abbey. Devon County Council Conservation Section Collection. Photograph (Paper) + Digital. 19-25.
SDV342781Ground Photograph: Devon County Council. 1981. Newenham Abbey, Axminster. Devon County Council Conservation Section Collection. Photograph (Paper) + Digital. 11-12.
SDV342782Monograph: Gasquet, F. A.. 1893. The Great Pestilence. Unknown. 90.
SDV342785Article in Serial: Webster, L. E. + Cherry, J.. 1978. Medieval Britain in 1977. Medieval Archaeology. 22. Unknown. 156.
SDV342787Worksheet: Goodyear, R. I.. 1990. Place Name of Newenham. Devon County Sites and Monuments Register. Worksheet.
SDV342789Ground Photograph: Unknown. 1985. Newenham Abbey. Slide.
SDV342791Article in Serial: Rowe, J. B.. 1877. Cistercian Houses of Devon: Newenham. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 9. Unknown. 361-79.
SDV342792Article in Serial: Rowe, J. B.. 1897. Cistercian Houses in Devon: Part 6. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 9. Unknown. 371-6.
SDV342795Correspondence: Everett, A. W.. 1937. Newenham Abbey. Copies of Letters and Plan. A4 Stapled.
SDV342796List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1960. Axminster RD. Provisional List. Unknown. 1-2.
SDV342797Ground Photograph: Devon County Council. 1981. Newenham Abbey. Devon County Council Conservation Section Collection. Unknown.
SDV342798Worksheet: Timms, S. C.. 1980. Newenham Abbey, Axminster. Devon County Planning Department Conservation Section Site Record. Worksheet.
SDV342803Aerial Photograph: National Monuments Record. SY2897. National Monuments Record Aerial Photograph. Unknown.
SDV344777Report - non-specific: English Heritage. 2010. Heritage at Risk Register 2010: South West. English Heritage Report. Digital. 86.
SDV347681Un-published: Unknown. 1986 - 1987. Devon Religious Houses Survey. Devon Religious Houses Survey. Mixed Archive Material.
SDV351551Report - Assessment: Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J.. 1990. Historic Landscape Assessment of Higher Bruckland Possible Reservoir Site and Six Reservoir Service Areas in the Axe Valley. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 90.16. A4 Stapled + Digital. 7; Figure 12.
SDV351568Archive - Survey: Exeter Archaeology. 2003-2004. East Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Archaeological Survey. East Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Archaeological Survey. Digital + Mixed Archive Material. Site No. 1155.
SDV355280Report - non-specific: English Heritage. 2011. Heritage at Risk Register 2011: South West. english Heritage. Digital. 88.
SDV358623Worksheet: Goodyear, R. I.. 1990. Domesday Manor. Worksheet + Digital.
SDV358633Un-published: Claydon, G.. 1994. Some Theories Concerning the Possible Origins, at Present U:nknown, of Axminster Saxon Church, Newenham Abbey and the Battle of Brunenburgh. Digital.
SDV358640Correspondence: Everett, A. W.. 1937. Letter and Plan in Department of the Environment files. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV358643Worksheet: Unknown. 1977. Worksheet + Digital.
SDV358645Un-published: Timms, S. C.. 1980. Newnham Abbey, Axminster. Devon County Planning Department, Conservation Section Site Record Sheet. A4 Single Sheet + Digital.
SDV358647Worksheet: Timms, S. C.. 1980. Newenham Abbey. Worksheet + Digital.
SDV358650Plan - measured: Timms, S. C.. 1981. Annotated Plan Showing Scheduled Area, Outbuildings Demolished in 1981 and Remains of Medieval Barn. Plan + Digital.
SDV358655Plan - measured: Everett, A. W.. 1937. Newenham Abbey (Cistercian) Axminster. Plan + Digital.
SDV361751Article in Serial: Robinson, D. M. + Harrison, S.. 2006. Cistercian Cloisters in England and Wales. Part 1. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 159. Digital. 177-178.
SDV57424Monograph: Oliver, G.. 1846. Monasticon Diocesis Exoniensis. Monasticon Diocesis Exoniensis. Unknown. 357-370.
SDV7422Article in Serial: Rose-Troup, F.. 1936 - 1937. Lead from the Dissolved Religious Houses in Devon in 1549. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 19. Unknown. 122-6.
SDV99887Article in Serial: Weddell, P. J. + Reed, S. J. + Simpson, S. J.. 1993. Excavation of the Exeter-Dorchester Roman Road at the River Yarty and the Roman Fort Ditch and Settlement Site at Woodbury, Near Axminster.. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 51. Paperback Volume. 88.
SDV99927Report - Assessment: Weddell, P. J.. 1991. Archaeological Appraisal of Potential Development Areas in Axminster and its Environs. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 91.14. A4 Stapled + Digital. 4.
SDV99942Report - Assessment: Weddell, P. J. + Holbrook, N.. 1987. A35 Axminster By-pass Report on Trial Archaeological Excavations and Documentary Research 1987. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 87.06. A4 Stapled + Digital. 4.

Associated Monuments

MDV16838Parent of: CEMETERY in the Parish of Axminster (Monument)
MDV16835Parent of: Cloister, Newenham Abbey, Axminster (Monument)
MDV16836Parent of: Newnham Abbey Church, Axminster (Monument)
MDV16842Part of: Furzeleigh Farm, Axminster (Monument)
MDV18626Related to: Abbey Doorway at House next to Police Station, Axminster (Monument)
MDV18628Related to: Abbey Doorway at Terrace Lodge, Axminster (Monument)
MDV18630Related to: Abbey Windows and Doorway at Loretto Cottage, Axminster (Monument)
MDV71743Related to: Doorway of Archway Bookshop, Church Street, Axminster (Monument)
MDV11440Related to: GRANGE in the Parish of Axminster (Monument)
MDV16839Related to: Newenham Deerpark (Monument)
MDV59111Related to: Old Park Farm, Axminster (Monument)
MDV16833Related to: Tithe Barn, Axminster (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:Feb 27 2020 11:15AM