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HER Number:MDV12413
Name:Hartland Manor

Summary

The Domesday manor of Hertitone is identified as Hartland, or anciently Harton. It is mentioned in King Alfred's will, circa AD881. Soon after the death of William I it was granted to the Dinham family in whose hands it remained until 1501.

Location

Grid Reference:SS 257 244
Map Sheet:SS22SE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishHartland
DistrictTorridge
Ecclesiastical ParishHARTLAND

Protected Status: none recorded

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SS22SE/36

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • MANOR (VIII to Post Medieval - 701 AD to 1750 AD (Between))

Full description

Worth, R. N., 1893, The Identifications of the Domesday Manors of Devon, 326 (Article in Serial). SDV21436.

Worth identifies the Domesday manor of Hertitone as Hartland, or anciently Harton.


Reichel, O. J., 1894, The Hundred of Hartland and the Geld Roll, 416 (Article in Serial). SDV5887.

At the time of the Geldroll, 1084, Hartland, or Hertiton, was held by the king.


Chope, R. P., 1918, The Last of the Dynhams, 433-434 (Article in Serial). SDV21435.

Harton Manor. If this is the site of Hartland Manor, the author notes that by 1241 it had most probably become the chief Dynham manor.


Carter, G. E. L., 1933, Borough English and Burgage Tenure, 389-391 (Article in Serial). SDV21439.

Author notes evidence of transition from manorial to more free agricultural organisation in the Manor of Hartland, which he terms a priveleged estate, from the point of view of its agricultural community. He also notes its acquisition of Borough status.


Finberg, H. P. R., 1953, Untitled Source, 9 (Monograph). SDV52742.

King Alfred's will of 881 leaves estate of Harton to his son Edward.


Hoskins, W. G., 1954, A New Survey of England: Devon, 405 (Monograph). SDV17562.

Hartland was a royal estate from the time of King Alfred to the time of Canute. Soon after the death of William I it was granted to one of the Dynham family, in whose family it remained until 1501.


Pearce, S. M., 1985, The Early Church in the Landscape: The Evidence from North Devon (part), 265 (Article in Serial). SDV336495.

Estate in 1066 in the hands of Gyditha, wife of Earl Godwin.


Hobbs, S., 2006, The Saxon Boundaries of Hartland Hundred (Article in Serial). SDV340918.

Hartland Hundred history


Hobbs, S., 2006, The Saxon Boundaries of Hartland Hundred, 5-7 (Article in Serial). SDV340918.

After 1066 Hartland was a Royal manor, passing subsequently to the Dinham family. The date of transfer to the Dinhams is unknown, but between 1160 and 1189 they gave land at Stoke and within the manor of Hartland for the foundation of an abbey. This shows that the Dinhams had control of the 'Hartland landmass', and that their control extended over lands at Stoke St. Nectan.
The Dinham estate papers show that the manor was sub-divided into three units: Butterbury, Castel and Hind-Harton, plus the separate Borough of Harton (established circa 1290).
The late-15th century/early-16th century system of collection of money known as 'the Gathers' may be identifiable with the Dinham administrative areas. If so, the division can be projected back into the 12th century, and it could be proposed that Clovelly and possibly Bucks Mills formed an East Gather, and Woolfardisworthy a South Gather, thus encompassing the 'compact' Hundred of Hartland. Welcombe may have been integral to the West Gather as it was not separated from the ecclesiastical parish until leter. If that were accepted then the identification of these as independent collective administrative areas could well indicate that they originated as early Saxon charter areas.


Collings, A. G. + Manning, P. T. + Valentin, J., 2007, The North Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Phase 1. Archaeological Survey. Summary Report, No. 685 (Report - Assessment). SDV339712.

Hartland Manor. The Domesday Manor of Hertitone has been identified as Hartland, anciently Harton. Hartland was a royal estate from the time of King Alfred to the time of Canute. It apparently acquired borough status.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV17562Monograph: Hoskins, W. G.. 1954. A New Survey of England: Devon. A New Survey of England: Devon. A5 Hardback. 405.
SDV21435Article in Serial: Chope, R. P.. 1918. The Last of the Dynhams. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 50. Unknown. 433-434.
SDV21436Article in Serial: Worth, R. N.. 1893. The Identifications of the Domesday Manors of Devon. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 25. Unknown. 326.
SDV21439Article in Serial: Carter, G. E. L.. 1933. Borough English and Burgage Tenure. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 65. A5 Hardback. 389-391.
SDV336495Article in Serial: Pearce, S. M.. 1985. The Early Church in the Landscape: The Evidence from North Devon (part). Archaeological Journal. 142. A4 Stapled + Digital. 265.
SDV339712Report - Assessment: Collings, A. G. + Manning, P. T. + Valentin, J.. 2007. The North Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Phase 1. Archaeological Survey. Summary Report. Exeter Archaeology Report. 06.22 (rev.1). A4 Stapled + Digital. No. 685.
SDV340918Article in Serial: Hobbs, S.. 2006. The Saxon Boundaries of Hartland Hundred. North Devon Archaeological Society Newsletter. 12. A5 Paperback + Digital. 5-7.
SDV52742Monograph: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1953. The Early Charters of Devon and Cornwall. Unknown. 9.
SDV5887Article in Serial: Reichel, O. J.. 1894. The Hundred of Hartland and the Geld Roll. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 36. Unknown. 416.

Associated Monuments

MDV74546Related to: Hardisworthy, Hartland (Monument)
MDV21740Related to: Hartland Borough (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:Nov 9 2017 2:04PM