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HER Number:MDV1534
Name:St. Nectan's Church, Hartland

Summary

One of the finest churches in North Devon, its interior little altered by restoration and retaining much of its early fabric and features. The Lady Chapel, situated next to the chancel, dates to the 14th century. Most of its roof bosses are original and each panel is of different design. The tower is 128 feet high, the second highest in Devon. The church may have originated as a monastery in the 6th century.

Location

Grid Reference:SS 235 247
Map Sheet:SS22SW
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishHartland
DistrictTorridge
Ecclesiastical ParishHARTLAND

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Church of England HER: 5258
  • National Monuments Record: SS22SW13
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SS22SW/3
  • Old Listed Building Ref (I): 91258

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • PARISH CHURCH (Post Roman to XXI - 410 AD to 2009 AD (Between))

Full description

National Monuments Record, SS22SW13 (National Monuments Record Database). SDV15440.


Unatributed Sites and Monuments Register Entry (Unattributed Sites and Monuments Register Entry). SDV263.

Parish church. Parish accounts record payment for an hourglass in 1602- 1603, and in 1624-1625, and again in 1631-1632.


Unknown, Untitled Source, 572-574 (Unknown). SDV20403.


Kerslake, T., 1877, Traces of the Ancient Kingdom of Dumnonia outside Cornwall, 415 (Article in Serial). SDV5885.

Parish church. Cf. Register parish file (Express & Echo cutting 20th November 1976). St. Nectan. Great tower. Built by the monks of Hartland Abbey, founded circa 1050 by Gyrta, wife of Earl Godwin. Magnificent rood screen which extends across the nave and aisles (14.78 metres). The rare fan tracery is in excellent condition. Norman font with interlaced arches. Bench ends installed 1530. The wagon roof, particularly that of the north chancel aisle, is partly plastered and coloured with attractive bosses. A priest's chamber approached by stone steps contains the village stocks. One of the chapels has an ancient altar with a splendidly carved and gilded canopy. Many interesting memorial slabs. Modern craftsmen have added a peace memorial, a finely carved altar and a reredos with figures of ten saints. Sundial on exterior wall. Plate. The survival of ancient dedication is noted, a dedication said to be shrinal, marking the burial place of the saint.


Brushfield, T. N., 1892, The Church of All Saints, East Budleigh. Part 2, 245 (Article in Serial). SDV15399.


Ordnance Survey, 1906, 17SW (Cartographic). SDV5523.

'Abbey Church of St. Nectan' marked 1906 6 inch Ordnance Survey map.


Chanter, J. F., 1910, Christianity in Devon before AD 909, 491 (Article in Serial). SDV870.


Thompson, A. H., 1913, Church Architecture in Devon, 472 (Article in Serial). SDV15387.


Cresswell, B. F., 1916 - 1917, Sittings in Churches, 118 (Article in Serial). SDV15403.

Carved bench ends of early 16th century noted.


Cresswell, B. F., 1918-1919, Sepulchral Slabs with Crosses in Devon Churches, 7 (Article in Serial). SDV7613.

In the chancel is a slab incised with a cross. It bears an illegible inscription and the date 1465. Erroneously called the 'Bishop's Tomb'.


Clarke, K. M., 1920, The Baptismal Fonts of Devon, Part 7, 333-334 (Article in Serial). SDV343781.

The church has a beautifully ornamented table font of freestone.


A. L. R., 1920 - 1921, Armour, Helmets etc., in Devon and Cornwall, 93 (Article in Serial). SDV15405.

Wooden helmet with Abbott crest is in room over north porch.


Chope, R. P., 1920 - 1921, Sittings in Hartland Church, 1613, 26-28 (Article in Serial). SDV15404.

Author describes early 17th century document listing sittings assigned to the parishoners by episcopal commissioners.


Chope, R. P., 1922 - 1923, Church Armour at Hartland, 329-336 (Article in Serial). SDV15432.


Chope, R. P., 1922 - 1923, Hour-Glasses in Churches: Hartland, 141 (Article in Serial). SDV20404.

17th century records show frequent renewal of the hour-glass. No longer any trace of one in 1922.


Chope, R. P., 1922 - 1923, St. Nectan, 312-313 (Article in Serial). SDV15409.

St. Nectan is depicted as a bishop in a statue on the tower and in the west panel of the churchyard cross. The mitred head of the statue is not of a piece with the body and is of much later date. The author also refers to the Elizabethan and Jacobean church armour mentioned in contemporary church accounts. Other details: Plate.


Chope, R. P., 1926 - 1927, Barrel Organ in Hartland Church, 172 (Article in Serial). SDV15407.

A barrel organ, said to have been used in the church in the 19th century, is preserved in 'The Pope's Chamber' over the north porch. Other details: Plate.


Chope, R. P., 1928 - 1929, The Docton Monuments in Hartland Church, 49-52 (Article in Serial). SDV15406.

Various monuments, in danger of disappearing, described. Other details: Plates.


Masson Phillips, E. N., 1938, The Ancient Stone Crosses of Devon: Part II, 310 (Article in Serial). SDV6308.

Square cross base survives in the church.


Reichel, O. J., 1939, The Church and the Hundreds in Devon, 340-341 (Article in Serial). SDV15424.


Masson Phillips, E. N., 1943, Supplementary Notes on the Ancient Stone Crosses of Devon. (Third Paper), 263 (Article in Serial). SDV320746.

A reference to the churchyard cross (the base of which now resets in the church) occurs in 1559-1560 when two shillings were paid to Philippe May 'for takinge out of the base of the crosse'.


Blackwell, A. E., 1950, 15th Report of the North Devon Branch, 174 (Article in Serial). SDV15402.

Stoke church has the highest tower of any church in Devon.


Pevsner, N., 1952, The Buildings of England: North Devon, 94-95 (Monograph). SDV336196.


Crowley, J. M., 1954, Notes on the Ruined Chapel of St. Helen at Croyde, in the Parish of Georgeham, 170 (Article in Serial). SDV343782.


Department of Environment, 1955, Bideford RD, 10 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV4813.

Church of St. Nectan. Largely 14th/15th century church built of local stone with magnificent tall tower of 4 stages with embattlements and pinnacles. Perpendicular windows. Well proportioned interior with nave arcade. Five bays; painted barrel-vaulted roof; 17th century benches. Superb richly carved 15th century screen. Escaped 19th century restoration. Norman font.


Blackwell, A. E., 1959 - 1961, Mortehoe Notes, 318 (Article in Serial). SDV86748.

Tower formerly limewashed to act as a beacon to shipping.


Lewis, F. K., 1969, The Guide to Hartland's Church, 1-4 (Leaflet). SDV320754.

The original church was built about 1055. Nothing remains of this church except possibly the bases of the pillars and the font. The present church was built about 1360. Some alterations of a later date. Simple plan, chancel with north and south aisles, north and south porches and a western tower. Waggon type roofs throughout, portion adjoining the chancel is panelled and decorated with large painted stars. A large oak beam from HMS Revenge was used to strengthen the roof. Carved oak reredos surrounds the altar and was erected in 1931 as a war memorial. The altar tomb is of 14th century date, brought from the abbey in 1848, now situated in the chancel since 1931 when a new altar was built. The western side of the north aisle was destroyed by fire although it has since been restored. About 60 mural monuments and epitaphs within the church. All church windows were replaced except the one in the Pope's chamber in 1848. Two porches north and south. Both have the usual stone benches with inner doorways of old oak cased with deal.
The church seats. Hugh Prust of Thorny at his own expense paid for all the seats in St. Mary guild in the north chancel aisle about 1540. These seats were framed with carved ends with the initials H. P. The seats are still in use in the south chancel aisle, where they were transferred in the mid 17th century.
The Lady Chapel, known also as St. Mary's guild. Fine roof. Built in the 14th century, most of the bosses are original and each panel is of different design. True restoration of the old work, with original lady chapel window. This window has three roundels of which the central one is of genuine 14th century glass - probably Flemish - containing the figure of the Virgin. The others are of similar style.
The organ. In 1637 the famous organ builder, John Loosemore was paid four pounds sterling for the erection of an organ. In 1639, John Gibbons was employed to build seats near the organ. In 1650 the organ was taken down again and additional seats erected in its place. Another organ was placed on the screen in 1846 but soon afterwards removed to the chamber over the vestry, later being transferred to the floor of the north chancel aisle. The present organ placed in the north transept was obtained from Ventnor parish church and rebuilt in 1958.
The tower stands 128 feet and is the second highest in Devon. Walls are approx 5 feet 6 inches thick. The tower contains six bells recast from the five original bells in 1826. One of the bells was recast in 1886. This tower serves as a landmark to sailors


Delderfield, E., 1976, March of Time Has Left it Behind (Article in Serial). SDV15418.


Hartland Quay Museum, 1981, Guide to the Coast and Shipwrecks. North from Hartland Quay (Leaflet). SDV341566.


Griffith, F. M., 1984, DAP/BL, 12 (Aerial Photograph). SDV15434.


Pearce, S. M., 1985, The Early Church in the Landscape: The Evidence from North Devon (part), 266 (Article in Serial). SDV336495.

Pearce argues that St. Nectan's was in origin a British monastery, founded in the 6th century.


Department of Environment, 1989, Hartland, 102 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV114.

Parish church. A collegiate church was founded here by Gytha in circa 1050 and dedicated to St. Nectan, the main fabric dates from the 14th and 15th century. Restored circa 1850 and 1910-11. Coursed rubble walls with stone coping to gables. Gable ended slate roofs.
Plan: nave, chancel, north and south aisles, transept chapels and porches, west tower. The main style of the church is perpendicular but the window tracery has largely been replaced and the nave, chancel and tower at least are likely to be 14th century. Aisles and north and south porches likely to have been built between the second half of the 14th century and the later 15th century. A restoration of circa 1850 replaced the tracery of the windows when the parclose screens were also put in. In 1910-11 Mr. Herbert Read made a careful restoration of all the decayed and missing portions of the roof in St. Mary's chapel (north), faithfully copying designs and colours of the original work and retaining all that was sound.
Exterior: imposing 4 stage tower 128 feet high with set back buttresses with gargoyles at the top, embattled parapet and large corner pinnacles. 2-light transomed belfry openings of decorated style. On the east face of the tower in a canopied niche is the figure of St. Nectan probably medieval but with the head replaced by that of a bishop. Original moulded west doorway with almost semi-circular head terminating in carved angels, each holding a shield and clothed as a monk. Restored window above with probably 20th century tracery in decorated style of doulting stone. Both north and south aisles are embattled and windows restored in circa 1850 with perpendicular tracery, apart from ease window of south aisle, which is decorated style. Chancel has 18th century lead rainwater head on south wall. Large perpendicular gabled 2 storey north porch has simple outer doorway with pointed arch and double hollow moulded 4-centred inner arch. In east wall on 1st floor original 2-light window survives with square head and jambs grooved for shutters, the central moulded mullion has been re-used. South porch carries date stone of 1786 commemorating the rebuilding of its front wall with a simple flattened arch and a sundial above dated 1804. The large south doorway is 14th century with a 2-centre head and double row of mouldings in between which are small carved fleurons. Both porches retain their medieval wagon roofs and have stone benches. Their doors are in fact early constructed of oak but encased with deal.
Interior: walls are plastered, much of it ancient with signs of old colour but the surface emulsion painted. 14th century trefoiled piscina in chancel. Medieval wagon roofs throughout restored in varying degrees. That to nave has ornamental bosses, moulded ribs, carved wall-plate and painted decoration; the east half is ceiled with decorated panels renewed in 20th century. North and south aisle roofs have moulded ribs, carved wall-plates and bosses - the western portion of the north aisle roof was destroyed by fire and reconstructed with new bosses symbolising the Christian's progress through life. The roof of the north (Lady) chapel is particularly ornate with most of the bosses original and the decoration in each panel is of a different design. Parclose screens are 19th century. High quality benches with carved ends in south chapel which according to documentary evidence were originally installed in the Lady chapel 1540. Other pews largely 17th century with some 19th century restoration. Restored medieval pulpit on renewed stone base. All the glass is 19th or early 20th century, apart from one in the Lady chapel which has 3 roundels of which the central one is 14th century depicting the Virgin Mary.
This is one of the finest churches in North Devon, its interior little altered by restoration and retaining much of its early fabric and features. Other details: LBS No. 91258.


Griffith, F. M., 1990, DAP/TA, 1-2 (Aerial Photograph). SDV15445.


Collings, A. G. + Manning, P. T. + Valentin, J., 2007, The North Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Phase 1. Archaeological Survey. Summary Report, No. 133, 538, 633, 634, 635, 664 (Report - Assessment). SDV339712.


Hobbs, S., 2007, Various Sites around Hartland (Correspondence). SDV351130.

Much of the church as presented today is moulded by Richard Pearse Chope and Rev. Preb. Ivon Gregory. Between these two prominent persons they exerted influence in a number of directions the principal one being the replacement of the window glass.
The restoration of the ceiling of the Lady Chapel was paid for by Pearse Chope in the early 1900s along with remedial work on the top of the rood screen (Hartland Church Accounts). It is possible that this work was in association with alterations to the chancel at this period. A photograph in The John Stabb ‘Some Old Devon Churches’ books shows that c.1920 there existed a floor which ran at the height of the now parclose screen thus dividing the Mary guild into two floors and reputedly extended into what is now the vestry room.
Regarding the Prust seats. In essence documentation exists which indicates that Hugh Prust had the seats made in Bideford c.1540 and that they were installed in St Mary’s Guild (North chancel aisle). If this is the case they must have been removed pre 1612 when the seating plan was approved as the plan and seating are not comparable.


Walls, S., 2011, Archaeological Watching Brief During the Excavations for a Water Pipe, Electricity Cable and Drainage for St Nectan's Church, Stoke, Hartland (Report - Watching Brief). SDV348215.

An archaeological watching brief was undertaken during the excavation of four service trenches. Three of the trenches were located within the churchyard and the fourth within the church tower and extending under the west door to join the churchyard trenches. Trench 4 showed that immediately below the concrete surface outside the church tower were substantial wall footings. The gap between these and the tower itself suggests that they were partially truncated during the insertion/rebuilding of the tower entrance. A fragment of a slate floor tablet bearing the data 1631 found beneath the stone cill lends support to this theory. Alternatively they may be indicative of an earlier tower. Other finds from Trench 4 included a silver Edward I penny (1279-1307) recovered from a deposit (401) inside the church tower.


Hobbs, S., 2011, Heritage Gateway Feedback About Monument Id. 34015 (Correspondence). SDV346310.

Mr. Hobbs research on the seating within St. Nectans includes a drawn survey and explanation of the distribution of seating from an assignment made in circa 1613.


Arnold, A. + Howard, R., 2013, Church of St. Nectan, Stoke, Hartland, Devon. Tree-Ring Analysis of Timbers (Report - Scientific). SDV355874.

Tree ring analysis was undertaken from samples or in situ measurements from roof timbers, boards and pews in order to elucidate the historical development of the church. It was also hoped that the analysis would establish the extent of pre AD1613 pews and whether the type of pew was dependent on when it was made. A total of 36 timbers were sampled from the roof timbers of the vestry, porch and priests chamber and fifty one pew bench ends were sampled. In addition ring sequences were measured directly on the ends of 11 nave ceiling boards and five pulpit boards stored in the museum.
Of the three roofs analysed the earliest timbers identified are those utilised in the construction of the Priest’s Chamber roof which were felled AD1438-60 suggesting construction of this part of the church in the mid 15th century. The roof of the south porch was constructed with timber felled 1487-1512, making this roof of late 15th/early 16th century date, somewhat later than previously thought. The felling date of 1499-1524 for the vestry roof timbers also indicate a later construction date than previously believed, at the end of the 15th/beginning of the 16th century. Since the felling dates of these latter two roofs overlap it is possible that they are contemporary or at least part of the same building project.
The timber used for the nave ceiling boards was felled after 1497 and may have been part of the same building campaign as that for the vestry and porch roofs in the late 15th or early 16th century. The pulpit boards were felled post 1591 which provides some support for the documentary reference to the purchase of the pulpit in 1609. It suggests that not much more than the sapwood was trimmed from the boards for the construction of the pulpit.
The majority (32) of the dated bench ends from all four dated pew types appear most likely to have been present when the 1613 seating plan was created. Eleven type A1 pew bench ends were constructed of timber felled AD1584-1605. The majority of the type A2s were felled AD1590-1615. The dated type Bs were felled AD1583-1613. Several of the dated type Fs were felled AD1588-1613 but others are later including one felled AD1712-37. The overlapping of the felling date ranges make it possible that the various pew types are in fact contemporary or at least part of a single campaign of construction that may have taken a number of years. The remaining 14 dated bend ends all clearly post date 1613 and as all four pew types are represented could indicate repairs, replacements and additions. It can be seen, therefore, that the style of pew is not necessarily related to when it was made. The later pew bench ends are not only found in places without pews in 1613 but also where it is known there were pews at that time. It appears that a degree of replacement of reorganisation has taken place at the front of the nave subsequent to the 1613 seating plan.
Despite the overlapping chronologies there are only low levels of similarity between them which is insufficient to produce a master chronology. The disparity suggests the use of varied woodland sources. The matching of the various site chronologies with reference chronologies suggests a relatively local origin although it is possible that some of the bench ends and the pulpit boards may have come from further afield. However, the location of St. Nectans near the coast on a promontory does raise the possibility of varied growth conditions in the local area.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV114List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1989. Hartland. Historic Houses Register. A4 Spiral Bound. 102.
SDV15387Article in Serial: Thompson, A. H.. 1913. Church Architecture in Devon. Archaeological Journal. 70. Unknown. 472.
SDV15399Article in Serial: Brushfield, T. N.. 1892. The Church of All Saints, East Budleigh. Part 2. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 24. Unknown. 245.
SDV15402Article in Serial: Blackwell, A. E.. 1950. 15th Report of the North Devon Branch. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 82. Hardback Volume. 174.
SDV15403Article in Serial: Cresswell, B. F.. 1916 - 1917. Sittings in Churches. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 9: Part 1. Unknown. 118.
SDV15404Article in Serial: Chope, R. P.. 1920 - 1921. Sittings in Hartland Church, 1613. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 11.1. Unknown. 26-28.
SDV15405Article in Serial: A. L. R.. 1920 - 1921. Armour, Helmets etc., in Devon and Cornwall. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 11.1. Unknown. 93.
SDV15406Article in Serial: Chope, R. P.. 1928 - 1929. The Docton Monuments in Hartland Church. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 15. Unknown. 49-52.
SDV15407Article in Serial: Chope, R. P.. 1926 - 1927. Barrel Organ in Hartland Church. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 14. Unknown. 172.
SDV15409Article in Serial: Chope, R. P.. 1922 - 1923. St. Nectan. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 12. Unknown. 312-313.
SDV15418Article in Serial: Delderfield, E.. 1976. March of Time Has Left it Behind. Express & Echo. Newspaper/Magazine Cutting + Digital.
SDV15424Article in Serial: Reichel, O. J.. 1939. The Church and the Hundreds in Devon. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 71. A5 Paperback. 340-341.
SDV15432Article in Serial: Chope, R. P.. 1922 - 1923. Church Armour at Hartland. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 12. Unknown. 329-336.
SDV15434Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1984. DAP/BL. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 12.
SDV15440National Monuments Record Database: National Monuments Record. SS22SW13. National Monuments Record Index. Unknown.
SDV15445Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1990. DAP/TA. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 1-2.
SDV20403Unknown: Unknown. 5th Report of the Historical Manuscripts Commission. Unknown. 572-574.
SDV20404Article in Serial: Chope, R. P.. 1922 - 1923. Hour-Glasses in Churches: Hartland. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 12. Unknown. 141.
SDV263Unattributed Sites and Monuments Register Entry: Unatributed Sites and Monuments Register Entry.
SDV320746Article in Serial: Masson Phillips, E. N.. 1943. Supplementary Notes on the Ancient Stone Crosses of Devon. (Third Paper). Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 75. A5 Hardback. 263.
SDV320754Leaflet: Lewis, F. K.. 1969. The Guide to Hartland's Church. A5 Unbound. 1-4.
SDV336196Monograph: Pevsner, N.. 1952. The Buildings of England: North Devon. The Buildings of England: North Devon. Paperback Volume. 94-95.
SDV336495Article in Serial: Pearce, S. M.. 1985. The Early Church in the Landscape: The Evidence from North Devon (part). Archaeological Journal. 142. A4 Stapled + Digital. 266.
SDV339712Report - Assessment: Collings, A. G. + Manning, P. T. + Valentin, J.. 2007. The North Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Phase 1. Archaeological Survey. Summary Report. Exeter Archaeology Report. 06.22 (rev.1). A4 Stapled + Digital. No. 133, 538, 633, 634, 635, 664.
SDV341566Leaflet: Hartland Quay Museum. 1981. Guide to the Coast and Shipwrecks. North from Hartland Quay. Hartland Quay Museum Leaflet. Leaflet + Digital.
SDV343781Article in Serial: Clarke, K. M.. 1920. The Baptismal Fonts of Devon, Part 7. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 52. A5 Hardback. 333-334.
SDV343782Article in Serial: Crowley, J. M.. 1954. Notes on the Ruined Chapel of St. Helen at Croyde, in the Parish of Georgeham. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 86. A5 Hardback. 170.
SDV346310Correspondence: Hobbs, S.. 2011. Heritage Gateway Feedback About Monument Id. 34015. Email to B. Horner. A4 Single Sheet + Digital.
SDV348215Report - Watching Brief: Walls, S.. 2011. Archaeological Watching Brief During the Excavations for a Water Pipe, Electricity Cable and Drainage for St Nectan's Church, Stoke, Hartland. Southwest Archaeology HER Entry. HSN11. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV351130Correspondence: Hobbs, S.. 2007. Various Sites around Hartland. Letter to Historic Environment Record. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV355874Report - Scientific: Arnold, A. + Howard, R.. 2013. Church of St. Nectan, Stoke, Hartland, Devon. Tree-Ring Analysis of Timbers. English Heritage Research Department Report. 47-2013. A4 Grip Bound + Digital.
SDV4813List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1955. Bideford RD. Historic Houses Register. Unknown. 10.
SDV5523Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1906. 17SW. Second Edition Ordnance Survey 6 inch Map. Map (Paper).
SDV5885Article in Serial: Kerslake, T.. 1877. Traces of the Ancient Kingdom of Dumnonia outside Cornwall. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 33. Unknown. 415.
SDV6308Article in Serial: Masson Phillips, E. N.. 1938. The Ancient Stone Crosses of Devon: Part II. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 70. A5 Hardback. 310.
SDV7613Article in Serial: Cresswell, B. F.. 1918-1919. Sepulchral Slabs with Crosses in Devon Churches. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 10.1. Unknown. 7.
SDV86748Article in Serial: Blackwell, A. E.. 1959 - 1961. Mortehoe Notes. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 28. Unknown. 318.
SDV870Article in Serial: Chanter, J. F.. 1910. Christianity in Devon before AD 909. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 42. A5 Hardback. 491.

Associated Monuments

MDV71266Parent of: Beehive Quern in St. Nectan's Church, Hartland (Find Spot)
MDV71266Related to: Beehive Quern in St. Nectan's Church, Hartland (Find Spot)
MDV4411Parent of: Docton Memorial in St. Nectan's Church, Hartland (Monument)
MDV1536Parent of: Font in St. Nectan's Church, Hartland (Monument)
MDV53050Parent of: Memorials in St. Nectan's Church, Hartland (Monument)
MDV72672Parent of: Pot Quern in St Nectan's, Hartland (Find Spot)
MDV1535Parent of: Rood Screen in St. Nectan's Church, Hartland (Monument)
MDV106810Parent of: Stoke WWI Board and Reredos, St Nectan's (Monument)
MDV32102Parent of: Sundial at St. Nectan's Church, Hartland (Monument)
MDV32101Parent of: The Pope's Chamber, St. Nectan's Church, Hartland (Building)
MDV71266Parent of: Beehive Quern in St. Nectan's Church, Hartland (Find Spot)
MDV71266Related to: Beehive Quern in St. Nectan's Church, Hartland (Find Spot)
MDV81114Related to: Building west of St Nectan's Church (Monument)
MDV76Related to: Hartland Abbey (Monument)
MDV5347Related to: Hartland Churchyard Cross (Monument)
MDV113201Related to: Lychgate to St. Nectan's Churchyard, Hartland (Monument)
MDV82Related to: St. Michael's Chapel, Hartland (Building)
MDV53051Related to: St. Nectan's Churchyard Wall, Hartland (Monument)
MDV105667Related to: St. Nectan's Churchyard, Hartland (Monument)
MDV41899Related to: St. Nectan's Monastery, Hartland (Monument)
MDV51970Related to: Stranger's Hill, St. Nectan's Churchyard, Hartland (Monument)
MDV121633Related to: Two crosses in Hartland Churchyard (Monument)

Associated Finds

  • FDV5451 - COIN (XIII to XIV - 1279 AD to 1307 AD)
  • FDV2582 - HOURGLASS (XVII to Unknown - 1601 AD)
  • FDV5452 - GRAVE SLAB (XVII - 1631 AD to 1631 AD)
  • FDV4058 - ORGAN (XX to Unknown - 1901 AD)

Associated Events

  • EDV5616 - Archaeological Watching Brief at St Nectan's Church, Stoke
  • EDV6384 - Tree Ring Analysis of Timbers from St. Nectans Church, Stoke, Hartland

Date Last Edited:Mar 28 2018 11:24AM