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HER Number:MDV18727
Name:65-67a East Street, Ashburton

Summary

Former inn, now divided into four houses. Late medieval, the major right-hand portion (No 65 1/2 - No 67A), rebuilt early or mid 16th century. At one time was The Spread Eagle coaching inn. Coach entrance was through ground floor of No. 65.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 758 700
Map Sheet:SX77SE
Admin AreaDartmoor National Park
Civil ParishAshburton
DistrictTeignbridge
Ecclesiastical ParishASHBURTON

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX77SE/56
  • Old Listed Building Ref (II): 376046

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • HOUSE (Constructed, Late Medieval - 1401 AD to 1539 AD (Between))
  • COACHING INN (Altered, XVIII to XIX - 1750 AD? to 1880 AD (Between))

Full description

Department of Environment, 1973, Ashburton, 9 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV300597.

Nos. 65, 67 and 67A, East Street, Ashburton. 16th century or earlier. At one time was The Spread Eagle coaching inn. Coach entrance was through ground floor of No. 65. Small arched window is part of blocked two-light window. Part of label mould on east wall.
Interior contains linenfold panelling and moulded stud partition. May have other unexposed features.


Department of Environment, 1981, Correspondence with County Planning Office (Correspondence). SDV311096.

Eighteenth century appearance. Large house with irregular plan. No 65 has projecting bay, small scale two-storey wing and back wing. The two-storey wing has remains of two-bay medieval roof structure with three trusses. One truss has closed partition with wattle and daub infill. This is first medieval roof found in Ashburton during town scheme work. Other details: Department of Environment correspondence with County Planning Officer.


Royal Commission for the Historical Monuments of England, 1982, 65 East Street, Ashburton (Report - Assessment). SDV360095.

65 East Street, Ashburton
Small town house, perhaps 17th century, single cell or part of larger building. Two storeys, stone to the front and cob to the rear and retains fragments of its original roof.
The front wall to the street (south) is of slate rubble. That to the western gable is of cob, save for a rubble stack. The rear wall is of cob, with an outshot of brick, of late date, beyond it. The wall to the east (between numbers 65 and 67) is relatively thin, and of unknown construction on the ground floor and it is not clear whether it originally contained any openings.
On the first floor however, the wall is studded and contains no obvious openings, but leaving unanswered the question of whether the building comprised more than its present extent. The line of the rear wall continues behind the next property to the east, but it was not possible to tell whether these walls are of one build.
The roof has been altered and extensively repaired several times, in a rather unsympathetic manner. Three trusses in part remain of the original structure. The central and eastern trusses comprise principals, tie and collar, with clasped purlins closely framed by vertically-set angle braces. The wester truss is similar but lacks the tie, and the feet of the principals rest on the top of the wall with short ashlar pieces. The western truss is set against the inner face of the gable wall; the eastern truss lies above the eastern wall, is closed and filled with lath and plaster. There is no trace of a similar roof above any part of the building to the east. There was no evidence for the original position of the stair. The present stair is not original.
The subsequent history of the building seems closely involved with that of 67 and 69 to the east. The exterior has been treated uniformly with these, rough case and with a coved cornice, perhaps in the 18th century. Subsequent re-division has created a flying freehold for 65 in the first floor of 67.


Department of National Heritage, 1992, Ashburton, 60 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV337041.

Ashburton - East Street (north side) Nos.65, 65 1/2, 67, 67A (Formerly listed as East Street (north side) Nos.65, 67 and 67A) - GV II
Former inn, now divided into four houses. Late medieval, the major right-hand portion (No 65 1/2 - No 67A), rebuilt early or mid 16th century. Solid rendered walls (stone rubble and cob). Slated roof. Four rendered chimneys. Much altered, but No 65 1/2 appears to be a former projecting entrance porch with room adjoining, off-centre to left. Stair turret with canted sides at right-hand end. Cart entrance, with rooms over, at rear, opening off Roborough Lane.
Two storeys, five windows wide. No 65 has panelled double doors; 8-paned sash window to left. Upper storey has 3-light wood casement window with glazing bars. No 65 1/2 has late 20th century panelled door; large segmentel-headed 20th century window to left; 8-paned sash window in upper storey. Left side wall has two 16th century single-light windows: small square-headed one in ground storey, taller round-headed one above. Right side wall has similar square-headed window set between storeys. Nos 67-67A have 5-panelled 19th century door, flanked by 8-paned sash window; two matching windows in upper storey with a 6-paned sash window at a lower level in the centre. Attached to the right-hand end is a conduit head, which is separately listed. Above it is a small round-headed stair window; 3 round-headed lights (1 now blocked). Right side wall to Roborough Lane has small blocked round-arched window to left of upper storey. To right of it, a partly blocked square-headed window with remains of hood-mould. Cart entrance has segmental arch and double plank doors. Two 6-paned sash windows above. The whole front has a coved eaves-cornice, returning on to the side of the stair turret.
Interior: 1983 report says No 65 (the medieval part) has three original trusses with clasped purlins, comparable to those formerly at No 33 North Street (demolished 1970). West gable and centre trusses have sole-plates and ashlar-posts; purlins clasped between collar and principal held in position by an upright timber halved to both collar and principal. Timber darkened, but not certainly smoke-blackened. East truss closed with clean wattle-and-daub. Remainder of building re-roofed 17th or 18th century. A shouldered-head door frame survives in the roof space. Approximately late 16th or earlier 17th century painted plaster survives on one wall of first floor right-hand room. No 67 has in rear left-hand ground floor room a beam, parallel to street, with hollow and half-round mouldings; at left-hand end the moulding turns down to form the head of a stud. On 1st floor, to right, a stud-and-panel partition parallel with street; studs have ogee and half-round mouldings at front, plain chamfers at rear. Adjoining it (probably re-set) a shouldered-head door frame. Adjoining stairs, linenfold panelling, also probably re-set. No 67A has 18th century ground floor chimneypiece, eared architrave with keyblock and moulded cornice, cupboard with shaped shelves. 3-panelled ovolo-moulded door and another upstairs. Against right gable wall on ground floor a beam with ogee and quarter-round mouldings. The building is believed to have been The Spread Eagle Inn


Webb, P., 1995, The Pubs and Inns of Ashburton, 11 (Monograph). SDV347208.

Eagle Inn / Spread Eagle.
Known to be a notorious bawdy house and coaching inn from the 16th century. Later became the Eagle Dairy, which still existed as an empty shop in the 1970s. Now a private house. Functioned as a coaching inn prior to the Golden Lion and in the 18th century the main coaching route went up Roborough Lane.


Ordnance Survey, 2011, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV346129.

Buildings depicted on the modern mapping.


English Heritage, 2011, National Heritage List for England (National Heritage List for England). SDV347072.

Nos.65, 65 1/2, 67, 67A East Street, Ashburton. Former inn, now divided into four houses. Late medieval, the major right-hand portion (No 65 1/2 - No 67A), rebuilt early or mid 16th century. Solid rendered walls (stone rubble and cob). Slated roof. Four rendered chimneys. Much altered, but No 65 1/2 appears to be a former projecting entrance porch with room adjoining, off-centre to left. Stair turret with canted sides at right-hand end. Cart entrance, with rooms over, at rear, opening off Roborough Lane.
Two storeys, five windows wide. No 65 has panelled double doors; 8-paned sash window to left. Upper storey has 3-light wood casement window with glazing bars. No 65 1/2 has late 20th century panelled door; large segmentel-headed 20th century window to left; 8-paned sash window in upper storey. Left side wall has two 16th century single-light windows: small square-headed one in ground storey, taller round-headed one above. Right side wall has similar square-headed window set between storeys. Nos 67-67A have 5-panelled 19th century door, flanked by 8-paned sash window; two matching windows in upper storey with a 6-paned sash window at a lower level in the centre. Attached to the right-hand end is a conduit head, which is separately listed. Above it is a small round-headed stair window; 3 round-headed lights (1 now blocked). Right side wall to Roborough Lane has small blocked round-arched window to left of upper storey. To right of it, a partly blocked square-headed window with remains of hood-mould. Cart entrance has segmental arch and double plank doors. Two 6-paned sash windows above. The whole front has a coved eaves-cornice, returning on to the side of the stair turret.
Interior: 1983 report says No 65 (the medieval part) has three original trusses with clasped purlins, comparable to those formerly at No 33 North Street (demolished 1970). West gable and centre trusses have sole-plates and ashlar-posts; purlins clasped between collar and principal held in position by an upright timber halved to both collar and principal. Timber darkened, but not certainly smoke-blackened. East truss closed with clean wattle-and-daub. Remainder of building re-roofed 17th or 18th century. A shouldered-head door frame survives in the roof space. Approximately late 16th or earlier 17th century painted plaster survives on one wall of first floor right-hand room. No 67 has in rear left-hand ground floor room a beam, parallel to street, with hollow and half-round mouldings; at left-hand end the moulding turns down to form the head of a stud. On 1st floor, to right, a stud-and-panel partition parallel with street; studs have ogee and half-round mouldings at front, plain chamfers at rear. Adjoining it (probably re-set) a shouldered-head door frame. Adjoining stairs, linenfold panelling, also probably re-set. No 67A has 18th century ground floor chimneypiece, eared architrave with keyblock and moulded cornice, cupboard with shaped shelves. 3-panelled ovolo-moulded door and another upstairs. Against right gable wall on ground floor a beam with ogee and quarter-round mouldings. The building is believed to have been The Spread Eagle Inn (Listed 1951, amended 1992). Other details: LB UID: 376046.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV300597List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1973. Ashburton. Historic Houses Register. A4 Spiral Bound. 9.
SDV311096Correspondence: Department of Environment. 1981. Correspondence with County Planning Office. Unknown.
SDV337041List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of National Heritage. 1992. Ashburton. Historic Houses Register. A4 Spiral Bound. 60.
SDV346129Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2011. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey. Map (Digital). [Mapped feature: #82323 ]
SDV347072National Heritage List for England: English Heritage. 2011. National Heritage List for England. Website.
SDV347208Monograph: Webb, P.. 1995. The Pubs and Inns of Ashburton. The Pubs and Inns of Ashburton. Paperback Volume. 11.
SDV360095Report - Assessment: Royal Commission for the Historical Monuments of England. 1982. 65 East Street, Ashburton. Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments and Constructions. Digital.

Associated Monuments

MDV23301Related to: 63 East Street, Ashburton (Building)
MDV23302Related to: 69, 71 and 73 East Street, Ashburton (Building)
MDV17176Related to: Conduit on East Street, Ashburton (Monument)
MDV29220Related to: East Street, Ashburton (Monument)
MDV13600Related to: The Golden Lion, East Street Ashburton (Building)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:Feb 16 2018 3:30PM