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HER Number:MDV199
Name:Braunton Great Field

Summary

Braunton Great Field still survives as an example of open field agriculture. It is one of only three open field systems still operating in England.

Location

Grid Reference:SS 478 363
Map Sheet:SS43NE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishBraunton
DistrictNorth Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishBRAUNTON

Protected Status

  • SHINE: Earthworks, fields and hedgebanks associated with Braunton Great Field, open field system and WWII pillboxes

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SS43NE/18
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division: SS43NE15
  • SHINE Candidate (Yes)

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • FIELD SYSTEM (Early Medieval to XIX - 1066 AD to 1900 AD (Between))

Full description

Ordnance Survey, 73/163/031 (Aerial Photograph). SDV81711.


Royal Air Force, 753-5/81 (Aerial Photograph). SDV81696.


Unknown, Annotated Copies of Ordnance Survey Maps of Braunton Great Field (Cartographic). SDV341192.


Champion, T. C., Braunton and West Coast Local Plan: Objections to Policy BWC119 (Un-published). SDV341034.

Evidence in support of objections to the proposed amendment to Policy BWC119 (and the policy in its original form) which implies acceptance of the construction of a road across Braunton Great Field.


Braunton Conservation Project, Braunton Great Field (Pamphlet). SDV341193.


Phillips, Sanders + Stubbs, Broadlands, Braunton, North Devon (Correspondence). SDV341197.

Out of the 180 acres of land, 41 acres lie within the historic Braunton Great Field.


Unknown, ENG/8685 (Aerial Photograph). SDV81713.


Griffith, F. M., 18/12/1985, DAP/FU, 7-11 (Aerial Photograph). SDV74027.


Phear, J. B., 1889, Notes on Braunton Great Field, 201-204 (Article in Serial). SDV341031.

In 1889 there were said to be 491 strips covering 354 acres with about 56 owners. Other details: Map.


Ordnance Survey, 1904 - 1906, Second Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map (Cartographic). SDV325644.

The open field strip cultivation pattern is depicted.


Royal Air Force, 1946, RAF/106G/UK/1501, NMR RAF/106G/UK/1501 4007-4008 13-MAY-1946 (Aerial Photograph). SDV349927.

The open field strip cultivation pattern is visible.


Royal Air Force, 1946, RAF/106G/UK/1655, NMR RAF/106G/UK/1655 3364-3365 11-JUL-1946 (Aerial Photograph). SDV349996.

The open field strip cultivation pattern is visible.


Finberg, H. P. R., 1949, The Open Field in Devonshire, 180-187 (Article in Serial). SDV341453.

Original boundary is still clear, despite small-scale enclosures on south, east and west. To north it extended beyond Saunton Road to Fairlinch Lane and West Hill. Existing property boundaries in this area follow pattern of enclosed strips. Medieval origins are documented by reference to strips in calendar of close rolls for 1324. Other details: Number 92.


Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, 1951 - 1954, SS43NE15 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV341028.

1. Braunton Great field shown on Ordnance Survey 6 inch map of 1905.
2. Braunton Great field : suggest that this should be in Gothic type as a surviving example of medieval strip cultivation. The strips are divided by baulks in the directions so sketched and are 1 foot 6 inches in width. Holdings still scattered, strips should be mapped before they disappear by negligence. Visited March 1951. Hayditch, Longlands etc not seen.
3. At Braunton in north west Devon, an open field of some 350 acres divided into nearly 500 arable strips of mixed ownership. The line of demarcation of ownership is commonly indicated by a narrow unploughed baulk. There is documentary proof that arable strips were to be found at Braunton 600 years ago and more.
4. For an account of the open field system at Braunton see Hoskins and Finberg, Devonshire Studies pages 265-279.
5. Similar information to 2.
6. Open field system of probable medieval origin, consisting of field strips separated by low, narrow baulks, many of which have been ploughed out. Other details: Plan.


Hoskins, W. G., 1952, The Making of the Agrarian Landscape, 265-288 (Article in Monograph). SDV320933.

Other details: Plans (Reprinted as Finberg, H. P. R. 1969).


Slee, A. H., 1952, The Open Fields of Braunton, 142-9 (Article in Serial). SDV341030.

In 1840 there were some 500 strips on which tithe was paid, and over 60 cultivators, many of whom had single strips. Today there are 46 owners of about 200 strips which are worked by 21 cultivators. Other details: Plate 5 + 5a.


Hoskins, W. G., 1954, A New Survey of England: Devon, 347 (Monograph). SDV17562.

Other details: Addendum in Second Edition.


Stanes, R., 1964, Open Field Agriculture in South Devon, 73 (Article in Serial). SDV341037.

Furlong names Fairlinch, Greenway and Stoneacre were recorded in 1903 but are now gone.


Finberg, H. P. R., 1969, Westcountry Historical Studies, 129-151 (Monograph). SDV140512.


Millward, R. + Robinson, A., 1971, Untitled Source, 73-79 (Monograph). SDV81704.

Other details: Plans and Photos.


Sylvester, R. J., 1977, Braunton Great Field (Personal Comment). SDV341038.

Consideration being given to survey of great field by Devon Committee for Rescue Archaeology. No survey undertaken. Department of Environment decline to consider it for scheduling due to legal technicalities.


Beresford, M. W. + St. Joseph, J. K., 1979, Untitled Source, 43-44 (Monograph). SDV341452.

Braunton Great Field still survives as an example of open field agriculture. It is one of only three open field systems still operating in England. Other details: Photo.


Timms, S. C., 1981, Braunton Great Field (Personal Comment). SDV341039.

The medieval pattern of furlongs and strips can still be seen throughout the open field. Strips are divided by slight baulks or ditches. Baulks, some of which display the reverse-s curve, are circa 0.3 metres wide and not much more in height. The Ordnance Survey map of 1975 shows circa 140 strips surviving.Some baulks shown on this are not visible, but others not shown were noted. Great Field forms part of survey being undertaken by County Planning Department. Another open field system formerly existed on Braunton Down to the east of the village.


University College Swansea, 1981, Braunton Great Field (Plan - measured). SDV341033.

Surviving pattern of baulks surveyed at 1/2500. Other details: Survey Plan.


Pearce, S. M., 1981, The Archaeology of South West Britain, 83-84 (Monograph). SDV81689.

William I granted land to Bishop Warelwast of Exeter in a grant confirmed by a charter of Henry I. In 1225 this land formed part of the endowment of the estate of Braunton Dean, which remained an integrated holding until 1883 and in the 1843 Tithe Apportionment is shown to have included strips in Braunton Great Field. Other details: Photo and plan.


Timms, S. C., 1982, Braunton Great Field (Worksheet). SDV341040.

Visit by Department of Environment inspector, who is of the opinion that the Great Field can be considered for scheduling under new legislation. Existing boundary of open field and boundary of former medieval extent of open field sketched on Sites and Monuments Record overlay map.


Turpin, J. W., 1982, Braunton Great Field and Marshes, 4-5 (Report - non-specific). SDV341027.

The Braunton Great Field occupies about 142 hectares (350) acres to the south west of the village. It is classic example of an open field, and is accepted as one of very few in the country which retain their medieval character through the continuing practice of the cultivation of strips by different farmers.


Griffith, F. M., 1984, DAP/DW, 1, 2 (Aerial Photograph). SDV81712.


Harris, H., 1985, Great Field's Future Hangs in Balance (Article in Serial). SDV361490.

Braunton Great Field is one of very few examples of the ancient open field system of cultivation still existing in England. But the survival of this rare relic is currently in serious doubt, with the possibility that its historic significance may very soon be lost from sight.
The open field system dating from Anglo Saxon times, in which villages had their communal fields of one acre strips generally disappeared early in South West England.
In Saxon days Braunton was a royal manor, probably populated mainly by free landowners paying dues in kind to the King of Wessex. Village farms, besides having scattered holdings in the open field strips also had entitlement to grazing rights on Braunton Marsh and Down.
Documents from early 14th century identify land parcels by names corresponding to those of current furlongs in the Great Field.
A survey of 1788 shows still many individual strips with few block areas, although with some exchange, of plots within manors. It is probably largely because of this ownership among manors and private individuals and the complications of 60 or 70 farms intermingled in village and open field that the system continued intact.

See full article for more detail.


Phillips, Sanders + Stubbs, 1985, Sales Details for Score Farm, Braunton (Correspondence). SDV341195.

Land at Score Farm: Lots 8-19 are situated within the Braunton Great Field. Other details: Plan.


Pearce, S. M., 1985, The Early Church in the Landscape: The Evidence from North Devon (part), 268-269 (Article in Serial). SDV336495.


Timms, S. C., 1988, A Note on English Heritage and the Braunton Great Field (Correspondence). SDV341198.

Notes concerning English Heritage's refusal to schedule Braunton Great Field.


Griffith, F. M., 1988, Devon's Past. An Aerial View, 96 (Monograph). SDV64198.

Comparison of aerial photographs with the Ordnance Survey Plan will show the continuity of the land divisions here, even though they are marked only by low grassed baulks or 'landsherds' between the strips and sometimes by large beach pebbles at the ends of the strips. Although the overall area of the field system has been much reduced, and consolidation of holdings has taken place with the reduction in the total number of farmers, sufficient single strips are still visible to give a most striking impression of the former regime. Today the Great Field is one of the few surviving examples of open-field cultivation in the whole of Britain, and as such is of national importance.


Brayshay, M. + Kelly, A., 1988, Forrabury Common, Near Boscastle, Cornwall: the Ecology of an Open Field, 277-297 (Article in Serial). SDV341194.


Stanes, R., 1991, Braunton Great Field, 7-9 (Article in Serial). SDV341451.


Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J., 1992, Preliminary Archaeological Assessment, Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements, 4 (Report - Assessment). SDV18873.


Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J., 1993, Archaeological Assessment of NRA Braunton Tidal Defence Scheme, 2 (Report - Assessment). SDV81690.

No evidence that the Great Field extended as far east as the river. Original boundary most likely ran along the line of the existing field boundary which runs parallel to the footpath immediately west of Valator Bridge, then north along field lane or at least along the edge of the floodplain.


Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J., 1993, Archaeological Assessment of SWW Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements, 3, 6 (Report - Assessment). SDV4711.


Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J., 1993, Archaeological Assessment of SWW Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements, Part 1: Southern Routes, 3 (Report - Assessment). SDV4712.


Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J., 1993, Archaeological Assessment of SWW Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements, Part 2: Northern Route N1A, 2 (Report - Assessment). SDV81720.


Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit, 1994, Braunton Great Field Management Study (Report - non-specific). SDV341059.

The Great Field may have been a gradual reclamation of saltings and marsh. It may be significant that the manor of Braunton Dean, created circa 855, held no land in the Great Field, perhaps because it did not exist at that time. Documents suggest that by 1202 the Great Field was divided into strips and furlongs. The Great Hedge forms the boundary of the field and is probably the same age. The field is divided into 21 major named furlongs, each of which conform from 10 to 56 strips. Some of the furlong names date back to at least 1324. Land shards or turf banks separate the strips or lands, and some of the present tracks mark medieval headlands. A number of bound stones once existed, of which many have been ploughed out, but 13 were noted in 1994. The strips around Fairlinch and Cockacre were enclosed by 1842 as had a number of areas on the edges of the field. The recorded number of surviving strips has fallen from 448, farmed by 62 farmers in 1842, to 86 strips farmed by 11 farmers in 1994.
Multiple ownership may help to explain the survival of the Great Field into the last century, more or less untouched. There may be other reasons. Before 1813 there were no sea banks along the Taw and the Caen river to protect the Great Field from flooding. The only protection was the Great Hedge around the Great Field which lies exactly at the high water mark of Spring Tides. The Great Hedge was probably built initially and maintained by Braunton villagers to protect their valuable arable land. Maintenance of the hedge probably required a large labour force, provided when needed by the tenants of the Great Field. Enclosure and amalgamation of holdings and a reduction in the labour force might have put the Great Field at risk.
Another factor that may have saved the Great Field was its famed fertility. From at least 1640 it had a great reputation for growing continuous crops of barley without a break. It is not clear how the Field’s famed fertility was maintained, but to own and retain land of such reliable fertility was obviously attractive to farmers and this may have contributed to the Field’s survival.
One last possible survival factor is a curiosity. In Braunton, until the last century, land was inherited by the custom of ‘Cradle Land’ or ‘Borough English’. By this, land went to the youngest son - in the cradle - not, as was normal in most of England, to the eldest. It is thought that this meant in practice that the land was divided and more than one son would inherit and farm the land and that under this system men were kept on the land, whereas with one son inheriting - primogeniture - and no division of the land, men were driven off it. It seems possible that the division of the Great Field into strips of less than an acre and its survival, may have had something to do with old Saxon custom.


Horner, B., 1994, DAP/WO, 20-24 (Aerial Photograph). SDV321171.


Horner, B., 1995, DAP/YV, 27 (Aerial Photograph). SDV7961.


Unknown, 1995, Untitled Source (Unattributed Sites and Monuments Register Entry). SDV341454.

Ordnance Survey map of 1975 shows circa 140 strips surviving.


Exeter Archaeology, 1997, Velator Industrial Link: Environment Assessment. Volume I: Environmental Statement (Report - Assessment). SDV341036.

Discusses the potential adverse effects on cultural heritage resulting from the proposed Velator Industrial Link. Summarises the information contained in Section 12.0, Volume II, and should be read in conjunction with it. Braunton Great Field corresponds almost exactly with one of the Pleistocene river terraces, at least on its southern side, but overall the current boundary is certainly much reduced from former times. It is not certain how far eastward it originally extended, although by the mid 19th century its boundary was set at Field Lane, as today. Other details: Section 8.


Exeter Archaeology, 1997, Velator Industrial Link: Environmental Assessment. Volume II: Technical Annexes (Report - Assessment). SDV338471.

Report to assess the likely archaeological impact of the proposed Velator Industrial Link, Braunton. Field Lane represents the boundary of Braunton Great Field, and it is recommended that the lane and its adjoining hedgebanks are preserved. Other details: Section 12.


Wessex Archaeology, 2007, RMB Chivenor Flood Defence Scheme Barnstaple, Devon: Archaeological Desk-based Assessment, 9-10 (Report - Assessment). SDV342125.

Other details: WA18.


Collings, A. G. + Manning, P. T. + Valentin, J., 2007, The North Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Phase 1. Archaeological Survey. Summary Report (Report - Assessment). SDV339712.

Braunton Great Field. Remains of open field system (many strips amalgamated, dividing baulks ploughed out etc). Documented in 1202. Other details: Survey number 1337.


Hegarty, C. + Knight, S., 2011 - 2012, North Devon Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty National Mapping Programme Project (Interpretation). SDV349018.

The cultivation pattern or distribution of baulks on Braunton Great Field as visible on RAF vertical aerial photographs taken from May to July 1946 was transcribed as part of the North Devon Coast AONB National Mapping Programme project. Only those open field cultivation strips indicated by differing crops were transcribed, as the subtle earthworks of the narrow baulks were not discernible even when the aerial photographs were viewed stereoscopically. Those inclosed parcels which previously were likely to have been part of the wider open field system were not transcribed. The transcribed pattern is not intended to be seen as definitive, but was recorded to illustrate the loss or amalgamation of parcels since the compilation of the Ordnance Survey second edition 15inch map.


Historic England, 29/07/2015, Braunton Great Field, Braunton, North Devon, Devon (Correspondence). SDV358850.

The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport has decided not to add Braunton Great Field to the Schedule of Monuments.

After examining all the records and other relevant information and having carefully considered the claims to significance of this case, the criteria for scheduling are not fulfilled.

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION DECISION
Braunton Great Field, although of clear landscape importance, is a much altered example of a medieval open field system and is not recommended for scheduling for the following principal reasons:
* Survival: the vast majority of the medieval strip fields have now been lost, whilst none of the baulks and headlands, having been reworked in modern land use, are believed to survive in their original form;
* Alteration: the amalgamation of the majority of the field strips has significantly eroded both the original field pattern and the medieval system of strip farming;
* Potential: given the effects of ploughing, the consolidation of strips and the loss of individual features, its potential to yield nationally important archaeological information is considered to be low;
* Management considerations: scheduling would not be effective in maintaining the continuation of medieval system of strip farming in the small number of fields that still retain their original dimensions.

See advice report for full details.


Unknown, Unknown, AV1187.10 (Aerial Photograph). SDV81695.

Other details: Black and White Oblique.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV140512Monograph: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1969. Westcountry Historical Studies. Westcountry Historical Studies. A5 Hardback. 129-151.
SDV17562Monograph: Hoskins, W. G.. 1954. A New Survey of England: Devon. A New Survey of England: Devon. A5 Hardback. 347.
SDV18873Report - Assessment: Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J.. 1992. Preliminary Archaeological Assessment, Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 92.32. A4 Stapled + Digital. 4.
SDV320933Article in Monograph: Hoskins, W. G.. 1952. The Making of the Agrarian Landscape. Devonshire Studies. 265-288.
SDV321171Aerial Photograph: Horner, B.. 1994. DAP/WO. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 20-24.
SDV325644Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1904 - 1906. Second Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Second Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Map (Digital).
SDV336495Article in Serial: Pearce, S. M.. 1985. The Early Church in the Landscape: The Evidence from North Devon (part). Archaeological Journal. 142. A4 Stapled + Digital. 268-269.
SDV338471Report - Assessment: Exeter Archaeology. 1997. Velator Industrial Link: Environmental Assessment. Volume II: Technical Annexes. Exeter Archaeology Report. Photocopy + Digital.
SDV339712Report - Assessment: Collings, A. G. + Manning, P. T. + Valentin, J.. 2007. The North Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Phase 1. Archaeological Survey. Summary Report. Exeter Archaeology Report. 06.22 (rev.1). A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV341027Report - non-specific: Turpin, J. W.. 1982. Braunton Great Field and Marshes. Devon County Council Report. A4 Stapled + Digital. 4-5.
SDV341028Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. 1951 - 1954. SS43NE15. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
SDV341030Article in Serial: Slee, A. H.. 1952. The Open Fields of Braunton. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 84. A5 Hardback. 142-9.
SDV341031Article in Serial: Phear, J. B.. 1889. Notes on Braunton Great Field. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 21. Photocopy. 201-204.
SDV341033Plan - measured: University College Swansea. 1981. Braunton Great Field. Unknown. Plan.
SDV341034Un-published: Champion, T. C.. Braunton and West Coast Local Plan: Objections to Policy BWC119. A4 Stapled.
SDV341036Report - Assessment: Exeter Archaeology. 1997. Velator Industrial Link: Environment Assessment. Volume I: Environmental Statement. Exeter Archaeology Report. Photocopy + Digital.
SDV341037Article in Serial: Stanes, R.. 1964. Open Field Agriculture in South Devon. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 96. Unknown. 73.
SDV341038Personal Comment: Sylvester, R. J.. 1977. Braunton Great Field. Unknown.
SDV341039Personal Comment: Timms, S. C.. 1981. Braunton Great Field. Unknown.
SDV341040Worksheet: Timms, S. C.. 1982. Braunton Great Field. Worksheet.
SDV341059Report - non-specific: Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit. 1994. Braunton Great Field Management Study. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV341192Cartographic: Unknown. Annotated Copies of Ordnance Survey Maps of Braunton Great Field. Unknown. Map (Paper).
SDV341193Pamphlet: Braunton Conservation Project. Braunton Great Field. A5 Paperback.
SDV341194Article in Serial: Brayshay, M. + Kelly, A.. 1988. Forrabury Common, Near Boscastle, Cornwall: the Ecology of an Open Field. Jounal of Environmental Management. 26. Photocopy. 277-297.
SDV341195Correspondence: Phillips, Sanders + Stubbs. 1985. Sales Details for Score Farm, Braunton. Sale Particulars. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV341197Correspondence: Phillips, Sanders + Stubbs. Broadlands, Braunton, North Devon. Sale Particulars. A4 Stapled.
SDV341198Correspondence: Timms, S. C.. 1988. A Note on English Heritage and the Braunton Great Field. Notes + Correspondence. A4 Stapled.
SDV341451Article in Serial: Stanes, R.. 1991. Braunton Great Field. North Devon Heritage. 3. A5 Paperback. 7-9.
SDV341452Monograph: Beresford, M. W. + St. Joseph, J. K.. 1979. Medieval England: An Aerial Survey. Unknown. 43-44.
SDV341453Article in Serial: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1949. The Open Field in Devonshire. Antiquity. 23. Unknown. 180-187.
SDV341454Unattributed Sites and Monuments Register Entry: Unknown. 1995. Unknown.
SDV342125Report - Assessment: Wessex Archaeology. 2007. RMB Chivenor Flood Defence Scheme Barnstaple, Devon: Archaeological Desk-based Assessment. Wessex Archaeology Report. 67300.01. A4 Stapled + Digital. 9-10.
SDV349018Interpretation: Hegarty, C. + Knight, S.. 2011 - 2012. North Devon Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty National Mapping Programme Project. AC Archaeology Report. ACD383/2/1. Digital.
Linked documents:1
SDV349927Aerial Photograph: Royal Air Force. 1946. RAF/106G/UK/1501. Royal Air Force Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). NMR RAF/106G/UK/1501 4007-4008 13-MAY-1946.
SDV349996Aerial Photograph: Royal Air Force. 1946. RAF/106G/UK/1655. Royal Air Force Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). NMR RAF/106G/UK/1655 3364-3365 11-JUL-1946.
SDV358850Correspondence: Historic England. 29/07/2015. Braunton Great Field, Braunton, North Devon, Devon. Notification of Designation Decision. Digital.
SDV361490Article in Serial: Harris, H.. 1985. Great Field's Future Hangs in Balance. Western Morning News. Photocopy + Digital.
SDV4711Report - Assessment: Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J.. 1993. Archaeological Assessment of SWW Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 93.25. A4 Stapled + Digital. 3, 6.
SDV4712Report - Assessment: Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J.. 1993. Archaeological Assessment of SWW Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements, Part 1: Southern Routes. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 93.32. A4 Stapled + Digital. 3.
SDV64198Monograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1988. Devon's Past. An Aerial View. Devon's Past. An Aerial View. Paperback Volume. 96.
SDV74027Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 18/12/1985. DAP/FU. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 7-11.
SDV7961Aerial Photograph: Horner, B.. 1995. DAP/YV. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 27.
SDV81689Monograph: Pearce, S. M.. 1981. The Archaeology of South West Britain. The Archaeology of South West Britain. Hardback Volume. 83-84.
SDV81690Report - Assessment: Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J.. 1993. Archaeological Assessment of NRA Braunton Tidal Defence Scheme. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 93.36. A4 Stapled + Digital. 2.
SDV81695Aerial Photograph: Unknown. Unknown. AV1187.10. West Air Photography. Photograph (Paper) + Digital (Scan).
SDV81696Aerial Photograph: Royal Air Force. 753-5/81. RAF Chivenor. Unknown.
SDV81704Monograph: Millward, R. + Robinson, A.. 1971. North Devon and North Cornwall. 73-79.
SDV81711Aerial Photograph: Ordnance Survey. 73/163/031. Unknown.
SDV81712Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1984. DAP/DW. Devon Aerial Photograph. 1, 2.
SDV81713Aerial Photograph: Unknown. ENG/8685. Unknown.
SDV81720Report - Assessment: Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J.. 1993. Archaeological Assessment of SWW Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements, Part 2: Northern Route N1A. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 93.33. A4 Stapled + Digital. 2.

Associated Monuments

MDV16296Related to: Braunton (Monument)
MDV11858Related to: Braunton Down Field System (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV4407 - NRA Braunton Tidal Defence Scheme Summary of Archaeological Recording
  • EDV4490 - RMB Chivenor Flood Defence Scheme Barnstaple, Devon: Archaeological Desk-based Assessment
  • EDV941 - Braunton Great Field Site Visit
  • EDV942 - Braunton Great Field Site Visit
  • EDV943 - Braunton Great Field Site Visit
  • EDV944 - Braunton Great Field Site Visit
  • EDV945 - Braunton Great Field Survey
  • EDV946 - Archaeological Assessment of NRA Braunton Tidal Defence Scheme
  • EDV956 - Braunton Great Field
  • EDV958 - Preliminary Archaeological Assessment, Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements
  • EDV959 - Archaeological Assessment of SWW Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements
  • EDV960 - Archaeological Assessment of SWW Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements, Part 1: Southern Routes
  • EDV961 - Archaeological Assessment of SWW Taw-Torridge Tidal Waters Improvements, Part 2: Northern Route N1A
  • EDV963 - Velator Industrial Link: Environment Assessment
  • EDV6132 - North Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty NMP Project

Date Last Edited:Jun 27 2018 3:18PM