HeritageGateway - Home
Site Map
Text size: A A A
You are here: Home > > > > Devon & Dartmoor HER Result
Devon & Dartmoor HERPrintable version | About Devon & Dartmoor HER | Visit Devon & Dartmoor HER online...

See important guidance on the use of this record.

If you have any comments or new information about this record, please email us.


HER Number:MDV2807
Name:Settlement at Bantham Ham

Summary

Large settlement site at Bantham Ham at the mouth of the River Avon, with evidence of occupation from the Bronze Age through to the Medieval period. In particular the evidence points to an extensive and rich post-Roman occupation with finds such as Mediterranean amphorae indicating international trade.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 663 436
Map Sheet:SX64SE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishThurlestone
DistrictSouth Hams
Ecclesiastical ParishTHURLESTONE

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX64SE/10
  • Old SAM County Ref: 8
  • Old SAM Ref: 33760
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division: SX64SE21
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division: SX64SE4
  • SHINE Candidate (Yes)

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • SETTLEMENT (Early Iron Age to XVI - 700 BC to 1600 AD (Between))

Full description

Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, SX64SE4 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV147943.

Other details: Diagram.


Silvester, R. J., Untitled Source (Personal Comment). SDV343502.

The manufacture of spindlewhorls was an important activity in the Post-Roman period.


Elliott, E. A. S., 1901, On Some Earthworks in the South Hams Probably Concerned in the Irishmen's Raid, 475-83 (Article in Serial). SDV321206.

Two extensive kitchen middens, shells, spindlewhorls, stone axes, pottery, horn and metal combs, rusted spearheads and fish hooks, bone implements and flint arrowheads found. Possibly Roman.


Jenkins, H. L., 1902, Ancient Camp at the Mouth of the Avon, 21-22 (Article in Serial). SDV147927.

The site of an ancient camp, surrounded on three sides by the sea and on the fourth side by a marsh. There are refuse heaps composed of shells, bones, and teeth, mainly of domestic animals. The lines of the earthwork are so obliterated by blown sand and by bent grass as only to be traceable when looked at from the hills when the sun is low. The middens were brought to light in modern times by a great storm, "the November" gale of 1703. There was considerable encroachment of the sea revealing the refuse of the middens. Miss Fox, writing 50 years ago, relates that cartloads of bones were taken away for manure. The earthworks are no doubt Roman, but the contents of the refuse heaps indicate Pre-Roman occupation. Other details: Illustration.


Wall, J. C., 1906, Ancient Earthworks, 580 (Article in Monograph). SDV341465.

Bantham Camp. The entrenchments have been extensive, but are now obliterated by drifting sands. The camp has been described as rectangular but now takes no definite form. Piles, pointed by burning, found in the marsh, indicate very early occupation.


Office of Works, 1922, Bantham Camp (Schedule Document). SDV339848.

The plot of common on which it stands is called Bantham Ham. The earthwork is so swept and altered by shifting sandhills that its original form seems unrecognisable. Any great gale from the south-west to which it is completely exposed may fill up (perhaps permanently) the apparent fosses, or on the contrary may open new ones. The "strategical" purpose (whatever its original size and shape) is unmistakable. It commanded the mouth of the Avon and the road thence to the great ganglion of old roads at Churchstow. The coast is suffering from erosion and the whole hillside above cut and trimmed for golf links, which now extend to Longstone. Other details: Map.


Beckerlegge, J. J., 1940, Ninth report of the Plymouth and District Branch, 153 (Article in Serial). SDV147947.

Small camp at Bantham believed to be of the Roman period. Pottery indicated a long period of occupation from the early Bronze Age through the Roman period and into the late Celtic era.


Adams, E. A. + Dewey, H., 1950, Spindle Whorls Found in Devonshire, 327 (Article in Serial). SDV147932.

Six spindlewhorls found at this site, of flint, oyster-shell, gritty slate and pot.


Fox, A., 1954, Twenty-First Report on the Archaeology and Early History of Devon, 277-278 (Article in Serial). SDV147928.

Jenkins finds are re-assessed by Fox; these include Iron Age, Dark Age and medieval pottery, a stone axe, spindlewhorls, the top of a lamp, two double-sided bone combs, and 2 split-socketed iron javelin heads.


Fox, A., 1955, A Dark Age Trading Site at Bantham, 53-67 (Article in Serial). SDV147929.

Pottery has also been found at the south end of the sandhills, where a dark occupation layer has produced shells, domestic animal bones, red deer antler, and Dark Age pottery. There is no sign of ancient structures, and the site is unlikely to have been defensive. The archaeological evidence suggests an open settlement of several periods (including Iron Age, Dark Age and medieval), which Fox interprets as a trading centre. The finds from Bantham are discussed and illustrated in this article. Other details: Illustration and Figure.


Laing, L., 1975, Untitled Source, 133 (Monograph). SDV147934.


Silvester, R. J., 1981, An Excavation on the Post-Roman Site at Bantham, South Devon, 89-118 (Article in Serial). SDV147945.

In the light of the 1978 excavations Lady Fox's theory is worth reconsidering after being dismissed in recent years. The dunes may have been a location, possibly seasonal, where imported goods were off-loaded and it is possible some sort of mart existed. With the discovery of re-used Roman sherds, presumably collected from a deserted site nearby, it can be argued that the Iron Age sherds may have reached the site in a similar manner, and the Bronze Age and medieval finds may have little significance in terms of settlement.


Robinson, R., 1983, List of Field Monument Warden Visits 1983 (Un-published). SDV345762.

Department of Environment Field Monument Warden site visit on 3rd February 1983.


Griffith, F. M., 1983, Untitled Source, 5 (Article in Serial). SDV147933.

In 1982 during drainage work indicated that the site is considerably larger than had previously been thought. Large quantities of bone were visible in a culvert trench, which accords well with the 19th century account of 'cartloads of bones' and part of a small hearth was seen. The whole area of Bantham Ham should be regarded as of potential archaeological significance. The main part of the site falls within the scheduled area of Bantham Camp and an application to extend the area and include the site of these observations has been made.


Griffith, F. M., 1986, DAP/FW, 7-9a (Aerial Photograph). SDV147956.


Griffith, F. M., 1986, DAP/HS, 2 (Aerial Photograph). SDV147957.


Griffith, F. M., 1986, Salvage Observations at the Dark Age Site at Bantham Ham, Thurlestone, in 1982, 39-57 (Article in Serial). SDV147936.

Bantham Ham is recognised as a coastal trading site of sub-Roman/Dark Age date. The results of salvage recording of drainage works in 1982 are examined as well as the interpretation of the site. The appendices 1,2,3 and 4 discuss radiocarbon dates, pottery and shells from the site and evidence for bone working at Bantham. Other details: Diagrams, Photograph.


Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, 1986, SX64SE21 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV147937.

These defensive earthworks were not identified. The scheduled area of approximately 3 hectares is more or less completely covered by sand dunes. The wind-blown sand is constantly moving and neither the old land surface nor the area of digging (?quarrying) depicted on the 6 inch map were evident at the time of investigation. Efforts are being made to stabilise the dunes, large areas have been fenced off and grass bracken and scrub are becoming established around the fringes. If these operations are successful this monument whatever its nature, can for all reasonable purposes be said to be obliterated.


Griffith, F. M., 1986, Untitled Source (Personal Comment). SDV321224.

The use by Ordnance Survey of the term 'obliterated' is unwarranted in a dune environment. The 'earthworks' described earlier may be either destroyed or buried.


Griffith, F., 1988, Devon's Past. An Aerial View, 63 (Monograph). SDV64198.


Department of National Heritage, 1995, Proposed Works at Bantham Camp, Thurlestone, Devon (Correspondence). SDV147938.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for fencing, the erection of sand trap barriers and planting of marram grass.


Horner, W., 1998, DAP/ACB, 1, 2 (Aerial Photograph). SDV141771.


Quinnell, H., 1998, Later Prehistoric Pottery Survey (Report - Survey). SDV336212.

Two sherds of Middle/Late Iron Age pot, recovered during casual pick up. Also found Roman and other pottery. Current location is unknown. Other details: DBID:1773.


Griffith, F. M. + Reed, S. J., 1998, Rescue Recording at Bantham Ham in 1997, 109-131 (Article in Serial). SDV147960.

Archaeological recording was undertaken in 1997 when a new soakaway was constructed at Bantham Ham. Two sides of an enclosure to the south-east of the settlement were observed and Romano-British material was recovered.


Dyer, M. J. + Collings, A. G., 1999, Archaeological Assessment and Recording at Homefield Farm, Thurlestone, 2 (Report - Assessment). SDV321226.


Griffith, F. M. + Reed, S. J., 2000, Rescue Recording at Bantham Ham in 1997 (Report - non-specific). SDV321241.


Hines, J., 2000, Welsh and English: Mutual Origins in Post-Roman Britain, 81-104 (Article in Serial). SDV147961.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2002, Roman Settlement Site at Bantham Ham (Schedule Document). SDV339849.

Large Roman and post-Roman settlement site with evidence for earlier and later occupation, buried by sand dunes at the mouth of the River Avon. It lies behind a popular holiday beach, and part of its car park occupies the site. Bantham Ham has been known as an early settlement since the early 18th century when a storm exposed midden deposits, while in the mid-19th century, cartloads of bones were taken for fertiliser from the marsh on the south side of the site, then being drained. Timber piles, pointed by burning, were also found here. Pottery and bone artefacts collected from the dune area in 1902 were found in the 1950s to be of Late Roman or post-Roman date. These included spindle whorls, bone combs and amphora sherds, dating from the fifth to seventh centuries AD. An archaeological excavation in the centre of the dunes in 1978 found evidence for a temporary encampment of the same period with rough shelters and hearths. Finds suggested that a seasonal trading market had operated here at that time. A watching brief in 1982 showed that this occupation extended to the southern edge of the dunes. Monitoring of pipe trenches in the car park east of the dunes in 1997 revealed two earthwork banks, faced with coursed and herring-bone clay bonded masonry. A shell midden was associated with these walls and pottery sherds suggested a fourth to fifth century date. A rescue excavation in 2001 on the site of a lifeguard's hut at the south end of the beach revealed extensive and well-preserved deeply stratified deposits of the late 5th to early 6th century AD. These included several superimposed occupation layers containing iron smithing hearths, evidence for post built structures and many thousands of artefacts. These included butchered animal bones, metal pins and blades and pottery, comprising Cornish native wares, imported amphorae from the eastern Mediterranean and north African red slipped tablewares. Residual material in these layers included painted plaster and roofing tiles, suggesting the existence of an earlier Roman building nearby. Other finds on Bantham Ham during the 19th century include a Neolithic polished stone axe, Bronze Age arrowheads and Iron Age pottery. Later medieval and post-medieval finds are also known, including possible burials of shipwrecked sailors. A small number of earthworks survive on the Ham. An earth bank runs along the south side of a metalled road which bounds the north side of the car park. This is 3.2 metres wide by 0.7 metres high and 70 metres long, being truncated by later roads at both ends. There are traces of a revetment wall along its north side, 0.7 metres wide. Its position and size suggest that it is related to the Late Roman period banks found in 1997, immediately to its south. Other earthworks include a later medieval corn ditch, enclosing fields to the east of the Ham. This is about 3 metres wide, revetted on its north and west sides by a coursed drystone wall about 1.5 metres high. The bank slopes inwards behind this wall. The hillslope north of the car park contains a number of medieval lynchets, terraced into the hillslope. Other details: Map.


Blaylock, S. + Neophytou, M., 2004, South Milton Sands & Southdown Farm: Initial archaeological assessment, 6 (Report - Assessment). SDV323350.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2005, Proposed Works at Bantham Ham, Devon (Correspondence). SDV321228.

Repairs/improvements to tarmacadam roads leading to both the car park and to private residences on Bantham Ham, are to be undertaken under Class 5 of the Ancient Monuments (Class Consent) Order 1994, due to the interests of health and safety.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2005, Proposed Works at Roman Settlement Site at Bantham Ham, Thurlestone, Devon (Correspondence). SDV321227.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for works concerning the excavation of a pipe trench for the renewal of the water pipes feeding the toilets, subject to conditions.


Griffith, F. M. + Wilkes, E. M., 2006, The Land Named from the Sea? Coastal Archaeology and Place-names of Bigbury Bay, Devon, 71, 81 (Article in Serial). SDV339814.

The settlement at Bantham may have been a landing site for trading local and continental goods. The topographical position of Bantham suggests an origin from 'hamm' meaning 'land hemmed in by water'. The first element of Bantham may derive from the Old English 'beonet' meaning course vegetation or from 'ban' meaning a bone from the quantity of bone found in the area.


English Heritage, 2009, Heritage at Risk Register 2009: South West, 110 (Report - non-specific). SDV342694.

Generally satisfactory condition, but with significant localised problems.


English Heritage, 2010, Heritage at Risk Register 2010: South West, 103 (Report - non-specific). SDV344777.


Reed, S.J. + Bidwell, P. + Allan, J., 2011, Excavation at Bantham, South Devon, and Post-Roman Trade in South-West England (Article in Serial). SDV349968.

Excavations at Bantham Ham in 2001 revealed evidence for a sequence of post-Roman occupation with radiocarbon dates centred on the late 5th and 6th centuries. Features included hearths, pits, a midden and a substantial ditch. Finds (recorded under the event EDV5991) included ironworking slag, vessel glass, bone, charred plant remains and pottery. In particular, an unusually large and well-preserved assemblage of Mediterranean amphorae was recovered. Second only in quantity to Tintagel this assemblage is of great significance in the study of links between western Britain and the Mediterranean in the post-Roman period.
Although finds and features relating to activity and occupation from the prehistoric period to at least the Middle Ages have been found at Bantham Ham, most can be attributed to the post-Roman period. The excavations in 2001 served to emphasise the extent and richness of the site's post-Roman occupation. The site appears to have served as a focus for international trade and it is suggested that, rather than a market site or trading post, Bantham Ham was a port. It is suggested that it was probably one of several post-Roman settlements on the South Devon coast engaged in international trade and which had its origins in the prehistoric period. See article for full details.


English Heritage, 2011, Heritage at Risk Register 2011: South West, 108 (Report - non-specific). SDV355280.

Generally satisfactory condition, but with significant localised problems. Declining. Principal vulnerability moderate visitor erosion.


Corcos, N., 2011, Land at Fremington Army Camp, Fremington, North Devon: Archaeological Desk-Based Assessment, 10 (Report - Assessment). SDV348712.


Duggan, M. C., 2016, Links to Late Antiquity. Understanding Contacts on the Atlantic Seaboard in the 5th to 7th Centuries AD, 153-167, figs 4.2-4.7 (Post-Graduate Thesis). SDV359586.

Bantham is featured in Duggan's consideration of imported 5th and 6th century Mediterranean pottery in its wider context and the nature of the exchange and contact between Britain, the Atlantic seaboard and the Mediterranean.


Duggan, M. C., 2018, Links to Late Antiquity. Ceramic exchange and contacts on the Atlantic Seaboard in the 5th to 7th centuries AD, 70-77, figs 4.2-4.7 (Article in Serial). SDV363192.

Bantham was previously interpreted (Silvester, 1981 and Thomas, 1985 etc.) as a 'beach-market' site (rather than a centre of local political power); thought to have been the site of seasonal exchange. Recent excavations in 2001 (Reed et al, 2011) at the site however suggest this needs revision and the site appears to have served as an important port site. Duggan considers the assemblage of amphorae; 52 vessels have been identified at Bantham, which although far fewer than Tintagel's 150 vessels, is still far greater than many other comparable South West sites. Also, Bantham's sherds from the recent excavations were typically larger and may indicate a potentially larger assemblage (especially as excavation has only examined a small area of the site).
Identification of the LRA 1 'Bantham-type' represents the first example f this variant amphora type from Britain which might have equivalent examples in Spain; demonstrating a possible Iberian connection with Bantham (potentially supported by the thick-walled amphorae recovered). Also significant is the possible identification of a coarseware vessel from Vigo, hinting at a connection with north-west Spain.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV141771Aerial Photograph: Horner, W.. 1998. DAP/ACB. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 1, 2.
SDV147927Article in Serial: Jenkins, H. L.. 1902. Ancient Camp at the Mouth of the Avon. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 2. Unknown. 21-22.
SDV147928Article in Serial: Fox, A.. 1954. Twenty-First Report on the Archaeology and Early History of Devon. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 86. A5 Hardback. 277-278.
SDV147929Article in Serial: Fox, A.. 1955. A Dark Age Trading Site at Bantham. Antiquity. 35. Unknown. 53-67.
SDV147932Article in Serial: Adams, E. A. + Dewey, H.. 1950. Spindle Whorls Found in Devonshire. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 82. A5 Hardback. 327.
SDV147933Article in Serial: Griffith, F. M.. 1983. Devon Archaeological Society Newsletter. 24. A4 Stapled. 5.
SDV147934Monograph: Laing, L.. 1975. Archaeology of Late Celtic Britain and Ireland. Unknown. 133.
SDV147936Article in Serial: Griffith, F. M.. 1986. Salvage Observations at the Dark Age Site at Bantham Ham, Thurlestone, in 1982. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 44. Paperback Volume. 39-57.
SDV147937Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. 1986. SX64SE21. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
SDV147938Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1995. Proposed Works at Bantham Camp, Thurlestone, Devon. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV147943Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. SX64SE4. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
SDV147945Article in Serial: Silvester, R. J.. 1981. An Excavation on the Post-Roman Site at Bantham, South Devon. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 39. Paperback Volume. 89-118.
SDV147947Article in Serial: Beckerlegge, J. J.. 1940. Ninth report of the Plymouth and District Branch. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 72. A5 Hardback. 153.
SDV147956Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1986. DAP/FW. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 7-9a.
SDV147957Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1986. DAP/HS. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 2.
SDV147960Article in Serial: Griffith, F. M. + Reed, S. J.. 1998. Rescue Recording at Bantham Ham in 1997. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 56. Paperback Volume. 109-131.
SDV147961Article in Serial: Hines, J.. 2000. Welsh and English: Mutual Origins in Post-Roman Britain. Studia Celtica. 34. Photocopy. 81-104.
SDV321206Article in Serial: Elliott, E. A. S.. 1901. On Some Earthworks in the South Hams Probably Concerned in the Irishmen's Raid. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 33. A5 Hardback. 475-83.
SDV321224Personal Comment: Griffith, F. M.. 1986.
SDV321226Report - Assessment: Dyer, M. J. + Collings, A. G.. 1999. Archaeological Assessment and Recording at Homefield Farm, Thurlestone. Exeter Archaeology Report. 99.61. A4 Stapled + Digital. 2.
SDV321227Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2005. Proposed Works at Roman Settlement Site at Bantham Ham, Thurlestone, Devon. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV321228Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2005. Proposed Works at Bantham Ham, Devon. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV321241Report - non-specific: Griffith, F. M. + Reed, S. J.. 2000. Rescue Recording at Bantham Ham in 1997. Exeter Archaeology Report. 98.85. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV323350Report - Assessment: Blaylock, S. + Neophytou, M.. 2004. South Milton Sands & Southdown Farm: Initial archaeological assessment. National Trust Archaeological Survey Report. A4 Stapled + Digital. 6.
SDV336212Report - Survey: Quinnell, H.. 1998. Later Prehistoric Pottery Survey. Later Prehistoric Pottery Survey. A4 Spiral Bound.
SDV339814Article in Serial: Griffith, F. M. + Wilkes, E. M.. 2006. The Land Named from the Sea? Coastal Archaeology and Place-names of Bigbury Bay, Devon. Archaeological Journal. 163. A5 Paperback. 71, 81.
SDV339848Schedule Document: Office of Works. 1922. Bantham Camp. The Schedule of Monuments. Foolscap.
SDV339849Schedule Document: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2002. Roman Settlement Site at Bantham Ham. The Schedule of Monuments. A4 Stapled.
SDV341465Article in Monograph: Wall, J. C.. 1906. Ancient Earthworks. Victoria History of the County of Devon. Hardback Volume. 580.
SDV342694Report - non-specific: English Heritage. 2009. Heritage at Risk Register 2009: South West. English Heritage Report. A4 Bound +Digital. 110.
SDV343502Personal Comment: Silvester, R. J..
SDV344777Report - non-specific: English Heritage. 2010. Heritage at Risk Register 2010: South West. English Heritage Report. Digital. 103.
SDV345762Un-published: Robinson, R.. 1983. List of Field Monument Warden Visits 1983. Lists of Field Monument Warden Visits. Printout.
SDV348712Report - Assessment: Corcos, N.. 2011. Land at Fremington Army Camp, Fremington, North Devon: Archaeological Desk-Based Assessment. Avon Archaeological Unit Report. A4 Stapled + Digital. 10.
SDV349968Article in Serial: Reed, S.J. + Bidwell, P. + Allan, J.. 2011. Excavation at Bantham, South Devon, and Post-Roman Trade in South-West England. Medieval Archaeology. 55. Digital.
SDV355280Report - non-specific: English Heritage. 2011. Heritage at Risk Register 2011: South West. english Heritage. Digital. 108.
SDV359586Post-Graduate Thesis: Duggan, M. C.. 2016. Links to Late Antiquity. Understanding Contacts on the Atlantic Seaboard in the 5th to 7th Centuries AD. University of Newcastle. A4 Hardback. 153-167, figs 4.2-4.7.
SDV363192Article in Serial: Duggan, M. C.. 2018. Links to Late Antiquity. Ceramic exchange and contacts on the Atlantic Seaboard in the 5th to 7th centuries AD. British Archaeological Reports. 639. Paperback Volume. 70-77, figs 4.2-4.7.
SDV64198Monograph: Griffith, F.. 1988. Devon's Past. An Aerial View. Devon's Past. An Aerial View. Paperback Volume. 63.

Associated Monuments

MDV14371Parent of: Bantham Ham, Midden (Monument)
MDV2808Parent of: Pottery from Bantham Ham, Bigbury (Find Spot)
MDV2808Related to: Pottery from Bantham Ham, Bigbury (Find Spot)
MDV4849Related to: Amphora at Meadowsfoot Beach (Find Spot)
MDV63939Related to: Bantham Ham, Hearth (Monument)
MDV63940Related to: Bantham Ham, Hearth (Monument)
MDV4842Related to: Bolt Tail Camp, Marlborough (Monument)
MDV4848Related to: Early Medieval Settlement at Meadowsfoot Beach (Monument)
MDV63938Related to: Enclosure at Bantham Ham (Monument)
MDV40102Related to: Enclosures near Mount Folly Farm, Bigbury (Monument)
MDV2808Parent of: Pottery from Bantham Ham, Bigbury (Find Spot)
MDV2808Related to: Pottery from Bantham Ham, Bigbury (Find Spot)
MDV50170Related to: Rectilinear enclosure at Orchard House, Modbury (Monument)

Associated Finds

  • FDV228 - LAMP (Unknown date)
  • FDV229 - WEAPON (Unknown date)
  • FDV226 - ARROWHEAD (Prehistoric - 698000 BC to 42 AD)
  • FDV227 - BONE NON SPECIFIC (Iron Age - 700 BC to 42 AD)
  • FDV219 - SHERD (Iron Age - 700 BC to 42 AD)
  • FDV217 - Axe (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV221 - COMB (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV222 - COMB (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV223 - COMB (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV225 - FISH HOOK (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV218 - SHERD (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV224 - SPEAR (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV213 - SPINDLE WHORL (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV214 - SPINDLE WHORL (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV215 - SPINDLE WHORL (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV216 - SPINDLE WHORL (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV220 - SHERD (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)

Associated Events

  • EDV1133 - Field Monument Warden Visit
  • EDV2692 - Initial archaeological assessment of South Milton Sands & Southdown Farm
  • EDV5991 - Excavation at Bantham Ham, South Devon

Date Last Edited:Aug 28 2019 10:20AM