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HER Number:MDV33705
Name:47 New Street, Chagford

Summary

Early 16th century hall house with major late 16th and 17th century improvements, divided into cottages in 19th century, reunited and modernized circa 1980. The older parts of the walls are coursed blocks of dressed granite but much has been rebuilt in granite stone rubble; granite stacks with granite ashlar chimney shafts; slate roof (formerly thatch).

Location

Grid Reference:SX 701 872
Map Sheet:SX78NW
Admin AreaDartmoor National Park
Civil ParishChagford
DistrictWest Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishCHAGFORD

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX78NW/218
  • Old Listed Building Ref (II)

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • CROSS PASSAGE HOUSE (XV to XVI - 1500 AD to 1550 AD (Between))
  • COTTAGE NON SPECIFIC (XVIII to XIX - 1800 AD to 1899 AD (Between))

Full description

Devon County Council, 1838-1848, Tithe Mosaic, approximately 1838-1848 (Cartographic). SDV349431.

Depicted on the Tithe Map; 35 on the apportionment.


Ordnance Survey, 1880-1899, First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map (Cartographic). SDV336179.

Late 19th century historic map shows the property has been divided into two cottages by this time.


Department of Environment, 1987, Chagford, 120 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV350463.

No 47, New Street, Chagford. House, formerly two cottages but was originally built as a single house. Early 16th century with major late 16th and 17th century improvements, divided into cottages in 19th century, reunited and modernized circa 1980. The older parts of the walls are coursed blocks of dressed granite but much has been rebuilt in granite stone rubble; granite stacks with granite ashlar chimney shafts; slate roof (formerly thatch).
Three room and through passage plan house built along the street and facing east. The hall fireplace was inserted in the late 16th century. The original house was apparently open to the roof. In the later 16th and 17th century the house was progressively floored leaving the hall till last. Site of original stair or stairs is not known. Two storeys with single storey outshots across rear.
Irregular 5 window front of 20th century horned 4 pane sashes. Most has timber lintels. The roof butts those of the adjoining houses.
Good interior of a house with a long and complex structural history. The oldest part of the house is the roof. It is 4 bays and carried on 3 raised true cruck trusses with slightly cambered collars. It is smoke-blackened from end to end indicating that the original house was all open to the roof, divided by low partitions and heated by an open hearth fire. Oak plank and muntin screen. See List for full details.


Ordnance Survey, 2016, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV359352.


Historic England, 2016, National Heritage List for England (National Heritage List for England). SDV359353.

SX 7087 CHAGFORD NEW STREET, Chagford, 6/154 No 47 -GV II
House, formerly 2 cottages but was originally built as a single house. Early C16 with major late C16 and C17 improvements, divided into cottages in C19, reunited and modernised circa 1980. The older parts of the walls are coursed blocks of dressed granite but much has been rebuilt in granite stone rubble; granite stacks with granite ashlar chimney shafts; slate roof (formerly thatch).
Plan and development: 3-room-and-through-passage plan house built along the street and facing east. There is a small unheated inner room at the left (southern) end. The hall has an axial stack backing onto the passage and the service end room has an end stack. The original house was apparently open to the roof throughout, divided by low partition screens and heated by an open hearth fire. In the later C16 and C17 the house was progressively floored leaving the hall till last. The hall fireplace was inserted in the late C16. In the C19 the service end room was divided off as a separate cottage and then given its stack, and it was reunited circa 1980. Site of original stair or stairs is not known. 2 storeys with single storey outshots across rear.
Exterior: Irregular 5-window front of C20 horned 4-pane sashes. Most have timber lintels but the two ground floor right have C19 segmental arches of granite voussoirs. The left end one is blocking the C19 cottage doorway. The front passage doorway is set a little right of centre and contains a plank door circa 1980. The roof butts those of the adjoining houses.
Good interior of a house with a long and complex structural history. The oldest part of the house is the roof. It is 4 bays and carried on 3 raised true cruck trusses with slightly cambered collars. It is smoke-blackened from end to end indicating that the original house was all open to the roof, divided by low partitions and heated by an open hearth fire. The hall-inner room partition may well be one of the original low partition screens. It is an oak plank-and-muntin screen, the muntins chamfered with worn (maybe step) stops, and it contains shoulder-headed doorway. The inner room end was probably the first to be floored over but the ceiling structure there has been replaced at a higher level. Nevertheless the first floor chamber evidently jettied out into the upper end of the open hall, its framed crosswall surviving on the first floor and filling the old truss there. The ceiling of the service end and passage also appears to be a replacement. The truss this end was also once filled with large framing and wattle and daub but is now open and the cruck feet have been cut away. (The truss now rests on oak corbels). The hall stack was probably inserted in the late C16. It contains a large granite fireplace with chamfered surround and side oven. The relieving arch over the granite ashlar lintel now shows on the first floor. The hall was floored over in the early or mid C17 using half beams each end, both moulded with bar-step stops. The C19 service end fireplace was rebuilt circa 1980 with a new granite lintel.
This is an interesting urban late medieval hall-house which also forms one of a group of listed buildings along the western side of New Street.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV336179Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1880-1899. First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map. First Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Map (Digital).
SDV349431Cartographic: Devon County Council. 1838-1848. Tithe Mosaic, approximately 1838-1848. Digitised Tithe Map. Digital.
SDV350463List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1987. Chagford. Historic Houses Register. A4 Bound. 120.
SDV359352Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2016. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital. [Mapped feature: #88074 ]
SDV359353National Heritage List for England: Historic England. 2016. National Heritage List for England. Historic Houses Register. Digital.

Associated Monuments

MDV33169Related to: 41 New Street, Chagford (Building)
MDV33168Related to: 49 New Street, Chagford (Building)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:Feb 1 2016 11:00AM