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HER Number:MDV37241
Name:1-3 Thatch Cottages, Liverton

Summary

Row of three cottages, probably a single farmhouse originally. 16th or 17th century; No. 1 enlarged and extended at the front in early 19th century. Lean-to additions at rear. Roughcast cob and stone. Thatched roofs, half-hipped at left-hand end.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 804 751
Map Sheet:SX87NW
Admin AreaDartmoor National Park
Civil ParishIlsington
DistrictTeignbridge
Ecclesiastical ParishILSINGTON

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX87NW/161
  • Old Listed Building Ref (II)

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • FARMHOUSE (Built, XV to XVII - 1500 AD to 1699 AD (Between))
  • COTTAGE NON SPECIFIC (Altered, XVIII to XIX - 1751 AD? to 1880 AD (Between))

Full description

Ordnance Survey, 1880-1899, First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map (Cartographic). SDV336179.

The late 19th century historic map shows the building has been subdivided into separate dwellings by this time.


Department of Environment, 1986, Ilsington, 74 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV282617.

Nos 1, 2 and 3 Old Cottage. Row of three cottages, probably a single farmhouse originally. 16th or 17th century; No. 1 enlarged and extended at the front in early 19th century. Lean-to additions at rear. Roughcast cob and stone. Thatched roofs, half-hipped at left-hand end. Yellow brick chimneystack in right-hand gable of No. 1; large rendered stack just behind the ridge of No. 2, off-centre to right; smaller rendered stack with 20th century brick shaft on top at No. 3, on ridge off-centre to right.
Original plan uncertain, but house must have had at least three ground-storey rooms. Two storeys. Each cottage has one upper storey window, but this gives no idea of the length of the building. No. 1 (the right-hand cottage) has a 20th century glazed door and wooden canopy to left; one 19th century casement window in each storey to right. No. 2 has an old plank door, off-centre to right; one 19th century casement window at far left of each storey, the upper-storey window pushing up into the thatch. No. 3 has an old plank door with wrought-iron strap-hinges at right-hand end; a 19th century casement window at left-hand end of each storey and a small 19th century window in centre of ground storey, the upper-storey window pushing up into the thatch. All windows have two lights with six panes each, except at No. 3 where the two left hand casements have an extra 1/2-pane at the outer edge of each light; the small window has a fixed 4-pane sash. In the back wall no 2 has a late 16th or 17th century wood-mullioned window of 2-lights in the ground storey, this having flat-splay mullions and rectangular leaded panes; in second storey is a 2-light wood mullioned window of late 18th or early 19th century with small panes.
Interior: No. 2 has in ground storey a large gable fireplace with chamfered wood lintel having straight-cut stops. Chamfered upper-floor beam without stops. The cottage was stripped for repair when inspected in 1985 and it was clear that the projecting front section was a later addition; the partition wall with No. 2 is thin and there is no division at all at roof level. No. 2 has heavy upper floor joists running from front to back. The left-hand second storey room has a side-pegged jointed-cruck truss, covered with plaster. There are some good 19th century plank doors, one having a wooden bolt.
Interior of No. 3 not inspected, but it is reported to have a stud-and-panel screen in the ground storey, dividing it from No. 2; also a large open fireplace with bread oven. The building is the best preserved in Liverton, retaining its 19th century character almost intact. No. 2 is similarly well preserved inside, retaining many of its old plaster wall and ceiling surfaces.


Ordnance Survey, 2018, MasterMap 2018 (Cartographic). SDV360652.

'Thatch Cottages' depicted on the modern mapping.


Historic England, 2018, National Heritage List for England (National Heritage List for England). SDV360653.

ILSINGTON LIVERTON SX 87 NW 4/106 Nos 1, 2 and 3 Old Cottage - GV II
How of 3 cottages, probably a single farmhouse originally. C16 or C17; No. 1 enlarged and extended at the front in early C19. Lean-to additions at rear. Roughcast cob and stone. Thatched roofs, half-hipped at left-hand end. Yellow brick chimneystack in right-hand gable of No. 1; large rendered stack just behind the ridge of No. 2, off-centre to right; smaller rendered stack with C20 brick shaft on top at No. 3, on ridge off-centre to right.
Original plan uncertain, but house must have had at least 3 ground-storey rooms. 2 storeys. Each cottage has 1 upper storey window, but this gives no idea of the length of the building. No. 1 (the right-hand cottage) has a C20 glazed door and wooden canopy to left; 1 C19 casement window in each storey to right. No. 2 has an old plank door, off-centre to right; 1 C19 casement window at far left of each storey, the upper-storey window pushing up into the thatch. No. 3 has an old plank door with wrought-iron strap-hinges at right-hand end; a C19 casement window at left-hand end of each storey and a small C19 window in centre of ground storey, the upper-storey window pushing up into the thatch. All windows have 2 lights with 6 panes each, except at No. 3 where the 2 left hand casements have an extra ½-pane at the outer edge of each light; the small window has a fixed 4-pane sash. In the back wall No. 2 has a late C16 or C17 wood- mullioned window of 2-lights in the ground storey, this having flat-splay mullions and rectangular leaded panes; in second storey is a 2-light wood mullioned window of late C18 or early C19 with small panes. Interior: No. 2 has in ground storey a large gable fireplace with chamfered wood lintel having straight-cut stops. Chamfered upper-floor beam without stops. The cottage was stripped for repair when inspected in 1985 and it was clear that the projecting front section was a later addition; the partition wall with No. 2 is thin and there is no division at all at roof level. No. 2 has heavy upper floor joists running from front to back. The left- hand second storey room has a side-pegged jointed-cruck truss, covered with plaster. There are some good C19 plank doors, 1 having a wooden bolt. Interior of No. 3 not inspected, but it is reported to have a stud-and-panel screen in the ground storey, dividing it from No. 2; also a large open fireplace with bread oven. The building is the best preserved in Liverton, retaining its C19 character almost intact. No. 2 is similarly well preserved inside, retaining many of its old plaster wall and ceiling surfaces.
Listing NGR: SX8046275156.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV282617List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1986. Ilsington. Historic Houses Register. Unknown. 74.
SDV336179Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1880-1899. First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map. First Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Map (Digital).
SDV360652Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2018. MasterMap 2018. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital. [Mapped feature: #89408 ]
SDV360653National Heritage List for England: Historic England. 2018. National Heritage List for England. Historic Houses Register. Digital.

Associated Monuments

MDV37240Related to: Liverton Farmhouse and Liverton Farm Cottage (Building)
MDV37242Related to: Old Leys Cottage, Liverton (Building)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:May 8 2018 3:02PM