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HER Number:MDV38440
Name:Barn, byre and linhays at Lower Wotton, Colebrooke

Summary

Barn, byre and linhays. 16th century and 17th century, linhays given new roof structures in 19th century.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 761 980
Map Sheet:SX79NE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishColebrooke
DistrictMid Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishCOLEBROOKE

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX79NE/56/1
  • Old Listed Building Ref (II): 96589

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • BARN (Built, XV to XVII - 1500 AD to 1699 AD (Between))
  • LINHAY (Built, XVI to XVII - 1501 AD to 1699 AD (Between))

Full description

Department of Environment, 1986, Colebrooke, 49 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV344581.

Barn and linhays approximately 10 metres west of Lower Wotton farmhouse. Barn, byre and linhays. 16th century and 17th century, linhays given new roof structures in 19th century. Cob on rubble footings, occasionally patched with 20th century brick; corrugated iron roofs.
L-shaped range of farm buildings. The main range faces south-east and comprises a 16th century barn with byre and hayloft added to right and range extended further right (north-east) by 17th century linhay. Another 17th century linhay added at right angles to left (south-west) end of barn facing north-east on to farmyard.
Barn has original oak shoulder-headed central front door which contains an ancient plank door hung on strap hinges (one with fleur-de-lys finial). The opposing rear doorway is much larger and though it has been partly rebuilt with brick it contains an oak frame with chamfered surround, possibly original. Each gable end has narrow ventilators some containing square-section oak frames. Loading hatch to right on front.
Three-bay roof includes a 16th century side-pegged jointed cruck truss on the left and a 17th century replacement, a-frame truss with pegged dovetail lap-jointed collar to right. The front principal of the later truss is set on a post buried in the wall face. The byre alongside has a ground floor doorway and first floor loading hatch. Its roof timbers were replaced in 19th century. The linhay adjoining the byre is an unusual double-fronted variety. An axial cob wall separates front and back stalls but only stands to first floor level leaving the tallet open. It is 4 bays (Alcock's type t1) with full height posts of large scantling and the crossbeams are tusk-tenoned to the posts. The roof trusses are 19th century a-frame replacements with lap-jointed collars fixed with iron nails and wooden pegs. The linhay on the front of the barn is single-fronted but of similar construction, and of timbers of similarly large scantling. It is 6 bays (Alcock's type t1) but its roof was replaced earlier in 19th century with pegged tie-and-collar-beam trusses. Both linhay roofs are hipped at the end.


Jones, P., 2012, Lower Wotton Farm, Yeoford, Colebrooke, Devon: Results of Historic Building Recording (Report - Survey). SDV349815.

An historic building record of a linhay was made in September 2011 prior to its conversion into ancillary accommodation. The barn was probably constructed in the early 18th century. The building has an unusual design with two open fronts – one onto the farmyard, the other onto a rear access track. Several reused timbers from the medieval farmhouse have been incorporated into the building. In the 18th century one bay was divided to form a stall, possibly a calf house, whilst a piggery was added to the end of the barn in the early 19th century.
The linhay is an addition to the farmyard, and adjoins an earlier byre. It measures 10.3 by 4.5 metres, and is divided into four bays by timber posts. A piggery has been added to its north-east elevation . The building has an unusual design, being double fronted with open elevations facing both the farmyard to the south and an access track to the north. The ground-floor stalls are divided by an axial yellow cob wall laid on a stone footing; the tallet above is fully open. A wide opening has been inserted into one of the central bays. Here the cob has been refaced with bricks, and two large timbers inserted as a doorframe that also support the first-floor beams. Both timbers have four sockets on their inside faces and two sockets on their south faces. These may relate to an earlier use,
although it is possible that the sockets facing the doorway could have held wooden bars blocking the opening. Tethering chains are attached to the posts, as is a wooden bar, probably associated with a door latch. Elsewhere, the cob has been partially refaced using red bricks that abut the earlier bricks of the inserted opening. The 20th-century concrete floor had been removed from the barn, and no evidence for earlier stone or cobbled surfaces was visible.
The roof and first-floor beams are supported on rows of three vertical posts, five of which are reused. Three types of timbers are present. Type A is a jetty bressumer. Type B posts are beams from a first-floor structure. Three of these beams were noted in the linhay. Type C is a plain rectangular timber with series of widely-spaced stave holes (presumably for a wattle and daub partition) in one side. It may have formed the head or cill of a screen. Attached to these posts are pintles and a timber latch hook, all associated with former doorways into the linhay.
The first floor – consisting of wide wooden planks – is supported on a substantial timber superstructure. Large beams set into the central cob wall are attached to the vertical posts by long tongues fixed using single wooden pegs. The undersides of some of the tongues are curved. These beams support floor joists that overlap on top of the beams. Further joists have been laid outside the posts on top of
the tongues. The first floor is almost entirely open on the long axis allowing access for storage from both sides. One bay has been infilled using corrugated iron sheets.
The roof trusses are 19th-century A-frame replacements with lap-jointed collars fixed with iron nails and wooden pegs. The feet of the trusses sit in large sockets in the top of the vertical posts. The corrugated iron roof is supported on rows of three back purlins. The gable openings are boarded up with vertical planks.
The piggery is a single-storey addition with a pitched roof. It is largely covered by modern plaster, but large rubble stonework, along with a cill beam on the south elevation, is visible below. This beam also appears to have been reused since what appear to be sockets are filled with plaster. Although the building is shown on the 1905 Ordnance Survey 1:2500 map and is probably also depicted on the 1888 Ordnance Survey map, the character of the masonry, in conjunction with the fresh state of the plaster above, probably indicates the building has been restored in the recent past. The east
elevation incorporates three plank doors, each with different strap hinges. Against this wall an early surface of pitched rectangular slate cobbles survives. This building has a modern corrugated iron sheet roof.
The plan form of the barn is unusual. Most linhays have a single open front, and whilst double-fronted linhays are known, they rarely appear in the literature on farm buildings. Alcock , for example, refers to an unlofted doublefronted linhay on Braunton Marshes, and a fully open and lofted deer barn or shelter has been recorded on the Stevenstone Estate near Great Torrington.
The date of the linhay is unclear. It is attached to a byre of probable 16th-century date, and the listed building description puts forward a 17th century date for its construction. The lack of evidence for early diagnostic dating features would indicate a date from the late 17th century onwards, although an early 18th century date seems most likely.


Gaimster, M., 2012, Post-Medieval Fieldwork in Britain and Northern Ireland in 2011 (Article in Serial). SDV361576.

COLEBROOK, LOWER WOOTON FARM (SX76199 98097). P. Jones (AC Archaeology) recorded a probable 18th-century linhay. The building has an unusual design with two open fronts — one onto the farmyard, the other onto a rear access track. Several reused timbers from the medieval farmhouse have been incorporated into the building. In the 18th century one bay was divided to form a stall, possibly a calf house, while a piggery was added to the end of the barn in the early 19th century.


English Heritage, 2015, National Heritage List for England (National Heritage List for England). SDV357602.

Barn, byre and linhays. C16 and C17, linhays given new roof structures in C19. Cob on rubble footings, occasionally patched with C20 brick; corrugated iron roofs. L-shaped range of farmbuildings. The main range faces south-east and comprises a C16 barn with byre and hayloft added to right and range extended further right (north-east) by C17 linhay. Another C17 linhay added at right angles to left (south-west) end of barn facing north-east on to farmyard. Barn has original oak shoulder-headed central front door which contains an ancient plank door hung on strap hinges (one with fleur-de-lys final). The opposing rear doorway is much larger and though it has been partly rebuilt with brick it contains an oak frame with chamfered surround, possibly original. Each gable end has narrow ventilators some containing square-section oak frames. Loading hatch to right on front. 3-bay roof includes a C16 side-pegged jointed cruck truss on the left and a C17 replacement, A-frame truss with pegged dovetail lap-jointed collar to right. The front principal of the later truss is set on a post buried in the wall face. The byre alongside has a ground floor doorway and first floor loading hatch. Its roof timbers were replaced in C19. The linhay adjoining the byre is an unusual double-fronted variety. An axial cob wall separates front and back stalls but only stands to first floor level leaving the tallet open. It is 4 bays (Alcock's Type T1) with full height posts of large scantling and the crossbeams are tusk-tenoned to the posts. The roof trusses are C19 A-frame replacements with lap-jointed collars fixed with iron nails and wooden pegs. The linhay on the front of the barn is single-fronted but of similar construction, and of timbers of similarly large scantling. It is 6 bays (Alcock's Type T1) but its roof was replaced earlier in Cl9 with pegged tie-and-collar-bean trusses. Both linhay roofs are hipped at the end.


Ordnance Survey, 2018, MasterMap 2018 (Cartographic). SDV360652.

Buildings depicted on the modern mapping.


Historic England, 2018, National Heritage List for England (National Heritage List for England). SDV360653.

COLEBROOK SX 79 NE 5/77 Barn and linhays approximately - 10m west of Lower Wotton Farmhouse - GV II
Barn, byre and linhays. C16 and C17, linhays given new roof structures in C19. Cob on rubble footings, occasionally patched with C20 brick; corrugated iron roofs.
L-shaped range of farmbuildings. The main range faces south-east and comprises a C16 barn with byre and hayloft added to right and range extended further right (north-east) by C17 linhay. Another C17 linhay added at right angles to left (south-west) end of barn facing north-east on to farmyard. Barn has original oak shoulder-headed central front door which contains an ancient plank door hung on strap hinges (one with fleur-de-lys final). The opposing rear doorway is much larger and though it has been partly rebuilt with brick it contains an oak frame with chamfered surround, possibly original. Each gable end has narrow ventilators some containing square-section oak frames. Loading hatch to right on front. 3-bay roof includes a C16 side-pegged jointed cruck truss on the left and a C17 replacement, A-frame truss with pegged dovetail lap-jointed collar to right. The front principal of the later truss is set on a post buried in the wall face. The byre alongside has a ground floor doorway and first floor loading hatch. Its roof timbers were replaced in C19. The linhay adjoining the byre is an unusual double-fronted variety. An axial cob wall separates front and back stalls but only stands to first floor level leaving the tallet open. It is 4 bays (Alcock's Type T1) with full height posts of large scantling and the crossbeams are tusk-tenoned to the posts.
The roof trusses are C19 A-frame replacements with lap-jointed collars fixed with iron nails and wooden pegs. The linhay on the front of the barn is single-fronted but of similar construction, and of timbers of similarly large scantling. It is 6 bays (Alcock's Type T1) but its roof was replaced earlier in Cl9 with pegged tie-and-collar-bean trusses. Both linhay roofs are hipped at the end.
Listing NGR: SX7619498083.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV344581List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1986. Colebrooke. Historic Houses Register. A4 Comb Bound. 49.
SDV349815Report - Survey: Jones, P.. 2012. Lower Wotton Farm, Yeoford, Colebrooke, Devon: Results of Historic Building Recording. AC Archaeology Report. ACD366/2/0. A4 Bound + Digital.
SDV357602National Heritage List for England: English Heritage. 2015. National Heritage List for England. Historic Houses Register. Digital.
SDV360652Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2018. MasterMap 2018. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital. [Mapped feature: #112455 ]
SDV360653National Heritage List for England: Historic England. 2018. National Heritage List for England. Historic Houses Register. Digital.
SDV361576Article in Serial: Gaimster, M.. 2012. Post-Medieval Fieldwork in Britain and Northern Ireland in 2011. Post-Medieval Archaeology. 46. Unknown.

Associated Monuments

MDV38439Related to: Lower Wotton Farmhouse (Building)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV5900 - Historic Building Recording at Lower Wotton Farm, Yeoford, Colebrooke, Devon

Date Last Edited:Jul 19 2018 12:30PM