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HER Number:MDV3857
Name:SHRUNKEN VILLAGE in the Parish of Lamerton

Summary

Chaddlehanger. Shrunken village in the parish of Lamerton.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 465 778
Map Sheet:SX47NE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishLamerton
DistrictWest Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishLAMERTON

Protected Status: none recorded

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX47NE/23

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • SHRUNKEN VILLAGE (Early Medieval to XXI - 1066 AD to 2009 AD (Between))

Full description

Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV239212.

Worksheet 27/10/1976.


Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV239213.

Des=oral information from r. Prince,west combe,n. Bovey.


Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV239214.

Des=oral information from mr. Cole,chaddlehanger,lamerton.


Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV239215.

Des=letter from n. V. Quinnell(26/12/1983)in parish file.


Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV239216.

Des=survey drawing 1:1250(1983)in parish file.


Untitled Source (Aerial Photograph). SDV239217.

Aph=raf/cpe/uk/2149/3362-3(11/6/1947)/dcc 40/139-140.


Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV239218.

Gover, j. E. B. + mawer, a. + stenton, f. M. /the place-names of devon/(1931)185.


Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV239220.

Des=keystone historic buildings consultants/(-/6/1990)/4,11-18/disused longhouse at lower chaddlehanger, lamerton, devon.


Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV239221.

Des=greeves, t. /devonshire association annual meeting 1999: archaeological sites north of tavistock/(1996)/copy in brentor pf.


Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, Untitled Source (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV24.

Vis=15/12/1983 (os) chaddlehanger (formerly churthanger); suffered village shrinkage, including the removal of field boundaries. A group of 5 rectilinear platforms or part platforms centred at sx465-778-, are adjacent to, or east of a streamlet which follows the valley bottom. All are cut into the relevant slopes to an average depth of 0.5m, and 4 can be related to structures on the 1842 tithe map, 2 of them are cottages. The fifth, at sx46507779 is beside a barn and may have been a penning. A second group of 5 platforms centred at sx464-779- have no corresponding features on the tithe map and may indicate buildings demolished before 1842. The platforms vary in overall measurements from 10m x 10m x 16m. One at the sw is cut by one of two leats. The leats now appear as terraces. Mr cole thinks that they were constructed in 1899 to promote spring grass for cattle and lamb fattening, and went out of use in the 1930's. Fed by a spring, both leats extended into other fields to the w, being culverted beneath roads. Both also cut through two east to west field banks, one depicted in 1842; these are now visible as very low spread banks, barely 0.3m high. Condition fair, all earthworks remarkably smoothed considering late date and under permanent pasture (os).


LETTER, Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV35728.

Vis=-/12/1983 (quinnell + fletcher) earthworks of abandoned settlement including at least two silted up leats (dated to 1899 by the occupant for irrigation) and terraces or platforms. Only four of the platforms, at the north of the site, appear to be deserted prior to 1842, since they do not show on the tithe map. Survey drawn at 1:1250 (letter).


Keystone Historic Buildings Consultants, Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV41615.

Chaddlehanger. A small scattered hamlet presently consisting of 4 farmsteads. See keystone report for documentary history (keystone).


Greeves, T. A. P., Untitled Source (Worksheet). SDV69961.

In 1851 there were 58 people living in the hamlet of chaddlehanger including 37 children. The population in 1996 was 14 (greeves).


Griffith, F. M., Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV8774.

Features clearly visible on 1947 rap aps, which however add nothing to quinnell's survey (fmg).


Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV1142.

Chaddlehanger. In conversation with richard prince of west combe, north bovey, tom greeves was told that mr. Cole, the farmer of chaddlehanger, had noticed a number of buildings showing up in the fields round chaddlehanger this summer owing to the drought. Mr. Cole, who is an old man, had never seen these buildings before and had never heard anything about them. Ngr only approx. Deserted settlement at chaddlehanger, tentatively equated with the above (worksheet).


Gover, J. E. B. + Mawer, A. + Stenton, F. M., 1931, The Place-Names of Devon: Part One (Monograph). SDV1312.

'cheldesangre' first recorded 1238 (mawer et al).


Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, 1983, SX47NE20 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV239219.

Chaddlehanger. The hamlet of Chaddlehanger occupies the head of a south west facing re-entrant with moderately steep sides, well watered by springs. Village shrinkage, including removal of field boundaries occupies about 2 hectares at Chaddlehanger, mostly in the narrow bottom and the north west side of the valley.
A group of five rectilinear platforms or part platforms are adjacent to or east of a streamlet which follows the valley bottom. All are cut into the relevant slopes to an average depth of 0.5m and four can be related to structure on the 1842 map, two of them cottages. The fifth, is beside a barn and may have been a penning. A second group of five platforms have no corresponding features on the Tithe map and may indicate buildings demolished before 1842. The platforms, square and rectilinear, vary in overall measurements. One at the south west is cut by two leats.
The two leats now appear as terraces. Resident says they were constructed in 1899, to promote the growth of spring grass for cattle and lamb fattening, and went out of use in the 1930s. Fed by a spring both leats extended into other fields to the west being culverted beneath roads. Both also cut through two east to west field banks, one depicted in 1842, these are now visible as low banks.
The desertion of Chaddlehanger is for the most part minor archaeological significance but is interesting in that the surface remains give no indication of their comparatively recent date.
Condition fair. All earthworks remarkably smooth considering their late date and that they are in permanent pasture. No finds made. 15/12/1983.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV1142Migrated Record:
SDV1312Monograph: Gover, J. E. B. + Mawer, A. + Stenton, F. M.. 1931. The Place-Names of Devon: Part One. The Place-Names of Devon: Part One. VIII. A5 Hardback.
SDV239212Migrated Record:
SDV239213Migrated Record:
SDV239214Migrated Record:
SDV239215Migrated Record:
SDV239216Migrated Record:
SDV239217Aerial Photograph:
SDV239218Migrated Record:
SDV239219Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. 1983. SX47NE20. OSAD Card. Card Index + Digital.
SDV239220Migrated Record:
SDV239221Migrated Record:
SDV24Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
SDV35728Migrated Record: LETTER.
SDV41615Migrated Record: Keystone Historic Buildings Consultants.
SDV69961Worksheet: Greeves, T. A. P..
SDV8774Migrated Record: Griffith, F. M..

Associated Monuments

MDV114322Related to: Field System at Lower Chaddlewood (Monument)
MDV35629Related to: Longhouse, Chaddlehangar (Building)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:Jul 26 2018 12:38PM