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HER Number:MDV3919
Name:Tavistock Abbey

Summary

Tavistock Abbey was an abbey of the Benedictine Order protected by a precinct wall, and was in occupation from AD974 until the dissolution in 1539. Significant remains of the Abbey Church are known from their remains revealed in excavation whilst standing remains also exist in the form of a number of ruined or adapted structures many of which are listed buildings.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 481 743
Map Sheet:SX47SE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishTavistock
DistrictWest Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishTAVISTOCK

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • National Monuments Record: 437967
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX47SE/1
  • Old SAM County Ref: 96
  • Old SAM Ref: 29679
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division: SX47SE4

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • ABBEY (X to Late Medieval - 950 AD to 1539 AD (Between))

Full description

National Monuments Record, SX4774 (Aerial Photograph). SDV256397.

Kingdon, E. V., Untitled Source (Monograph). SDV259004.

Swete, R. J. (Revd), 1792-1801, 564M 'Picturesque Sketches of Devon' by Reverend John Swete, 4/160,163,16/75,13/3 (Record Office Collection). SDV337942.

Appleton, E., 1866, Archaeological Notes on Tavistock and Neighbourhood, Part 5, 122-126 (Article in Serial). SDV256410.

Birch, W de G., 1872, On Three Lists of Monasteries Compiled in the Thirteenth Century, 45-64 (Article in Serial). SDV256356.

The abbey appears as Tauestoke, Sancti Mariae, on a list of monasteries compiled in the 13th century.

Worth, R. N., 1875, The Economic Geology of Devon, 215 (Article in Serial). SDV256360.

Built of a loose-textured, free-working trappen ash from Hardwick, about a mile from the town.

Kerslake, T., 1877, Traces of the Ancient Kingdom of Dumnonia outside Cornwall, 416 (Article in Serial). SDV5885.

The original Celtic Sanctuary onto which Tavistock Abbey was engrafted was dedicated to St. Rumon, and this was his shrine or burial place.

Reichel, O. J., 1898, The Domesday Churches of Devon, 291, 292, 310 (Article in Serial). SDV863.

The Abbey Church is cited as one of the few churches known to be in existence at the time of the Domesday Survey.

Chanter, J. F., 1910, Christianity in Devon before AD 909, 492 (Article in Serial). SDV870.

Radford, G. H., 1914, Tavistock Abbey, 123-6, 143-6, 149 (Article in Serial). SDV256400.

Reichel, O. J., 1914, The Hundred of Tavistock in Early Times, 220-237 (Article in Serial). SDV8646.

Ministry of Works, 1924, Tavistock Abbey Ruins (Schedule Document). SDV344377.

Tavistock Abbey Ruins, the remains of a Benedictine Abbey standing in the Vicarage garden consisting of:
A 15th century entrance gateway with two flanking towers. The vaulted roofing of the ground floor remains but above this only the walls are standing. Locally known as Betsy Grimble's Tower.
A small tower standing on the Precincts Wall. It has been repaired and reroofed for use as a summerhouse. It is locally known as the Still House and is perhaps a part of the Infirmary buildings. From here the Precincts Wall runs for a considerable distance east and west along the bank of the River Tavy, for part of this distance the old walk along the top of the wall is well preserved.

R. B. M., 1924 - 1925, John Chubbe, Abbot of Tavistock, 130-132 (Article in Serial). SDV256419.

R. B. M. Refers briefly to aspects of the history of the abbey through various abbots.

Reed, H., 1927, Architectural Notes on Some Churches Visited During the Congress., 166-168 (Article in Serial). SDV256355.

The Great Benedictine Abbey of Tavistock stood immediately south but extending east and west of the parish church. It was founded about AD 973 by Ordulph, brother-in-law of King Edgar. Foundation Charter granted by King Ethelred II AD 981 and witnessed by others by Elfrida, the Queen Mother. It was burnt by the Danes AD 997 and raised again by Ordulph and his monks. Abbot Alfred, AD 1027, when later Archbishop of York crowned William the Conqueror. At the dissolution the abbey was surrendered into the King's hands by Abbot John Peryn, 3rd March 1539. All that remains of the abbey church is the angle of a wall which has a recess framed by an early English arch in the south side of the north wall. In the west wall is a small archway. The remains of the abbots lodging known locally as Betty Grimbal's Tower is principally 15th Century work and stands in the vicarage grounds. Most of the walls were levelled at the dissolution. Buildings for which no use could be found were unroofed and ruinous. Only the gatehouse, the Saxon school (used as a granary) the walls of the kitchen and chapter house were uncovered at the top; the refectory was fitted up as a meeting house for the Presbyterians. About 1720 the building now known as the Bedford Hotel, was erected by Jacob Saunders from the stone of the chapter house. The survey of 1726 deals with the abbey site, listing the buildings then in use, including houses, stables, poundhouse and pound, Malt Kiln House and Mill House. In 1927 Harbottle Reed described the foundation, history and architecture of Tavistock Abbey. Very little of the abbey survived into modern times.

Reed, H., 1927, Proceedings of the Congress of the British Archaeological Association at Exeter, 21-22 (Article in Serial). SDV249288.

R. B. M., 1928 - 1929, John Dynyngton, Abbot of Tavistock, 147-148 (Article in Serial). SDV256420.

Radford, 1929, Tavistock Abbey (Article in Serial). SDV256454.

Masterman, J. H. B., 1931, Address of the President: The Monasteries of Devon, 67-68 (Article in Serial). SDV136066.

Ordulf is named as founder in the Charter of King Ethelred II, 981. He brought the remains of St. Rumon from Cornwall to be enshrined in the abbey.

Thompson, G. S., 1932 - 1933, Exeter and the Russell Earls of Bedford, 13 (Article in Serial). SDV256366.

In 1539 Lord John Russell received the site and buildings of the dissolved abbey together with its manors.

Radford, E. L., 1932 - 1933, The Buildings of Tavistock Abbey after the Dissolution, 195-203 (Article in Serial). SDV249296.

The Abbey Church and cloisters were destroyed soon after the dissolution in 1539. The Frater and Dorter were retained, and the Abbots Hall used as the dwelling house. Some time after 1716 a new house was built, at the same time destroying much of what remained of the abbey buildings. In the 19th century the building of the new road involved the dumping of soil in the churchyard.

Rose-Troup, D., 1936 - 1937, Cartularies of Religious Houses in Devon, 142-144 (Article in Serial). SDV256423.

The cartulary of Tavistock Abbey was formerly in the hands of the Dukes of Bedford but its present whereabouts is not known.

Rose-Troup, F., 1936 - 1937, Lead from the Dissolved Religious Houses in Devon in 1549, 122-126 (Article in Serial). SDV7422.

Lead taken from Tavistock Abbey in 1549 is included in a contemporary account of lead taken from Devon's dissolved religious houses.

Alexander, J. J., 1936 - 1937, St. Rumon, 345-350 (Article in Serial). SDV256364.

Anonymous, 1937, Proceedings of the 76th annual meeting, 14 (Article in Serial). SDV256417.

Alexander, J. J., 1937, Tavistock in the 15th century, 247-285 (Article in Serial). SDV322349.

Alexander examines the exploits of each abbot in the 15th century, examining the documentary sources of the period in great detail and assessing their impact on the town of Tavistock as well.

Alexander, J. J., 1942, The Beginnings of Tavistock, 185-193 (Article in Serial). SDV256363.

Probable foundation date about 973. Royal Charter granted in 981. An account of the history of the abbey.

Finberg, H. P. R., 1942 - 1946, A Vice-Archdeacon's Legacies, 285-287 (Article in Serial). SDV256430.

Indenture of agreement of about 1190 detailing disposal of property, some of which went to the abbey.

Finberg, H. P. R., 1942 - 1946, Abbots of Tavistock, 159-162, 174-175, 186-188, 194-197 (Article in Serial). SDV256427.

Biographical notes given for the Abbots of Tavistock from 975-1539.

Alexander, J. J., 1942 - 1946, Sihtric, Fourth Abbot of Tavistock, 101 (Article in Serial). SDV256371.

Query about the date of the succession of Sihtric to the Abbacy, died 1082.

Karslake, E. K. H., 1942 - 1946, St. Rumon, 281-285 (Article in Serial). SDV256373.

Some history but more speculation concerning St. Rumon.

Finberg, H. P. R., 1942 - 1946, St. Rumon, 331-332 (Article in Serial). SDV256429.

Finberg dismisses much of Karslake's speculation about St. Rumon. His relics, removed from Glastonbury, were housed in a shrine in the abbey set up in about 980. Shrine still extant in early 12th century.

Finberg, H. P. R., 1942 - 1946, The Cartulary of Tavistock, 55-61 (Article in Serial). SDV256425.

Cartulary apparently written in 13th century deals with the early history of the abbey from its foundation by Ordulf. History and endowments of the abbey.

Finberg, H. P. R., 1942 - 1946, The Tragi-Comedy of Abbot Bonus, 341-347 (Article in Serial). SDV256431.

History of a dispute over the succession to the Abbacy and an unfortunate papal appointment as Abbot.

Hicks, C. E., 1947, Tavistock: The Changing Scene in the Last Two Centuries, 155-8; plates 10-13. (Article in Serial). SDV256401.

Finberg, H. P. R., 1947 - 1949, A Cellarer's Account-Book, 253-255 (Article in Serial). SDV256432.

An account book recording the cellarer's expenditure during 43 weeks in 1536- 1537 is examined and partially reproduced.

Hicks, H. R., 1947 - 1949, Ministers of the Abbey Chapel, Tavistock, 212-215 (Article in Serial). SDV256436.

Finberg, H. P. R., 1947 - 1949, Prelude to Abbot Bonus, 184-187 (Article in Serial). SDV256434.

The disputed appointment to the Abbacy in 1325 is documented.

Hicks, H. R., 1947 - 1949, Tavistock Water Gate, 119 (Article in Serial). SDV256433.

Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, 1948 - 1950, SX47SE4 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV256398.

Remains of Tavistock Abbey.
The great Benedictine Abbey of Tavistock stood immediately south but extending east and west of the parish church. It was founded about the year 973 by Ordulph, brother in law of King Edgar. The Foundation Charter was granted by King Ethelred II in 981. Burnt by the Danes in 997, it was raised again by Ordulph and his monks. Abbot Aldred (1027), when later Archbishop of York, crowned William the Conqueror. Finally at the Dissolution it was surrendered into the King's Lands by the Abbot, John P(?) 3rd March 1539.

Early English Arch. Part of the north wall of the Abbey Cloisters, traditionally known as Ordulph's Tunnels (?). Examination on the north side of this arch in 1914 disclosed decoration of date circa 1240.

Remain of the Abbot's Lodging (known locally as Betsy Grimbal's Tower). This building principally 15th century work, extended nearly to the pavement of what is now Plymouth Road. It opened on to the Abbot's Garden and fish ponds. Ref to leaflet - Guide to Tavistock Abbey Remains by Kingdon.

All that remains of the Abbey Church in the angle of a wall which has a recess formed by an Early English arch on the south side of the north wall. This wall is 8 metres long and 2.2 metres high. The west wall, which forms the angle with the north wall, is about 9 metres long with a break of 3 metres in it. Height of the main part is 2.2 metres. There is also a small archway in the wall, butting onto the angle which is 1.5 metres wide. Condition of whole fairly good.

Remains of Abbots Lodging. This building which stands in the vicarage grounds, is in a ruinous state. The eastern opening of the gateway which originally passed through it, has been blocked, Condition fairly good. Site visit - 10/07/1950.

Department of Environment, 1950, Tavistock UD, 2 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV256437.

Finberg, H. P. R., 1951, Untitled Source (Unknown). SDV256408.

Pevsner, N., 1952, The Buildings of England: South Devon, 277-278 (Monograph). SDV336217.

Tavistock was one of the two most powerful monastic houses in Devon. It was for Benedictine Monks. Just enough of the buildings remain for one to visualise their extent. The earliest masonry dates from the 12th Century.

Hoskins, W. G., 1954, A New Survey of England: Devon, 485, 487-488 (Monograph). SDV17562.

The abbey became the largest and wealthiest in the south-west. Hoskins summarises visible remains and describes how the site can be visually reconstructed.

Woolner, D. H., 1965 - 1967, Tavistock Abbey Church, 7-10 (Article in Serial). SDV256438.

Description of the results of the excavation of a water main across Bedford Square given. Great quantities of human bones were found on reaching the area of the choir of the Abbey Church yet no stratigraphy survived. When the trench crossed the area of the south wall of the choir quantities of stone, plaster and mortar were found, but the wall was already cut through. Dr. Radford's plan was confirmed but no monks cemetery was found. Finds of tiles discussed.

Finberg, H. P. R., 1969, Tavistock Abbey: A Study in the Social and Economic History in Devon (Monograph). SDV256440.

Knowles, D. + Hadcock, R. N., 1971, Medieval Religious Houses: England and Wales, 57, 77 (Monograph). SDV323253.

Tavistock Abbey. Benedictine (Black) Monks. The Abbey of St. Mary and St. Rumon was begun by Ealdorman Ordgar (died 971) father-in-law of King Edgar and completed by his son Ordulf 975-980. It was burnt down by the Danes in 997. But soon restored. Fourteen monks are recorded there in 1377. It became a mitred abbey in 1458, and was surrendered by an Abbot and twenty monks in 1539. Dependencies were Cowick, Denbury and Scilly.

Radford, C. A. R., 1975, The Pre-Conquest Church and the Old Minsters in Devon, 2-11 (Article in Serial). SDV256441.

Timms, S. C., 1976, The Devon Urban Survey, 1976. First Draft, 165, 169, 173, 179 (Report - Survey). SDV341346.

the Benedictine Abbey of Our Lady and St. Rumon was founded under royal patronage in the late 10th century; it received its charter in AD981. Its subsequent sacking by the Danes in AD991 appears to have been a short-term setback. The abbey directed the medieval growth of the town until the dissolution. After the dissolution the buildings were adapted to secular use and today few medieval features are visible. Despite the radical 19th century improvements to the town by the Dukes of Bedford and the physical dissolution of the abbey precinct, the archaeological significance of Tavistock nevertheless resides in the medieval abbey and its relationship to the town that grew up beside it. Excavations in the parish church yard have shown that the present road level is as much as two metres higher than that of the medieval period and Timms comments that if even half of this is represents a typical depth of build up then a rich quantity of archaeological information will have been preserved.

Pearce, S. M., 1982, Church and Society in South Devon, AD 350-700, 3-4 (Article in Serial). SDV336077.

Founded in 981. The Manor of Tavistock (the most important element in the abbey's endowment) was identical with the ecclesiastical parish (citing Finberg). Aethelred's Charter hints that the Benedictines succeeded to an earlier minster church (citing Radford). The place name 'Stoc' may bear this out. The site of the earlier minster church may be that now occupied by St Eustachius parish church, and that the new abbey church and domestic buildings were erected a short distance away. Inscribed memorial stone of 5th - 6th century found in close proximity may suggest that the estate of 981, and its predecessor, was essentially that of the landholders who set up the stone circa 500AD.

Department of Environment, 1983, Tavistock, 2 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV272550.

Griffith, F. M., 1986, DAP/HO, 5-10 (Aerial Photograph). SDV256450.

Jones, G., 1986, Holy Wells and the Cult of St. Helen, 69 (Article in Serial). SDV7180.

Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J., 1991, Archaeological Assessment of Four Areas of Land Adjoining the River Tavy and Plymouth Road, Tavistock, 1-7 (Report - Assessment). SDV256444.

The Tavistock and District Local History Society, 1994, About Tavistock: An Historical Introduction and Six Town Walks, 7-12 (Monograph). SDV354806.

Founded by Ordulph, Earl of Devon. The abbey was dedicated to Our Lady and to Rumon, a 6th century Celtic saint. It survived an attack by the Danes to last for five and a half centuries. At the dissolution in 1539 the last abbot moved to Stone posts in West Street. Much of the masonry from the monastic buildings has been reused in other buildings but some structures survive including three of the four entrancts to the precinct; Betsy Grimbal's Tower, the open porch formed by the tower supports at the western end of the parish church and Court Gate.

Department of National Heritage, 1994, Untitled Source (Correspondence). SDV256383.

Scheduled monument consent granted for works to the court gate; repair of cracked gable wall of masonic hall, reinstatement of first floor classroom ceiling and repairs to library floor.

Department of National Heritage, 1994, Untitled Source (Correspondence). SDV256384.

Scheduled monument consent granted for works concerning replacement of stairwell and cupboard ceiling; lead weathering to string/corbel; renewal of part library ceiling; and removal and subsequent replacement of part of the ceiling in the masonic hall to gain access for repointing of the gable wall.

Department of National Heritage, 1994, Untitled Source (Correspondence). SDV256385.

Scheduled monument consent granted for works concerning repairs to the external envelope of the Court Gate Cottage, and repairs to the ceilings in the upstairs rooms in the property.

Freeman, M. + Wans, J., 1996, Tavistock Abbey: Alternative Interpretations, 17-34 (Article in Serial). SDV249301.

Analysis of the Bedford leases and surveys extends earlier studies by indicating the location of the Great Kitchen, a kitchen to the west of the hall and corrections to the mills. The authors suggest that the Abbot's Hall was formerly the infirmary and that the misericord adjoined it to the west and shifting the location of the Abbot's lodging to the west of the cloister.

Exeter Archaeology, 1997, Archaeological Assessment of Tavistock Sewer Overflows Scheme, 2-3 (Report - Assessment). SDV344347.

The original abbey was completed by 981. It was destroyed by the Danes in 997 but soon rebuilt and became the richest religious house in Devon by the 11th century. The abbey was rebuilt in the early 14th century and again in the late 15th century and in circa 1525 the first printing press in the South West was established at the abbey. The abbey was dissolved in 1539 and most of the land and property were granted to the Russell family, the Dukes of Bedford. In 1540 an Act was passed for rebuilding 'decayed' houses at Tavistock and many of the former abbey structures were probably dismantled in order to reuse the building materials. The abbey church stood in ruins until circa 1670 when it was razed to the ground and the School House built on the approximate site of the western tower. In the early 18th century the merchant J saunders is said to have destroyed much of what remained of the Medieval abbey buildings when he built Abbey House which later became part of the Bedford Hotel. The precise plan of the Medieval abbey is lareley speculative and mainly based on an 18th century plan of Tavistock by John Wynne.

Stead, P. M., 1997 - 1999, Archaeological Investigations in the Vicinity of Tavistock Abbey 1997-1999 (Report - non-specific). SDV338870.

10th century Benedictine abbey of St Mary and St Rumon founded by Ordulf, King Edgar's brother-in-law, where the routes from Okehampton, Plymouth and Cornwall converged. The abbey was destroyed by the Danes in 997 but quickly rebuilt and was probably the richest religious house in Devon by the time of the Domesday survey in 1086. The investigations in 1997 showed that the ground level had risen by up to 2 meters since the medieval period and that extensive well-preserved remains relating to the abbey church survive within Bedford Square. The excavations revealed longitudinal footings for the walls of the choir and aisles to the north and south suggesting a slightly different alignment of the abbey. Three high status monastic graves were exposed, two of which contained chalices and fragments of clothing. The 1999 enhancement scheme exposed a further medieval wall and tiled floor within the east end of the former abbey church.

Blaylock, S. R., 1998, Tavistock Abbey, Devon: Assessment and Recording of the Standing Fabric 1998 (Report - Assessment). SDV256451.

Assessment and building recording. See report for full details.

Salvatore, J. P., 1999, 144445. (Personal Comment). SDV256388.

Stead, P. M., 1999, Archaeological Investigations at Tavistock Abbey 1997-1999, 149-203; figures 1-11 (Article in Serial). SDV336200.

Excavations in 1997 for a sewer trench in 1999 during an enhancement scheme, exposed the east end of the Abbey Church in the south of Bedford Square at SX48177441. Three monastic graves and Medieval tiles were found within the church. To the south of the Abbey Church the sewer trench cut across the site of the Great Court of the Abbey. The Medieval ground level was established at a depth of 1.5 -2 meters and consisted of fine metalling over compacted clay.
Figure 11 shows a conjectural reconstruction of the possible extent of the main ranges of the abbey buildings.

Gaimster, M. + Haith, C. + Bradley, J., 1999, Medieval Britain and Ireland in 1998, 241 (Article in Serial). SDV361737.

Summary of the work carried out by P. M. Stead for South West Water Service Ltd; monitoring and recording of a sewer trench crossing the site of the Benedictine abbey church.

Department of National Heritage, 2000, 10th Amendment of 37th List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV256392.

Mask keystone at Kilworthy House said to come from Tavistock Abbey.

Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2000, Untitled Source (Correspondence). SDV322350.

Scheduled monument consent granted, subject to conditions, for works concerning demolition of abutting garages and re-surfacing of a car park.

Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2001, Tavistock Abbey (Schedule Document). SDV344375.

Tavistock Abbey includes part of the standing, ruined and buried remains which together encompass the greater part of the abbey. It is sited in the centre of the town on the north side of the River Tavy. The abbey of the Benedictine Order was protected by a precinct wall which separated the religious community from those outside and it was in occupation from AD 974 until 1539. The abbey buildings were built of Hurdwick stone mainly of random rubble construction with moulded detail in Roborough stone in the earlier period and Dartmoor granite in the later period. The abbey conformed to a traditional monastic plan in which an abbey church and three ranges of buildings were grouped around a central open cloister. However, at Tavistock the usual Benedictine plan for those buildings outside the claustral range was reversed with the outer court lying to the east rather than the west. Significant remains of the abbey church are known from excavation whilst standing remains also exist in the form of a number of ruined or adapted structures many of which are Grade I or Grade II Listed Buildings. The monastic precinct wall survives over much of its southern and western circuit and the positions of two gateways are known. The greatest building within the abbey would have been its church, the buried remains of whiich have been located to the south of the parish church of St Eustachius and in Bedford Square. Excavations in Bedford Square in 1997 revealed walls of the choir and aisles to the north and south belonging to the east end of the abbey church. Three burials discovered at the time appear to be those of high ranking members of the abbey's religious community; pewter chalices had been placed at the heads of two of the burials. They had been buried within the walls of their abbey church in a privileged position close to the altar. To the west of Bedford Square, an excavation in 1920 in St Eustachius's graveyard established the location of a wall interpreted as the north wall of the nave; a small inscribed stone marks its position. About 11 metres to its south is a small part of the south wall of the nave and part of the inner wall of the west claustral range which survives as Grade I Listed standing masonry remains. From these fragmentary remains and from William of Worcester's measurements of 1478, the abbey church can be estimated to have been 67 metres in length although observations in 1999 suggest that the east end of the church was extended at some time during its life prior to the Dissolution of 1539. The nave of the church would have been about 11 metres wide providing the north range of a claustral suite which would have enclosed a cloister garden perhaps 25 metres square. Opposite St Eustachius's graveyard, on the south side of Plymouth Street, lies the Bedford Hotel which occupies the position once filled by the south range of cloisters. Immediately behind it, to its south, is a Grade II Listed Building which is considered to be the monastic infirmary hall or possibly the Abbot's hall (it is now commonly known as the Abbey Chapel). The structure has the character of a large Medieval open hall and it was entered from the north by a two storied porch; the building has been in use as a non-conformist chapel since the 17th century. The porch tower (Abbey Porch) of two stories, which is a Grade I Listed Building, was added to the north façade of Abbey Chapel in the late 15th or early16th century. The entrance of the porch was on the north side and its outer arch is fitted with a massive granite frame which was infilled with rubble in the 19th century. Elsewhere, studies undertaken in 1998 have demonstrated that the four walls of the rectangular Trowtes's House (a Grade II Listed Building lying just inside the suspected location of the east precinct wall) retains extensive Medieval walling and external features. Small below ground sections of walling identified with the positions of what appear to have been the Chapter House and the reredorter (latrine block) of the abbey have also been located in 1929 and 1998 respectively, while in 1996 the position of the monastic Great Kitchen was identified in documentary evidence, lying to the south-east of the abbey church.
Two gateways of the abbey survive. The most easterly gateway, and probably the main entrance to the abbey, is known as Court Gate (also as Higher Gate or Town Gate); it is a Grade I Listed Building. A study of the two storey gatehouse in 1993 identified five structural phases beginning in the late 12th century, although it is considered thet the 12th century gatehouse is encased in a later structure and the first floor of the building is considered to belong to the later Medieval and later phases. The building was restored in 1824 when additions were made to its east and west walls. The West Gate, a Grade I Listed Building (known more commonly as Betsy Grimbal's Tower), was the west gate of the Abbey precinct. It comprises an entrance archway flanked by projecting demi-octagonal stair turrets; there is a first floor room over the gate passage, and a two storied structure of continuous construction to the north.
A significant section of the monastic wall survives whilst elsewhere its course can be predicted with reasonable confidence. North of Betsy Grimbal's Tower it lies beneath Plymouth Road whilst a long stretch to its south, where it borders The Vicarage, appears to have been repalced by a Post Medieval wall on a slightly different alignment. However, an appropriate 26 metre length of precinct wall on its lower western side survives up to wall walk level, and over 85 metres of the southern precinct wall which flanks the River Tavy is considered to be largely Medieval although rebuilt in places; the southern stretch of wall is Grade II Listed. Where it survives the precinct wall is 1 metre thick, of Hurdwick stone, and has a pseudo-defensive character of a Late Medieval monastic boundary wall with a string course and a crenellated parapet (partly rebuilt in the 19th century) fronting a wall walk 3.2 metres above ground level. At the junction of the south and west precinct walls in the extreme south-west corner is a small square, two storied tower known as the Still Tower or Still House which is a Grade II Listed Building. It is about 6 metres high and 4.8 metres square, built of Hurdwick stone, shillet and some granite, with a crenellated parapet. Although it may be pre-15th century, the use of granite in an original doorway suggests the probability of a later date. The tower was converted into a summerhouse or gazebo in the late 19th century and some of its features are of this date.
Tavistock Abbey has a well known and recorded history. It was founded in AD 974, probably at the instigation of the Saxon King Edgar (959-75), by Ordulf, Earl of Devon, who granted the manor of Tavistock to the Benedictine Order. The abbey was dedicated to st Mary and St Rumon and in 981 received its foundation charter from King Ethelre (979-1016). In 997 the abbey was destroyed by the Danes but was subsequently rebuilt and at the time of the Domesday survey of 1086 it was the richest religious house in Devon. The foundation of the abbey provided the impetus for the development of the town which grew around it and around 1105 a market was granted to the abbey, followed in 1116 by the granting of the annual three-day Goose Fair. However, the abbey fell victim to Henry VIII's Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1539 and it was granted to Lord John Russell. In about 1725 many of the buildings of the abbey were demolished to facilitate the construction of Bedford Square, a large house (later the Bedford Hotel), Bedford Place and Abbey Place. Between 1803-17 a canal was constructed to link Tavistock with the port and mines at Morwellham in the Tamar Valley and a canal feeder was cut through the area of the former abbey precinct in a course more or less parallel to the River Tavy. Further development in the 19th century led to the construction of Plymouth Road which provided a main thoroughfare from the west of the town through to Bedford Square, the Abbey Church having all but disappeared by this stage. Various commentators have produced plans and drawings of the abbey's appearance before it was demolished, the best known bing Lady Radford's plan anf Finberg's reconstruction drawing which forms part of a detailed history; the latest attempt at a plan using all the information gathered until 1998 was produces by Blaylock, building upon the earlier work and it is considered that the extent of the abbey and the location of many of its buildings in the Medieval period is now particularly well researched and known.
A number of features are excluded from the scheduling; these are Abbey Chapel, the Bedford Hotel and all of its outbuildings, the West Devon Club and its steward's house, the National Rivers Authority hut in the garden of the West Devon Club, the Poat Office, Bedford Chambers, the Guildhall/Magistrates Court, the Police Station (also known as Trowte's House), the Sergeant's House, the building immediately east of Court Gate and any other buildings constructed after the Dissolution, although the ground beneath all of these buildings is included. All street furniture, surfaces, fencing and the canal are also excluded from the scheduling.

Gibbons, P., 2001, Tavistock Abbey: Christian Brethren Chapel Tower Archaeological Watching Brief, 1 (Report - Watching Brief). SDV256461.

Blaylock, S. R., 2001, Tavistock Abbey: Further Recording of the Standing Fabric (Report - non-specific). SDV256395.

In 2001 further recording of the standing remains of Tavistock Abbey was undertaken. This included a digital survey of the ruins, recording of the Abbey Chapel, the still tower and in the rear yard of the Bedford Hotel. The survey established slightly different alignments for various features including the church and cloister.

Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2002 - 2009, Tavistock Abbey (Correspondence). SDV349246.

A request for a variation to the Scheduled Monument consent granted in relation to works at Tavistock Abbey which is agreed.

Bradley, J. + Gaimster, M., 2004, Medieval Britain and Ireland in 2003, 255-257 (Article in Serial). SDV342122.

Tavistock, Tavistock Abbey (SX4815 7441). Upstanding building recording, new survey to establish interrelationship of surviving elements (ongoing) and geophysical survey performed by GSB prospection of much of the east half of the churchyard of Saint Eustachius Church showed substantial material surviving of the nave and north aisle.

Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2005, Proposed Works at Tavistock Abbey (Correspondence). SDV322597.

Scheduled monument consent granted, subject to conditions, for works concerning the installation of 4 cycle racks.

Clelland, S., 2007, Proposed Function Room and Lift Installation, Bedford Hotel, Tavistock, Devon: Archaeological Trial Pit Evaluation Report, 1-3, 9; figures 1-5 (Report - Evaluation). SDV347329.

An archaeological trial pit evaluation was undertaken on land at the Bedford Hotel in order to provide physical evidence for the presence or absence of archaeological remains within the proposed development area, situated in a small courtyard between the Bedford Hotel and Abbey Chapel, and to establish the probable extent, character, date, condition and quality of any, if present. The results of this archaeological evaluation revealed that a substantial degree of demolition and levelling occurred during the post-medieval and modern periods, and there were no surviving remains pertaining to Tavistock Abbey.

Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2007, Works at: Tavistock Abbey, Tavistock, Devon (Correspondence). SDV338075.

Letter regarding unauthorized works to unblock the drain adjacent to the Court Gate.

Blaylock, S., 2008, Tavistock: Bedford Hotel. Observations in the Rear Courtyard, October 2008, 1-4 (Report - Survey). SDV347934.

A medieval trefoil-headed window was discovered in the north wall of the block projecting from the north-west corner of the Abbey Chapel (formerly the Abbot's Hall), in the rear courtyard of the Bedford Hotel. An area of slate was removed during a construction project to form a function room at first-floor level in the area of the former courtyard which gave access to the Abbot's lodgings in the late Middle Ages. When the slate was removed, a section of rubble masonry wall containing a blocked single light window with the worn remains of a cusped trefoil head was exposed. The window frame is entirely of Hurdwick stone, and is of integral build with facework masonry of Hurdwick stone rubble to either side. This is likely to be the earliest feature of this part of the building, however it is not closely dateable beyond a generally 'late medieval' bracket, although the use of Hurdwick stone for a detail of this sort suggests a date before the late 15th century. Drawings of elevations.

West Devon Borough Council, 2009, Tavistock Conservation Area Management Plan, 2, 4, 11, 21, 40 (Report - non-specific). SDV351411.

Repairs are needed to some of the abbey remains, most particularly the Still House, some of the abbey precinct walls and Betsy Grimbal's Tower.

National Monuments Record, 2010, 437967 (National Monuments Record Database). SDV344356.

Remains of Tavistock Abbey sited in the centre of the town of Tavistock on the north side of the River Tavy south west Dartmoor. Originally the Benedictine Abbey of St Mary the Virgin and St Rumon begun by Ealdorman Ordgar and completed by his son Ordulf 975-80. It was burnt down by the Danes in 997 but was soon restored. The abbot and 20 monks surrendered the monastery in 1539. Remains include two sections of boundary wall, the Great Gate (west entrance to the precincts), the 'still-house' (a small square tower), the Abbot's Hall and its porch, the Abbey Gatehouse also called Higher Gate or Town Gate and some ancillary buildings on the eastern boundary of the Abbey precincts, possibly the Abbey Mill. Dependencies: Trseco, Cowick (Exeter), Denbury.

Passmore, A. J., 2010, Historic Building Recording at the Bedford Hotel,Tavistock, Devon, 2008, 5; figures 2-5 (Report - Survey). SDV347936.

Historic building recording was undertaken during alterations to the Bedford Hotel, which included the addition of new internal walls and the insertion of windows into medieval fabric. The outbuildings at the rear of the Bedford Hotel were formed within the footprint of existing buildings to the south of the hotel, including the former medieval Abbot's lodging. Medieval fabric survives within the 'hall' building, the adjacent passage and the range to the west, now incorporated within 19th century hotel rooms. The function of this latter range is not known, but its relationship with the hall and passage may hint at least partially as a service range. This range was enlarged in the 19th century when it formed the west side of a new hotel courtyard situated between the main abbey complex and the West Gate. New internal walls were added, and windows inserted into the eastern courtyard elevation.

Houghton, P., 2011, The Deserted and Shrunken Settlements of Milton Abbot Parish in West Devon, 1 (Undergraduate Dissertation). SDV352225.

Steinmetzer, M., 2012, Gas Main Replacement, Plymouth Road, Tavistock: Programme of Archaeological Works (Report - Watching Brief). SDV352335.

The watching brief identified the remains of features and deposits associated with the Benedictine Abbey. The works confirmed the presence, and identified the location of features, known from historical sources and previous excavations. To the south-west of the abbey church, Trench 1 exposed the truncated remains of the west wall of the western claustral range and floor make-up material associated with it. Two probable pits were identified within the western range. It is possible that a grave identified immediately outside the western wall was contemporary with the monastery. At the eastern end of the Abbey Church the truncated remains of the south wall were exposed in Trench 5. A single architectural fragment, belonging to an earlier phase of monastic building, was recovered from this wall foundation. This suggests that this wall is secondary and probably represents the wall of a chapel added to the south side of the original choir. A number of demolition layers were identified in Trench 4. This was located in the area of the eastern range and probably related to various phases of monastic building clearance, known to have taken place once the abbey passed into private ownership following the Dissolution.

Historic England, 2017, Tavistock Abbey, Application for Scheduled Monument Consent
Tavistock Abbey, Application for Scheduled Monument Consent
(Schedule Document). SDV360557.

Scheduled Monument Consent letter.
Application on behalf of Western Power Distribution. Excavation of a trench and pit for electricity supply.

Rodwell, K. A., 30/06/1995, A Survey of Tavistock Abbey Precinct Wall (Report - Survey). SDV256456.

Copeland, G. W., c1965, Photos (Record Office Collection). SDV358497.

Sources / Further Reading

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SDV17562Monograph: Hoskins, W. G.. 1954. A New Survey of England: Devon. A New Survey of England: Devon. A5 Hardback. 485, 487-488.
SDV249288Article in Serial: Reed, H.. 1927. Proceedings of the Congress of the British Archaeological Association at Exeter. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 33. Unknown. 21-22.
SDV249296Article in Serial: Radford, E. L.. 1932 - 1933. The Buildings of Tavistock Abbey after the Dissolution. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 17. Unknown. 195-203.
SDV249301Article in Serial: Freeman, M. + Wans, J.. 1996. Tavistock Abbey: Alternative Interpretations. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 128. A5 Paperback. 17-34.
SDV256355Article in Serial: Reed, H.. 1927. Architectural Notes on Some Churches Visited During the Congress.. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 33. Unknown. 166-168.
SDV256356Article in Serial: Birch, W de G.. 1872. On Three Lists of Monasteries Compiled in the Thirteenth Century. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 28. Unknown. 45-64.
SDV256360Article in Serial: Worth, R. N.. 1875. The Economic Geology of Devon. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 7. Unknown. 215.
SDV256363Article in Serial: Alexander, J. J.. 1942. The Beginnings of Tavistock. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 74. A5 Hardback. 185-193.
SDV256364Article in Serial: Alexander, J. J.. 1936 - 1937. St. Rumon. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 19. Unknown. 345-350.
SDV256366Article in Serial: Thompson, G. S.. 1932 - 1933. Exeter and the Russell Earls of Bedford. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 17. Unknown. 13.
SDV256371Article in Serial: Alexander, J. J.. 1942 - 1946. Sihtric, Fourth Abbot of Tavistock. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 22. Unknown. 101.
SDV256373Article in Serial: Karslake, E. K. H.. 1942 - 1946. St. Rumon. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 22. Unknown. 281-285.
SDV256383Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1994. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV256384Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1994. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV256385Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1994. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV256388Personal Comment: Salvatore, J. P.. 1999. 144445.. Monument Protection Programme. Archaeological Item Dataset.. Unknown.
SDV256392List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of National Heritage. 2000. 10th Amendment of 37th List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Historic Houses Register. Unknown.
SDV256395Report - non-specific: Blaylock, S. R.. 2001. Tavistock Abbey: Further Recording of the Standing Fabric. Exeter Archaeology Report. 01.82. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV256397Aerial Photograph: National Monuments Record. SX4774. Photograph (Paper).
SDV256398Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. 1948 - 1950. SX47SE4. OSAD Card. Card Index + Digital.
SDV256400Article in Serial: Radford, G. H.. 1914. Tavistock Abbey. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 46. A5 Hardback. 123-6, 143-6, 149.
SDV256401Article in Serial: Hicks, C. E.. 1947. Tavistock: The Changing Scene in the Last Two Centuries. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 79. A5 Hardback. 155-8; plates 10-13..
SDV256408Unknown: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1951. Tavistock Abbey: A Study in the Social and Economic History in Devon. Unknown.
SDV256410Article in Serial: Appleton, E.. 1866. Archaeological Notes on Tavistock and Neighbourhood. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 1. Unknown. Part 5, 122-126.
SDV256417Article in Serial: Anonymous. 1937. Proceedings of the 76th annual meeting. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 69. Unknown. 14.
SDV256419Article in Serial: R. B. M.. 1924 - 1925. John Chubbe, Abbot of Tavistock. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 13. Unknown. 130-132.
SDV256420Article in Serial: R. B. M.. 1928 - 1929. John Dynyngton, Abbot of Tavistock. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 15. Unknown. 147-148.
SDV256423Article in Serial: Rose-Troup, D.. 1936 - 1937. Cartularies of Religious Houses in Devon. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 19. Unknown. 142-144.
SDV256425Article in Serial: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1942 - 1946. The Cartulary of Tavistock. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 22. Unknown. 55-61.
SDV256427Article in Serial: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1942 - 1946. Abbots of Tavistock. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 22. Unknown. 159-162, 174-175, 186-188, 194-197.
SDV256429Article in Serial: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1942 - 1946. St. Rumon. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 22. Unknown. 331-332.
SDV256430Article in Serial: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1942 - 1946. A Vice-Archdeacon's Legacies. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 22. Unknown. 285-287.
SDV256431Article in Serial: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1942 - 1946. The Tragi-Comedy of Abbot Bonus. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 22. Unknown. 341-347.
SDV256432Article in Serial: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1947 - 1949. A Cellarer's Account-Book. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 23. Unknown. 253-255.
SDV256433Article in Serial: Hicks, H. R.. 1947 - 1949. Tavistock Water Gate. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 23. Unknown. 119.
SDV256434Article in Serial: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1947 - 1949. Prelude to Abbot Bonus. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 23. Unknown. 184-187.
SDV256436Article in Serial: Hicks, H. R.. 1947 - 1949. Ministers of the Abbey Chapel, Tavistock. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 23. Unknown. 212-215.
SDV256437List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1950. Tavistock UD. Historic Houses Register. A4 Spiral Bound. 2.
SDV256438Article in Serial: Woolner, D. H.. 1965 - 1967. Tavistock Abbey Church. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 30. Unknown. 7-10.
SDV256440Monograph: Finberg, H. P. R.. 1969. Tavistock Abbey: A Study in the Social and Economic History in Devon. Tavistock Abbey: A Study in the Social and Economic History in Devon. Unknown.
SDV256441Article in Serial: Radford, C. A. R.. 1975. The Pre-Conquest Church and the Old Minsters in Devon. Devon Historian. 11. Unknown. 2-11.
SDV256444Report - Assessment: Turton, S. D. + Weddell, P. J.. 1991. Archaeological Assessment of Four Areas of Land Adjoining the River Tavy and Plymouth Road, Tavistock. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 91.33. A4 Stapled + Digital. 1-7.
SDV256450Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1986. DAP/HO. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 5-10.
SDV256451Report - Assessment: Blaylock, S. R.. 1998. Tavistock Abbey, Devon: Assessment and Recording of the Standing Fabric 1998. Exeter Archaeology Report. 98.75. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV256454Article in Serial: Radford. 1929. Tavistock Abbey. Transactions of the Exeter Diocese Architectural and Archaeological Society. 4.2. Unknown.
SDV256456Report - Survey: Rodwell, K. A.. 30/06/1995. A Survey of Tavistock Abbey Precinct Wall. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV256461Report - Watching Brief: Gibbons, P.. 2001. Tavistock Abbey: Christian Brethren Chapel Tower Archaeological Watching Brief. Paul Gibbons Associates. 107. A4 Stapled + Digital. 1.
SDV259004Monograph: Kingdon, E. V.. Guide to Tavistock Abbey Remains. Unknown.
SDV272550List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1983. Tavistock. Historic Houses Register. A4 Comb Bound. 2.
SDV322349Article in Serial: Alexander, J. J.. 1937. Tavistock in the 15th century. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 69. Unknown. 247-285.
SDV322350Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2000. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Unknown.
SDV322597Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2005. Proposed Works at Tavistock Abbey. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. A4 Stapled.
SDV323253Monograph: Knowles, D. + Hadcock, R. N.. 1971. Medieval Religious Houses: England and Wales. Medieval Religious Houses: England and Wales. Unknown + Digital (part). 57, 77.
SDV336077Article in Serial: Pearce, S. M.. 1982. Church and Society in South Devon, AD 350-700. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 40. Paperback Volume. 3-4.
SDV336200Article in Serial: Stead, P. M.. 1999. Archaeological Investigations at Tavistock Abbey 1997-1999. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 57. Paperback Volume. 149-203; figures 1-11. [Mapped feature: #90163 ]
SDV336217Monograph: Pevsner, N.. 1952. The Buildings of England: South Devon. The Buildings of England: South Devon. Paperback Volume. 277-278.
SDV337942Record Office Collection: Swete, R. J. (Revd). 1792-1801. 564M 'Picturesque Sketches of Devon' by Reverend John Swete. Devon Record Office Collection. Unknown + Digital. 4/160,163,16/75,13/3.
SDV338075Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2007. Works at: Tavistock Abbey, Tavistock, Devon. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
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SDV341346Report - Survey: Timms, S. C.. 1976. The Devon Urban Survey, 1976. First Draft. Devon Committee for Rescue Archaeology Report. A4 Unbound + Digital. 165, 169, 173, 179.
SDV342122Article in Serial: Bradley, J. + Gaimster, M.. 2004. Medieval Britain and Ireland in 2003. Medieval Archaeology. 48. Unknown. 255-257.
SDV344347Report - Assessment: Exeter Archaeology. 1997. Archaeological Assessment of Tavistock Sewer Overflows Scheme. Exeter Archaeology Report. 97.02. A4 Stapled + Digital. 2-3.
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SDV344377Schedule Document: Ministry of Works. 1924. Tavistock Abbey Ruins. The Schedule of Monuments. Foolscap.
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SDV347936Report - Survey: Passmore, A. J.. 2010. Historic Building Recording at the Bedford Hotel,Tavistock, Devon, 2008. Exeter Archaeology Report. 10.51. A4 Stapled + Digital. 5; figures 2-5.
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SDV358497Record Office Collection: Copeland, G. W.. c1965. Photos. Photocopy + Digital.
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Associated Monuments

MDV43876Parent of: Abbey Chapel, Forecourt Wall and Piers, Tavistock (Building)
MDV43871Parent of: Betsy Grimbal's Tower, Tavistock (Building)
MDV11799Parent of: Court Gate, Tavistock Abbey (Building)
MDV100925Parent of: Former Cloister, Tavistock Abbey (Monument)
MDV43877Parent of: Lower Abbey Gate, or Water Gate, Tavistock Abbey (Monument)
MDV3922Parent of: Porch of Abbey Chapel, Tavistock (Building)
MDV3923Parent of: Printing House at Tavistock Abbey (Monument)
MDV71905Parent of: Remains of Cloister and Abbey Church Walls (Building)
MDV43875Parent of: South Precinct Wall of Tavistock Abbey (Building)
MDV43873Parent of: Still House, Tavistock Abbey (Building)
MDV3920Parent of: Stone Coffin, Betsy Grimball's Tower (Monument)
MDV43870Parent of: Tavistock Abbey Church (Building)
MDV3924Parent of: Tavistock Abbey Mill (Building)
MDV3925Parent of: Town Corn Mill, Tavistock (Building)
MDV43874Parent of: Wall south-west of Still House, Tavistock Abbey (Building)
MDV43887Parent of: Water Channel West of Tavistock Abbey (Monument)
MDV43872Parent of: West Precinct Wall at Tavistock Abbey (Monument)
MDV76386Related to: 7 Drake Road, Tavistock (Building)
MDV124667Related to: Abbey Wharf, Tavistock (Monument)
MDV66675Related to: Abbot's Weir north of the Virtuous Lady Mine (Monument)
MDV23053Related to: Bedford Chambers, Abbey Place, Tavistock (Building)
MDV123096Related to: Bridges over the Canal in the grounds of Tavistock Abbey (Monument)
MDV70248Related to: BUILDING in the Parish of Tavistock (Monument)
MDV123097Related to: Canal Bridge at the rear of the Vicarage, Tavistock (Monument)
MDV124531Related to: Canal Bridge, Tavistock Town (Monument)
MDV4065Related to: Crowndale Medieval Settlement (Monument)
MDV265Related to: Hatherleigh, St John the Baptist's Parish Church (Building)
MDV21792Related to: Medieval Borough of Tavistock (Monument)
MDV3852Related to: Old mansion house at Kilworthy, Tavistock (Building)
MDV72669Related to: Police Station and Former Fire engine house, Guildhall Square, Tavistock (Building)
MDV19148Related to: Possible Fishponds West of Tavistock Abbey (Monument)
MDV23054Related to: Post Office, Abbey Place, Tavistock (Building)
MDV8640Related to: PRIORY in the Parish of Ipplepen (Monument)
MDV746Related to: Romansleigh, St. Rumon's Church (Building)
MDV15171Related to: St. Andrew's Priory, Cowick, Exeter (Monument)
MDV76330Related to: Tavistock (Monument)
MDV29023Related to: Tavistock Guildhall (Building)
MDV3949Related to: The Old West Bridge (Monument)
MDV3928Related to: Three Inscribed Stones in Vicarage Garden, Tavistock (Monument)
MDV23055Related to: West Devon Club, Abbey Place, Tavistock (Building)

Associated Finds

  • FDV1026 - ARCHITECTURAL FRAGMENT (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1030 - BONE NON SPECIFIC (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1029 - CHALICE (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1028 - ORNAMENT (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1023 - POT (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1022 - TILE (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1025 - COIN (XIII - 1201 AD to 1300 AD)
  • FDV1027 - ARCHITECTURAL FRAGMENT (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1750 AD)
  • FDV1024 - POT (Post Medieval - 1540 AD to 1750 AD)

Associated Events

  • EDV4255 - Investigations at Tavistock Sewer Improvement Scheme
  • EDV4256 - Tavistock Town Centre Enhancement Works
  • EDV4597 - Assessment of Tavistock Sewer Overflow Scheme
  • EDV5091 - Archaeological Trial Pit Evaluation at the Bedford Hotel, Tavistock
  • EDV5384 - Recording of Trefoil-Headed Window at the Bedford Hotel
  • EDV5385 - Historic Building Recording at the Bedford Hotel, Tavistock
  • EDV6254 - Programme of Archaeological Works Associated with Gas Main Replacement at Plymouth Road, Tavistock (Ref: 3793)

Date Last Edited:Oct 29 2019 12:15PM