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HER Number:MDV40270
Name:Mearsdon, 32 Cross Street, Moretonhampstead

Summary

House occupies one of the eight large burbage plots to the south of the central square laid out in or before 1207. A sale deed dated 1300 relating to the property has been uncovered. Documentation has dated this property from to the 13th century onwards and detailed ownership records confirmed. The house was rebuilt in the 15th century as a single-storey, three-room and cross passage house, open to the rafters throughout, and later altered in the 16th and early 17th centuries. Divided into four tenements in the mid-18th century, it was further remodelled in circa mid-19th century and extended circa early 20th century. Now known as Mearsdon.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 754 860
Map Sheet:SX78NE
Admin AreaDartmoor National Park
Civil ParishMoretonhampstead
DistrictTeignbridge
Ecclesiastical ParishMORETONHAMPSTEAD

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX78NE/279
  • Old Listed Building Ref (II*): 85051

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • HOUSE (Constructed, XIII to XIV - 1300 AD? to 1399 AD (Between))
  • CROSS PASSAGE HOUSE (Constructed, XIV to XV - 1400 AD to 1499 AD (Between))

Full description

Devon County Council, 1838-1848, Tithe Mosaic, approximately 1838-1848 (Cartographic). SDV349431.

Part of the range of buildings depicted on the south side of Cross Street.


Ordnance Survey, 1880-1899, First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map (Cartographic). SDV336179.

More subdivisions now indicated on the late 19th century historic map.


Department of Environment, 1987, Moretonhampstead, 77-78 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV337636.

No 32, Mearsdon Manor, Cross Street (south side), Moretonhampstead.
House, now in use as tea room and shop with private accommodation on first floor and at rear. Probably late c15 or early c16, altered later in c16 and early c17, remodelled in circa mid c19 and extended circa early c20. Roughcast granite rubble. Gable-ended roof with interlocking clay tiles, crested ridge tiles and projecting eaves. Axial ridge stacks; left-hand former higher end stack has rendered brick shaft; right-hand lower room stack, granite with tapered cap. Large granite ashlar lateral hall stack projecting to right of centre with chamfered plinth, moulded cornice and tapered shaft.3-room-and-through-passage plan, originally open to the roof over the hall and higher end, which were divided by low screens. It was probably open to the roof at lower end also but as there is only one surviving original truss, which is over the higher end of the hall, the development of the lower is conjectural. The inner room was floored later in c16 creating a first floor chamber and it seems likely that the lower end was floored at the same time. The next phase was the flooring of the hall, probably in early c17 when the front lateral hall stack was built and possibly the lower room stack with an oven was also inserted at this time in the unusual position at the higher end of the lower room backing onto the passage. The stack at the higher end was probably built when the chamber over the inner room was created. Later in the c17 the house was extended at the higher end where in c19 a carriageway was put through. In circa mid c19 the front was entirely refenestrated. In circa early c20 an extension containing a staircase at the back of the lower end and a large rear extension were built.
2 storeys. Long, asymmetrical 6-window range. C19 12-pane sashes without horns except for first floor left which has horns. Ground floor right 12-pane fixed-light window. Extension to left has 2-light casement at mid floor level and carriageway through with timber door-frame and concealed lintel. C19 panelled and glazed door to left of centre with canopy on shaped brackets. Over the central former hall window there is a granite hoodmould. To the right of the lateral hall stack the passage doorway with massive timber doorframe with carpenter's mitres and hollow and ovolo moulding, base of one jamb replaced and the other is very worn. Old nail-studded plank door, cross-planked on inner side and with wrought iron hinges. The early c20 rear extension is an almost detached 2-storey building of granite rubble. Roof: only one original truss survives and this is only visible above collar level. It seems to be situated over the higher end of the hall. The apex and collar are morticed. There are holes for a threaded ridge-piece and for the purlins. The truss is smoke-blackened on both sides and on the lower west side there is smoke-blackened plaster. Apart from this truss and a later clean truss with trenched purlins over the extension at the higher end, the roof has been entirely replaced at higher level with soft wood king-post trusses.
Interior: plank and muntin screen between hall and passage with chamfered muntins on hall side with pyramid stops; ovolo moulded muntins and rail with carpenter's mitres on passage side with worn oval-shaped stops; the head beam is moulded on the passage side with ovolo and hollow mouldings, and square section on hall side; widened doorway opening to hall. Screen between inner room and hall replaced or covered with early c17 panelling with projecting frieze below the head beam which possibly conceals on internal jetty; the old sole plate survives at base of the screen. The head beam and main cross beam are deeply chamfered with hollow step stops. There is another cross-beam, roughly chamfered and without stops, at lower end of hall near the screen. Lateral hall fireplace with chamfered granite monolithic jambs now without stops and massive granite lintel concealed behind a c20 board. Inner room fireplace blocked. Longitudinal beam deeply chamfered and with stops in inner room. Backing onto lower side of passage a stack with granite ashlar back with chamfered plinth and cornice; the fireplace has chamfered monolithic granite jambs; if there were stops they have been worn off; ovolo-moulded wooden lintel with chamfered mason's mitres to the jambs suggesting that if the lintel were a later replacement it has been made especially for this fireplace; oven with segmental granite arch doorway and granite lined. Doorway to passage has heavy ovolo-moulded frame with carpenter's mitres and rather worn urn-shaped stops. The longitudinal beam in lower room is roughly chamfered and without stops. Blocked doorway in rear wall of lower room. The first floor rooms have been enlarged and remodelled in the mid c19 when the roof was heightened. Circa early c20 stairs in large stair well at rear of lower end and passage.


Ordnance Survey, 2016, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV359352.


Historic England, 2016, National Heritage List for England (National Heritage List for England). SDV359353.

MORETONHAMPSTEAD CROSS STREET (south side), SX 7586 Moretonhampstead 8/116 No. 32, Mearsdon Manor - 23.8.55 GV II*
House, now in use as tea room and shop with private accommodation on first floor and at rear. Probably late C15 or early C16, altered later in C16 and early C17, remodelled in circa mid C19 and extended circa early C20. Roughcast granite rubble. Gable-ended roof with interlocking clay tiles, crested ridge tiles and projecting eaves. Axial ridge stacks; left-hand former higher end stack has rendered brick shaft; right-hand lower room stack, granite with tapered cap. Large granite ashlar lateral hall stack projecting to right of centre with chamfered plinth, moulded cornice and tapered shaft.
3-room-and-through-passage plan, originally open to the roof over the hall and higher end, which were divided by low screens. It was probably open to the roof at lower end also but as there is only one surviving original truss, which is over the higher end of the hall, the development of the lower is conjectural. The inner room was floored later in C16 creating a first floor chamber and it seems likely that the lower end was floored at the same time. The next phase was the flooring of the hall, probably in early C17 when the front lateral hall stack was built and possibly the lower room stack with an oven was also inserted at this time in the unusual position at the higher end of the lower room backing onto the passage. The stack at the higher end was probably built when the chamber over the inner room was created. Later in the C17 the house was extended at the higher end where in C19 a carriageway was put through. In circa mid C19 the front was entirely refenestrated. In circa early C20 an extension containing a staircase at the back of the lower end and a large rear extension were built.
2 storeys. Long, asymmetrical 6-window range. C19 12-pane sashes without horns except for first floor left which has horns. Ground floor right 12-pane fixed- light window. Extension to left has 2-light casement at mid floor level and carriageway through with timber door-frame and concealed lintel. C19 panelled and glazed door to left of centre with canopy on shaped brackets. Over the central former hall window there is a granite hoodmould. To the right of the lateral hall stack the passage doorway with massive timber doorframe with carpenter's mitres and hollow and ovolo moulding, base of one jamb replaced and the other is very worn. Old nail-studded plank door, cross-planked on inner side and with wrought iron hinges. The early C20 rear extension is an almost detached 2-storey building of granite rubble.
Roof: only one original truss survives and this is only visible above collar level. It seems to be situated over the higher end of the hall. The apex and collar are morticed. There are holes for a threaded ridge-piece and for the purlins. The truss is smoke-blackened on both sides and on the lower west side there is smoke- blackened plaster. Apart from this truss and a later clean truss with trenched purlins over the extension at the higher end, the roof has been entirely replaced at higher level with soft wood king-post trusses.
Interior: plank and muntin screen between hall and passage with chamfered muntins on hall side with pyramid stops; ovolo moulded muntins and rail with carpenter's mitres on passage side with worn oval-shaped stops; the head beam is moulded on the passage side with ovolo and hollow mouldings, and square section on hall side; widened doorway opening to hall. Screen between inner room and hall replaced or covered with early C17 panelling with projecting frieze below the head beam which possibly conceals on internal jetty; the old sole plate survives at base of the screen. The head beam and main cross beam are deeply chamfered with hollow step stops. There is another cross-beam, roughly chamfered and without stops, at lower end of hall near the screen. Lateral hall fireplace with chamfered granite monoloithic jambs now without stops and massive granite lintel concealed behind a C20 board. Inner room fireplace blocked. Longitudinal beam deeply chamfered and with stops in inner room. Backing onto lower side of passage a stack with granite ashlar back with chamfered plinth and cornice; the fireplace has chamfered monolithic granite jambs; if there were stops they have been worn off; ovolo-moulded wooden lintel with chamfered mason's mitres to the jambs suggesting that if the lintel were a later replacement it has been made especially for this fireplace; oven with segmental granite arch doorway and granite lined. Doorway to passage has heavy ovolo-moulded frame with carpenter's mitres and rather worn urn-shaped stops. The longitudinal beam in lower room is roughly chamfered and without stops. Blocked doorway in rear wall of lower room. The first floor rooms have been enlarged and remodelled in the mid C19 when the roof was heightened. Circa early C20 stairs in large stair well at rear of lower end and passage. It is said that this is the site of the Saxon Barton of circa 700 AD. Sir Philip Courtenay came into the possession of Moreton in 1309 when he enlarged and improved the Barton to become his manor house. Mearsdon Manor is a substantial late medieval house which in spite of C19 remodelling retains many high quality interior features. Externally the large lateral stack and the old doorway, together with the complete C19 fenestration, are an important feature in Cross Street.
Listing NGR: SX7546786024


Unknown, 2019, Heritage Statement for Mearsdon, Moretonhampstead (Report - Assessment). SDV363195.

House occupies one of the eight large burbage plots to the south of the central square laid out in or before 1207. A sale deed dated 1300 relating to the property has been uncovered. Full picture of the ownership of this house from the 13th century and more detail of the period 1590-1800 established through documentary research. Photographs of the two main old rooms and an upstairs room were taken in 1919 and published in 1920 in the Transactions of the Devonshire Association.
A laser survey of the house reveals the front wall (three fee thick) is likely to have been part of an earlier structure incorporated into the current one. Parts of the house may date back to the 13th century, although it was rebuilt in the 15th century as a single-storey three-room and cross passage house, open to the rafters. The listing details further remodelling of the house.
The house appears to have been divided around 1700, but was spit further in the mid-18th century into four separate tenements, which were then let out. Further details of alterations in the 18th-20th centuries noted.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV336179Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1880-1899. First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map. First Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Map (Digital).
SDV337636List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1987. Moretonhampstead. Historic Houses Register. A4 Spiral Bound. 77-78.
SDV349431Cartographic: Devon County Council. 1838-1848. Tithe Mosaic, approximately 1838-1848. Digitised Tithe Map. Digital.
SDV359352Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2016. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital. [Mapped feature: #90685 ]
SDV359353National Heritage List for England: Historic England. 2016. National Heritage List for England. Historic Houses Register. Digital.

Associated Monuments

MDV8282Related to: 27 Cross Street, Moretonhampstead (Building)
MDV40268Related to: Former Coach House, Cross Street, Moretonhampstead (Building)
MDV40269Related to: The Rectory, Cross Street, Moretonhampstead (Building)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:Aug 30 2019 4:26PM