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HER Number:MDV44539
Name:Lavender Cottage and Holly Cottage, formerly Waytown Farmhouse, Horns Cross, Bideford

Summary

Former early 18th century farmhouse which was converted into two cottages in the late 20th century.

Location

Grid Reference:SS 368 228
Map Sheet:SS32SE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishParkham
DistrictTorridge
Ecclesiastical ParishPARKHAM

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SS32SE/47
  • Old Listed Building Ref (II)

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • FARMHOUSE (Built, XVIII - 1701 AD to 1800 AD (Between))
  • COTTAGE NON SPECIFIC (Converted, XX - 1980 AD to 1999 AD (Between))

Full description

Department of Environment, 1988, Parkham, 178 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV16647.

Lower Waytown. Farmhouse. Late C17/early C18 with C18 extension to right. Colourwashed render over coursed slatestone rubble to left, and over cob and stone to right; gabled thatch roof; mid/late C19 brick ridge and right end stacks, and left end external stack of stone finished in mid/late C19 brick.2-unit extended to 4-unit plan. 2 storeys; 4-window range. Two C20 doors with lean-to porches to left and right. Timber lintels over mid/late C19 two-light casements to right and C20 casements to left; early C19 two-light casements with glazing bars to first floor left of centre. Interior inspection not possible but noted as having chamfered beams and open fireplaces.


Historic England, 2018, Lavender Cottage and Holly Cottage, Horns Cross, Bideford (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV361824.

Notification that Historic England has received a request to remove Lavender Cottage and Holly Cottage, formerly known as Lower Waytown from the List. They have completed an assessment report setting out the details.
History
Lower Waytown Farm is believed to have originated in the early C18. It is marked on the original series Ordnance Survey of 1809-1820, and is shown clearly on the 1840 Tithe and maps of the later C19 and early C20. The farmhouse appears to have been built in two principal phases; the two southernmost bays represent the first phase, to which an extension was made in the later C18 or early C19. The farmstead was sold in 1987 and a survey drawing shows that the farmhouse was, at that stage, subdivided into two dwellings. This building was reconfigured and renovated soon afterwards; works included the insertion of a subdividing wall and fireplace between the two main rooms of the original building, and the replacement of the westernmost part of the roof. The adjoining barns were converted to residential use. The associated shippon and pigsties were converted to residential use in the early C21. The buildings have been renamed: the farmhouse is now known as Holly Cottage (to the west) and Lavender Cottage (to the east). The adjoining converted barns are known as the Round House. The former shippon and pigsties are now known as Lower Waytown Farm.
Details
Farmhouse, originating in the early C18 and subsequently extended, and reconfigured to form two dwellings.
MATERIALS: the early part of the building is slatestone rubble, and the eastern extension appears to be rendered cob. It has a thatched roof and brick chimneystacks.
PLAN: the building is a linear range of three main cells. The dwelling now known as Holly Cottage occupies the westernmost cell, within the original farmhouse. Lavender Cottage occupies the remainder of the building to the east: the eastern cell of the original farmhouse, the eastern extension, and the northern outshut.
EXTERIOR: the building faces south, onto the former farmyard. The two main phases of construction are clearly evident in the building line, which steps back on the right, indicating the extension. On the left, there are two wide bays with a door on the left beneath a lean-to porch. On the right, there are two irregular bays and a similar doorway and porch. Windows are C20 casements in their original openings. The thatched roof has a chimneystack at either end, and at the central point of the original farmhouse. The north elevation has a number of irregular window openings to the right, and to the left, a two-storey outshut. The west gable end has a single ground-floor window. The east gable end abuts the Round House.
INTERIOR: Lavender Cottage has two staircases, reflecting the fact that the eastern extension was once used as a separate dwelling. On the ground floor, there is a wide stone fireplace in the westernmost room; the alcoves on either side indicate the locations of a former winder stair and doorway into what is now Holly Cottage. The easternmost room has a complete floor frame with a deep chamfered cross beam and joists. The wide stone fireplace, heavily repointed, has bread oven and a deep timber lintel with taper marks. The timber door
case into the living room has been inserted from an earlier building. In Holly Cottage, the gable fireplace survives, and has a chamfered timber lintel. The roof above Holly Cottage has been rebuilt; above Lavender Cottage it survives, with some reinforcing and replacement timbers.
SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: the Round House stands to the west of Holly Cottage. It was converted to a dwelling from a series of agricultural buildings in 1987 and has been largely rebuilt and extended to the first floor. The former shippon and pigsties, now known as Lower Waytown Farm, stand to the south-east. These were converted and extended to form a dwelling in the early C21.


Historic England, 2018, Lower Waytown (Holly Cottage and Lavender Cottage), Horns Cross, Bideford (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV361845.

Notification that it has been decided not to remove the buildings from the List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. The special interest of Lower Waytown, now Holly and Lavender Cottages, was recognised when it was added to the List in 1988. The recent assessment showed that it still retains a significant proportion of its historic fabric and remains a good example of a vernacular building. However, in the light of that reassessment the entry has been amended to update the List entry and to bring into line with modern standards and to more clearly describe the building, and to better articulate where its significance lies. See report for more information.


Ordnance Survey, 2018, MasterMap 2018 (Cartographic). SDV360652.

Buildings shown.


Historic England, 2018, National Heritage List for England, 1171574 (National Heritage List for England). SDV360653.

Holly Cottage and Lavender Cottage.
Summary
Farmhouse, originating in the early C18 and subsequently extended, and reconfigured to form two dwellings.
Reasons for Designation
Holly Cottage and Lavender Cottage are listed at Grade II, for the following principal reasons:
Architectural interest:
* a distinctive vernacular dwelling originating in the early-C18, a period in which there is a presumption in the favour of listing; * retaining a significant proportion of historic fabric, including substantial fireplaces, joinery, and part of the roof structure; * despite reconfiguration, the simple plan form of the building remains legible.
History
Lower Waytown Farm is believed to have originated in the early C18. It is marked on the original series Ordnance Survey of 1809-1820, and is shown clearly on the 1840 Tithe and maps of the later C19 and early C20.
The farmhouse appears to have been built in two principal phases; the two southernmost bays represent the first phase, to which an extension was made in the later C18 or early C19. The farmstead was sold in 1987 and a survey drawing shows that the farmhouse was, at that stage, subdivided into two dwellings. This building was reconfigured and renovated soon afterwards; works included the insertion of a subdividing wall and fireplace between the two main rooms of the original building, and the replacement of the westernmost part of the roof. The adjoining barns were converted to residential use. The associated shippon and pigsties were converted to residential use in the early C21.
The buildings have been renamed: the farmhouse is now known as Holly Cottage (to the west) and Lavender Cottage (to the east). The adjoining converted barns are known as the Round House. The former shippon and pigsties are now known as Lower Waytown Farm.
Details
Farmhouse, originating in the early C18 and subsequently extended, and reconfigured to form two dwellings.
MATERIALS: the early part of the building is slatestone rubble, and the eastern extension appears to be rendered cob. It has a thatched roof and brick chimneystacks.
PLAN: the building is a linear range of three main cells. The dwelling now known as Holly Cottage occupies the westernmost cell, within the original farmhouse. Lavender Cottage occupies the remainder of the building to the east: the eastern cell of the original farmhouse, the eastern extension, and the northern outshut.
EXTERIOR: the building faces south, onto the former farmyard. The two main phases of construction are clearly evident in the building line, which steps back on the right, indicating the extension. On the left, there are two wide bays with a door on the left beneath a lean-to porch. On the right, there are two irregular bays and a similar doorway and porch. Windows are C20 casements in their original openings. The thatched roof has a chimneystack at either end, and at the central point of the original farmhouse.
The north elevation has a number of irregular window openings to the right, and to the left, a two-storey outshut. The west gable end has a single ground-floor window. The east gable end abuts the Round House.
INTERIOR: Lavender Cottage has two staircases, reflecting the fact that the eastern extension was once used as a separate dwelling. On the ground floor, there is a wide stone fireplace in the westernmost room; the alcoves on either side indicate the locations of a former winder stair and doorway into what is now Holly Cottage. The easternmost room has a complete floor frame with a deep chamfered cross beam and joists. The wide stone fireplace, heavily repointed, has bread oven and a deep timber lintel with taper marks. The timber door case into the living room has been inserted from an earlier building. In Holly Cottage, the gable fireplace survives, and has a chamfered timber lintel. The roof above Holly Cottage has been rebuilt; above Lavender Cottage it survives, with some reinforcing and replacement timbers.
Date first listed: 19th October 1988. Date of most recent amendment: 18th October 2018

Sources / Further Reading

SDV16647List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1988. Parkham. Historic Houses Register. A4 Spiral Bound. 178.
SDV360652Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2018. MasterMap 2018. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital. [Mapped feature: #113683 ]
SDV360653National Heritage List for England: Historic England. 2018. National Heritage List for England. Historic Houses Register. Digital. 1171574.
SDV361824List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Historic England. 2018. Lavender Cottage and Holly Cottage, Horns Cross, Bideford. Notification of Completion of Assessment. Digital.
SDV361845List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Historic England. 2018. Lower Waytown (Holly Cottage and Lavender Cottage), Horns Cross, Bideford. Notification of Decision Not to Remove Building from List. Digital.

Associated Monuments: none recorded

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:Oct 25 2018 10:53AM