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HER Number:MDV45090
Name:Dunkeswell Airfield, Dunkeswell

Summary

The Second World War airfield of Dunkeswell, to the immediate west of the village itself, is visible as a range of structures and earthwork pit and banked features on aerial photographs of 1942 onwards. The bulk of Dunkeswell Airfield has survived as a very rare example of a substantially complete Second World War airfield site. It has retained significant surviving fabric, notably the operations block, a complete hangar with its associated hurting and the control tower group.

Location

Grid Reference:ST 133 077
Map Sheet:ST10NW
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishDunkeswell
Civil ParishSheldon
DistrictEast Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishDUNKESWELL
Ecclesiastical ParishSHELDON

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • National Record of the Historic Environment: 1394048
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: ST10NW/41
  • SHINE Candidate (Yes)

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • AIRFIELD (World War II - 1939 AD to 1945 AD (Between))

Full description

1905-6, Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV129541.

Dunkeswell airfield. "airfield (disused)" marked on os 6" (1968) map. Three intersecting runways are principal feature, with hangar and airfield building complex at area st136075, dispersal bays and hangar platform area st134087, two hangar platforms and dispersal bays area st125072, and various scattered service buildings and roads. Truncated banks of pre-war field system visible on os 6" (1968) map. For original fields see os 6" (1905-6) maps (os).

APH, Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV129542.

Raf (1947) aps show airfield detail: landing strips, buildings, rectangular ?sandbagged air raid trenches, vehicle parks etc, but the exact perimeter, carved out from pre-war fields, is not so easy to define. Rough area marked on map (aph).

Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV129545.

Des=os 6"(1968)st10nw.

Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV129546.

Des=os 6"(1906)58nw.

Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV129547.

Des=os 6"(1906)47sw.

Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV129548.

Des=os 6"(1905)47se.

Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV129549.

Hellis, j. /fortress/14(aug 1992)41/the taunton stop line.

Untitled Source (Aerial Photograph). SDV129550.

Aph=raf/cpe/uk 1974/(11/04/1947)2297, 2299, 4296-4298.

Untitled Source (Aerial Photograph). SDV129551.

Aph=mod/(-/8/1993)/in smr.

Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV129553.

Willis, s. + hollis, b. /military airfields in the british isles 1939-45 (omnibus edition)/(1987)71.

Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV129554.

Walford, e. /war over the west/(1989)46-49,126.

Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV84920.

Hellis comments that dunkeswell airfield was unusual in having a battle hq (see subsheet) but no other defences or pillboxes (hellis).

Royal Air Force, 1942, RAF/16B/BR425/3, RAF/16B/BR425/3 V 059-060 02-FEB-1942 (Aerial Photograph). SDV359929.

The airfield has not yet been constructed.

Royal Air Force, 1942, RAF/FNO/38, RAF/FNO/38 RV 6003-04 11-JUL-1942 (Aerial Photograph). SDV359770.

Construction of the airfield has commenced.

United States Airforce, 1943, US/7PH/GP/LOC14, US/7PH/GP/LOC14 RV 6007-08 09-AUG-1943 (Aerial Photograph). SDV359565.

Construction of the airfield appears to have been completed and is visible as a range of structures and earthworks.

Royal Air Force, 1947, RAF/CPE/UK/1974, RAF/CPE/UK/1974 RS 4295-4299 11-APR-1947 (Aerial Photograph). SDV356127.

The airfield remains largely unchanged and is visible as a range of structures and earthworks. Map object partly based on this source.

Royal Air Force, 1950, RAF/541/534, RAF/541/534 RS 4062-63 30-MAY-1950 (Aerial Photograph). SDV357615.

The airfield remains largely unchanged.

Ordnance Survey, 1982, OS/82219 V, OS/82219 V 1631-32 03-SEP-1982 (Aerial Photograph). SDV357675.

Several structures have been demolished along the eastern edge of the airfield, although this area remains little changed. Other ancillary structures and earthworks across the remainder of the airfield remain largely extant.

Francis, P., 1995, Blackdown Hills Airfield Survey. Dunkeswell and Upottery. (Report - Survey). SDV312951.

Constructed in 1942-43 for raf coastal command but eventually manned in june 1943 by usaaf anti-submarine aircraft and then by fleet air wing 7 of the us navy, who stayed until july 1945. Continued in raf use until 1946 then used for storage and until 1980's by the home office. Civilian flying from the airfield commenced in the 1960's and continues. The airfield was built to raf standard class "a" design for heavy bombers. Three 200 yard wide runways at angles of 60 degrees. The main runway was 2000 yards long, the others being 1470 and 1270. Runways connected by a 50' wide perimeter track.50 dispersed aircraft hardstandings, mostly of "frying pan" type. Full site details given, with plans. See subsheets for individual buildings or building groups.
RAF Dunkeswell was the only parent United States Navy airfield in the United Kingdom. One important characteristic was the large number of prefabricated hutting erected here either by the United States Navy or the Air Ministry/Ministry of Works (francis).

Francis, P., 1997, United States Naval Amphibious Supply Base, Exeter, Appendix 1 (Report - non-specific). SDV347475.

Dunkeswell was a typical 'Class A' airfield built by George Wimpey and Co. Ltd. and handed over, initially to the USAAF in August 1943 and just a month later to the US Navy as their main operational airfield in the UK. The US Navy 584th Construction Batalion Maintenance Unit operated the airfield. American manufactured buildings, both airfield and domestic, comprised over 100 20-feet span SS Arch Rib Utility huts of which two survive and 14 40-feet span huts of which nine survive.

Francis, P., 1997 - 2008, United States Naval Amphibious Supply Base Exeter, Appendix 1 (Report - Assessment). SDV348060.

GetMapping, 1999 - 2000, Millennium Map 1999-2000 Getmapping (Aerial Photograph). SDV321648.

A go-karting centre has been established to the northwest and industrial units established along the eastern edge of the airfield. A number of extant structures are visible, as well as hut bases of former structures.

Lake, J., 2000, Survey of Military Aviation Sites ans Structures: Summary Report: Thematic Listing Programme: English Heritage (Report - Survey). SDV352756.

Dunkeswell is the only British airfield where the US Navy Fleet Air Wing was based during the Second World War, and is the best-preserved of all the sites in the west of Britain associated with the strategically-vital Battle of the Atlantic. The flying field at Dunkeswell owes its origin to the need to tackle the threat created by the major build-up of German U-boat bases on the Atlantic coast of France. The airfield,begun by the contractor George Wimpey in 1941, was transferred in May 1942 to 19 Group Coastal Command, but in August of that year it was occupied by the US Air Force Anti-Submarine Group 479. The task of their squadron of Liberator bombers was to patrol the sea areas which had to be crossed by U-boats en-route between their bases in France and their hunting sites in the North Atlantic. After March 1944 it became the only base in Britain occupied by the US Navy (Fleet Air Wing 7), remaining here until the end of operations in May 1945. By this time, 6,424 anti-submarine missions, principally in B24 Liberator bombers, were flown from Dunkeswell. In August of that year the RAF again took over, and the base was used for ferrying and maintenance; the RAF left in 1949.
The bulk of the airfield site, with its runways, perimeter track and hardstandings, has survived as a very rare example of a substantially complete Second World War airfield site, ranking in terms of completeness with Predannack in Cornwall, Dale in Pembrokeshire and Limavady in Northern Ireland. In contrast to the last three sites, however, Dunkeswell has retained significant surviving fabric, notably the operations block, a complete hangar with its associated hurting and the control tower group.
In addition to its uniquely important role, wartime life on the base is documented on some remarkable film archive. At its busiest, the airfield housed more than 2000 personnel, accommodated on dispersed sites. Building 68 is the best-preserved of the T-type hangars on the site, prominently located close to the control tower group and operations block and adjacent to two American prefabricated buildings: to the north are many buildings surviving from the technical site, almost all surviving in a highly adapted state.

English Heritage, 2002, Dunkeswell Airfield, Devon (Correspondence). SDV361968.

Letter highlighting the unique historical importance of the airfield and its associated structures and the challenges in how best to protect it, particularly given the dispersed layout of the site.
One structure, the Battle Headquarters, has been flagged as a candidate for scheduling and is currently being assessed.
It is also noted that demolition or part demolition of the buildings surrounding the Operations Block has been recommended on the grounds of health and safety. While it is appreciated that buildings such as the Crew Briefing Room (Building 71) and Crew Briefing Room/Office Annex (Building 72) are in poor condition, they do appear to be capable of repair and it is hoped that the health and safety issues can be resolved.
The suspended ductwork in the Operations Block itself is an important historical feature of the building and it is suggested that it be temporarily supported rather than removed.

English Heritage, 2002, Dunkeswell Airfield, Devon - Proposals for Demolition (Correspondence). SDV361967.

Letter outlining preliminary comments on proposed demolition of sites and structures following a site visit in April 2002. For the majority of the sites listed no objection to their demolition is anticipated. However, objections are expected for:
Site 4. Type 24 Sonar Mine Store. Objection anticipated due to the unique function associated with the structure which is in a relatively sound condition.
Site 8. Battle Headquarters. This is to be considered for protection through scheduling.
Site 9. Located adjacent to site 8. A possible electrical sub-station. The necessity for its demolition is not apparent.
Site 22. Fuel pump house. Further information required.

Next Perspectives, 2014, Aerial Photography for Great Britain, Next Perspectives APGB Imagery ST1206; ST1306; ST1207; ST1307; ST1208; ST1308; ST1408 08-SEP-2014 (Aerial Photograph). SDV359479.

The eastern extent of the airfield has been further developed as an industrial estate and business park, although numerous structures including hangers, stores, workshops, flight and squadron offices, for example remain extant. A number of structures and earthworks also survive across the remainder of the airfield, for example the bomb stores to the south and aircraft pens to the north.

Unknown, 2015, Land at Dunkeswell Airfield, Dunkeswell: Strip, Map and Sample (Report - Excavation). SDV360371.

An archaeological strip, map and sample excavation was undertaken by Cotswold Archaeology in July 2014 at Land at Dunkeswell Airfield, Devon, whereby Areas 1, 2, 3 and 4 were machine excavated.

The bulk of the airfield site, with its runways, perimeter track and hardstandings, has survived as a very rare example of a substantially complete Second World War airfield site (English Heritage 2014). The very real nature of wartime airfield activity was identified during the course of the excavation due to modern ploughing activity, with the discovery of a nonexplosive practice bomblet. In 2013 an unexploded bomb was discovered and destroyed in a controlled explosion on Dunkeswell Airfield by RNBD (Exeter Express & Echo, 2013).

The excavation identified an extensive series of sixteen pits and a ditch within Areas 1 and 3, likely to have been excavated for the extraction of iron ore nodules which are known to occur within the natural clay with flint and chert, having been previously identified on sites elsewhere within the Blackdown Hills. These features remain undated (see MDV119858).

Bluesky International, 2016, LiDAR DTM data (0.5m resolution) Blackdown Hills and East Devon AONBs: 3 transects, LIDAR ST1307; ST1206; ST1107 Bluesky International DTM 05-MAY-2016 & 27-JUN-2016 (Cartographic). SDV359714.

Areas of levelling are visible along the western edge of the airfield. Map object partly based on this source.

Ordnance Survey, 2016, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV359352.

Much of the wartime component of the airfield is depicted as structures and as earthworks on this map. These features have typically not been transcribed during this survey.

Hegarty, C. + Knight, S. + Sims, R., 2016-2018, The Blackdown Hills AONB and East Devon River Catchments National Mapping Programme Project (Interpretation). SDV359463.

The Second World War airfield of Dunkeswell, to the immediate west of the village itself, is visible as a range of structures and earthwork pit and banked features on aerial photographs of 1942 onwards. The site of Dunkeswell airfield has been transcribed according to standard NMP methodology, of which only those Second World War structures and features not depicted on the current Ordnance Survey base map and which predate 1945-1946 have been transcribed. It should, however, be borne in mind that future Ordnance Survey maps may omit previously mapped structures or elements of the airfield which may have since been demolished or reverted back to agricultural use. A number of the structures and earthworks associated with the airfield and transcribed as part of this survey have individual monument records and may have been recorded in far greater detail than can be afforded here. Given time constraints, it has not been possible to individually amend, where applicable, these individual monument records and similarly all transcriptions made here have been attributed within this general parent monument record. Much of the airfield in its original form is still extant and is depicted on the 2016 Ordnance Survey MasterMap.

The site of the Second World War airfield occupies an area of approximately 265 hectares of land on a raised level plateau, with steep sloping ground to both the east and west. The first available aerial photographs of the area date to 2nd February 1942 which show that the airfield has not yet been constructed, although constructed has clearly commenced by 11th July of that year. By August 1943, the airfield appears to have been constructed and is operational, with aircraft visible on the pens. These show the standard three runway design, with an outer perimeter track, and main concentration of buildings along the eastern edge of this track. These include, for example, hangers, flight office, operation block, workshops, air raid shelters, electricity sub-station, storehouse and latrines, to name but a few. Aircraft pens are located off the perimeter track to the southwest, west and north, with a concentration of earthwork banked features of bomb stores to the south of the airfield. A range of other structures and earthworks such as electrical sub-station, blast shelters, fuel stores, storehouses, rifle range and workshops are also dispersed across the edge of the site. Lidar images of 2016 clearly show evidence of substantial levelling prior to construction of the airfield along the western edge of the site, particularly around the aircraft pens.

Aerial photographs of 1947, two years before the airfield was closed, show that the airfield is largely unchanged, with subsequent photographs of 1950 also showing little change. By 1982, a number of structures along the eastern edge of the site have been demolished or are in an apparently ruinous state, although the fundamental fabric of the airfield remains unchanged. By 1999, aerial photographs show that a race track or go-kart track has been established to the northwest edge of the airfield and industrial units established along the eastern edge. Additional structures have been demolished here and several hut bases of former structures are visible. Digital images of 2014 show that the industrial estate has been further developed here and a business park established to the northeast, although numerous structures including hangers, stores, workshops, flight and squadron office, for example remain extant. A number of structures and earthworks also survive across the remainder of the airfield, for example the bomb stores to the south and aircraft pens to the north. The layout of the former airfield remains largely intact with runway, perimeter track and pens largely complete as areas of hardstanding.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV129541Migrated Record: 1905-6.
SDV129542Migrated Record: APH.
SDV129545Migrated Record:
SDV129546Migrated Record:
SDV129547Migrated Record:
SDV129548Migrated Record:
SDV129549Migrated Record:
SDV129550Aerial Photograph:
SDV129551Aerial Photograph:
SDV129553Migrated Record:
SDV129554Migrated Record:
SDV312951Report - Survey: Francis, P.. 1995. Blackdown Hills Airfield Survey. Dunkeswell and Upottery.. Blackdown Hills AONB. Digital + A4.
SDV321648Aerial Photograph: GetMapping. 1999 - 2000. Millennium Map 1999-2000 Getmapping. Millennium Map. Photograph (Digital).
SDV347475Report - non-specific: Francis, P.. 1997. United States Naval Amphibious Supply Base, Exeter. Airfield Research Publishing Report. Digital + A4. Appendix 1.
SDV348060Report - Assessment: Francis, P.. 1997 - 2008. United States Naval Amphibious Supply Base Exeter. ARP Report. 8. Digital. Appendix 1.
SDV352756Report - Survey: Lake, J.. 2000. Survey of Military Aviation Sites ans Structures: Summary Report: Thematic Listing Programme: English Heritage. English Heritage. A4 Comb Bound + Digital.
SDV356127Aerial Photograph: Royal Air Force. 1947. RAF/CPE/UK/1974. Royal Air Force Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). RAF/CPE/UK/1974 RS 4295-4299 11-APR-1947.
SDV357615Aerial Photograph: Royal Air Force. 1950. RAF/541/534. Royal Air Force Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). RAF/541/534 RS 4062-63 30-MAY-1950.
SDV357675Aerial Photograph: Ordnance Survey. 1982. OS/82219 V. Ordnance Survey. Photograph (Paper). OS/82219 V 1631-32 03-SEP-1982.
SDV359352Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2016. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital.
SDV359463Interpretation: Hegarty, C. + Knight, S. + Sims, R.. 2016-2018. The Blackdown Hills AONB and East Devon River Catchments National Mapping Programme Project. Historic England Research Report. Digital.
Linked documents:2
SDV359479Aerial Photograph: Next Perspectives. 2014. Aerial Photography for Great Britain. Digital. Next Perspectives APGB Imagery ST1206; ST1306; ST1207; ST1307; ST1208; ST1308; ST1408 08-SEP-2014.
SDV359565Aerial Photograph: United States Airforce. 1943. US/7PH/GP/LOC14. United States Airforce. Photograph (Paper). US/7PH/GP/LOC14 RV 6007-08 09-AUG-1943.
SDV359714Cartographic: Bluesky International. 2016. LiDAR DTM data (0.5m resolution) Blackdown Hills and East Devon AONBs: 3 transects. Not applicable. Digital. LIDAR ST1307; ST1206; ST1107 Bluesky International DTM 05-MAY-2016 & 27-JUN-2016.
SDV359770Aerial Photograph: Royal Air Force. 1942. RAF/FNO/38. Royal Air Force Aerial Photograph. Photocopy. RAF/FNO/38 RV 6003-04 11-JUL-1942.
SDV359929Aerial Photograph: Royal Air Force. 1942. RAF/16B/BR425/3. Royal Air Force Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). RAF/16B/BR425/3 V 059-060 02-FEB-1942.
SDV360371Report - Excavation: Unknown. 2015. Land at Dunkeswell Airfield, Dunkeswell: Strip, Map and Sample. Cotswold Archaeology. 14418. Digital.
SDV361967Correspondence: English Heritage. 2002. Dunkeswell Airfield, Devon - Proposals for Demolition. Letter to Defence Estates South West. Letter + Digital.
SDV361968Correspondence: English Heritage. 2002. Dunkeswell Airfield, Devon. Letter to Defence Estates South West. Letter + Digital.
SDV84920Migrated Record:

Associated Monuments

MDV56491Parent of: Air Ministry Works Building, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56478Parent of: Aircraft Compass Platform, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56519Parent of: Aircraft Maintenance Workshops, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56520Parent of: Aircraft Maintenance Workshops, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV39370Parent of: Airfield Building, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56475Parent of: Airfield Code Letters, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56523Parent of: Airfield Drains, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56494Parent of: Air-Gunnery Training Building, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56504Parent of: Annexe to Main Stores, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56470Parent of: Armoury Maintenance Building, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56487Parent of: Aviation Fuel Installation, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV39369Parent of: Battle Headquarters, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56471Parent of: Blast Shelter, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56484Parent of: Blast Shelter, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56529Parent of: Blast Shelter, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56530Parent of: Blast Shelter, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56538Parent of: Blast Shelter, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56531Parent of: Bomb Store, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56532Parent of: Bomb Store, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56493Parent of: Bombing Training Building, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56540Parent of: Building of Unknown Function, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56508Parent of: Cistern, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56516Parent of: Concrete Supports for Unknown Structure, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56474Parent of: Control Tower at RAF Dunkeswell (Building)
MDV56525Parent of: Crew Briefing Room, Dunkeswell Airfield (Building)
MDV56496Parent of: Crew Rest-Room, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56498Parent of: Crew Rest-Room, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56518Parent of: Dunkeswell Post Office (Monument)
MDV56480Parent of: Electrical Sub-Station, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56511Parent of: Electrical Sub-Station, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56522Parent of: Electrical Sub-Station, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV76748Parent of: Extraction Pit and Building, Winkleigh Airfield Waterworks (Monument)
MDV56473Parent of: Fire Tender Shelter, Dunkeswell Airfield (Building)
MDV56490Parent of: Fire Tender Shelter, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV45301Parent of: Firing Range, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56509Parent of: Flight Office, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV57227Parent of: Floodlight Trailer and Tractor Shed, Dunkeswell Airfield (Building)
MDV56536Parent of: Fusing Point Building, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56537Parent of: Fusing Point Building, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56505Parent of: Gas Chamber, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56499Parent of: Gas Clothing and Respirator Stores, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV114140Parent of: Guard House adjacent to the Operations Block, Dunkeswell Airfield (Building)
MDV56489Parent of: Guardhouse Extension, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56533Parent of: Incendiary Bomb Store, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV78748Parent of: Incendiary Bomb Store, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56472Parent of: Latrine, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56483Parent of: Latrine, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56485Parent of: Latrine, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56503Parent of: Latrine, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56528Parent of: Latrines, Dunkeswell Airfield (Building)
MDV56492Parent of: Link Trainer Hut, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56506Parent of: Main Stores, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56507Parent of: Main Workshops, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56502Parent of: Motor Transport Shed, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56500Parent of: Motor Transport Workshops, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56526Parent of: Office Annexe, Dunkeswell Airfield (Building)
MDV56527Parent of: Operations Block, Dunkeswell Airfield (Building)
MDV56479Parent of: Personnel Shelter, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV80315Parent of: Personnel Shelter, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56495Parent of: Photographic Block, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56534Parent of: Pyro Stores, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56535Parent of: Pyro Stores, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56486Parent of: Radar Workshop, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56469Parent of: RAF Regiment Barracks, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56476Parent of: Signal Square, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56482Parent of: Sleeve Streamer Mast, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56514Parent of: Small-Arms Ammunition Store, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56515Parent of: Small-Arms Ammunition Workshop, Dunkeswell Airfield (Building)
MDV56512Parent of: Small-Arms Ammuntion Store, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56513Parent of: Small-Arms Ammuntion Store, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56481Parent of: Special Purpose Building, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56510Parent of: Squadron Office, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56501Parent of: Station Armoury, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56524Parent of: Station Offices, Dunkeswell Airfield (Building)
MDV78744Parent of: Storage Buildings, Dunkelswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56517Parent of: T2 Hangar, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56521Parent of: T2 Hangar, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56497Parent of: Vehicle Park and Loading Ramp, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV56543Related to: Commanding Officer's Quarters and Officers' Mess, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV45093Related to: Dispersed Accommodation Site 2, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV78754Related to: Dispersed Accommodation Site 3, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV45103Related to: Dispersed Accommodation Site 4 (WAAF), Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV45094Related to: Dispersed Accommodation Site, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV45095Related to: Dispersed Accommodation Site, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV45097Related to: Dispersed Accommodation Site, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV45100Related to: Dispersed Accommodation Site, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV45102Related to: Dispersed Site 5 (Sick Quarters), Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV45101Related to: Dunkeswell Airfield Dispersed Site 11 (Monument)
MDV78751Related to: Garage, Dunkeswell Airfield High Frequency Transmitting Station (Monument)
MDV78752Related to: Handcraft Hut, Dunkeswell Airfield High Frequency Transmitting Site (Monument)
MDV78750Related to: High Frequency Transmitting Site, Dunkeswell Airfield (Monument)
MDV117956Related to: Military trackways, southeast of Dunkeswell airfield, Dunkeswell (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV6614 - Magnetometer Survey Report, Dunkeswell Airfield, Dunkeswell (Ref: 510)
  • EDV4928 - Site Visit to the Control Tower at RAF Dunkeswell
  • EDV4948 - Blackdown Hills Airfield Survey
  • EDV5129 - Archaeological Recording of a World War II Personnel Shelter
  • EDV5155 - Archaeological Evaluation at Dunkeswell Air Centre
  • EDV5772 - Negative Observation
  • EDV5869 - Watching Brief, Land Adjacent to Hanger 2, Dunkeswell Industrial Estate (Ref: ACD288)
  • EDV5889 - Land to the South of Taxi-way, Dunkeswell Airfield, Dunkeswell; Results of an Archaeological Watching Brief (Ref: ACD492/1/0)
  • EDV6334 - Trench Evaluation, Land at Dunkeswell Aerodrome, Dunkeswell, East Devon (Ref: ACD778/2/0)
  • EDV6531 - Watching Brief, Dunkeswell Aircraft Storage Sheds, Dunkeswell Airfield (Ref: ACD904/2/1)
  • EDV7009 - Monitoring and Recording, New Aircraft Storage Shed, Dunkeswell Airfield (Ref: ACD1387/2/0)
  • EDV7359 - Strip, Map and Sample: Land at Dunkeswell Airfield, Dunkeswell (Ref: 14418)
  • EDV7508 - The Blackdown Hills AONB and East Devon River Catchments National Mapping Programme (NMP) project (Ref: ACD1228)
  • EDV8104 - Watching Brief: Aircraft Storage Shed, Dunkeswell Airfield (Ref: ACD2012/2/1)

Date Last Edited:Sep 23 2019 3:53PM