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HER Number:MDV5451
Name:Buckland Abbey

Summary

Buckland Abbey was founded in 1278 and converted into a dwelling in the 16th century when many buildings were destroyed. In 1581 ownership passed to Sir Francis Drake in whose family it remained until 1946. Now owned by the National Trust.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 487 668
Map Sheet:SX46NE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishBuckland Monachorum
DistrictWest Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishBUCKLAND MONACHORUM

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • National Monuments Record: 437786
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX46NE/501
  • Old Listed Building Ref (I): 92635
  • Old SAM County Ref: 246
  • Old SAM Ref: 24846
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division: SX46NE9

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • ABBEY (XII to XVI - 1200 AD to 1600 AD (Between))

Full description

National Monuments Record, SX4868 (Aerial Photograph). SDV241987.


Unknown, Unknown, 338 (Article in Serial). SDV242000.


Swete, R. J. (Revd), 1792-1801, 564M 'Picturesque Sketches of Devon' by Reverend John Swete, 564M/4/181,185 (Record Office Collection). SDV337942.

Illustrations of Buckland Abbey by Swete.


Birch, W de G., 1870, On the Date of Foundation Ascribed to the Cistertian Abbeys in Great Britain, 298, 366 (Article in Serial). SDV241947.

The West Wing, originally the nave of the church, has been restored since the fire of June 1938. The wing now consists of three big rooms, one above the other. To be noted is the south arch beneath the central tower with well moulded capitals and bases to the cylindrical shafts of the piers. Attached to the capitals of the arch on the south sides are the springers of the original south transept roof. The arch is now filled with a stone wall with modern windows of 16th century type. The head of the west arch has been reinforced with a massive concrete soffit moulding of square section. In the head of the north tower is the Drake Fireplace in the Tower Room. In the bell room over this last are traces, east and west, of narrow passages through the walls to admit to the roofs. The curious wavy parapet of the tower originally had a ball on each merlon. The fine hall beneath the tower escaped damage. The fireplace, dated 1576, has a fireback dated 1671. To the north-east a rectangular chapel or oratory contains the remains of a sedilia with traces of lierne-vaulted canopies and intermediate shafts of beerstone, three aumbries, two altars, and some old tiles brought from soissons. Some pieces of worked stone and a keeled mortar of Roborough Downelvan have been adapted as a pillar stoup. The ante-room to the so-called Lady Chapel, in which are preserved some bones exhumed from beneath the nave floor in 1938, has an interesting vaulted roof springing from angle shafts with carved bases and capitals south-east. The south transept seems to have been an eastern aisle, as it still retains traces of an east arcade of two bays. The panelling of the drawing room has been re-erected. Here and in the dining room are two four-centred fireplaces with the grenville charge in the spandrels. There are also four small fireplaces brought from Nutwell Court and made of gunmetal derived from Gibraltar guns. Notable features: the head of a fine old east window now in the Tower Room, where it rests on a 17th century wooden door-frame; three heraldic shields on the north porch among whose charges may be detected the Red Hand of Ulster; the noble Tithe Barn with its threshing floor; an octagonal quern in the grounds, its orifice surrounded by a human mask. Remains of Cistercian Abbey. Birch records evidence for Cistercian Foundation of abbey in 1278.


Brooking Rowe, J., 1875, The Cistercian Houses of Devon, Part 1: Buckland Abbey, 343-359 (Article in Serial). SDV241950.

Description of the Abbey and Abbey Church, with plates. Bounds of the Abbey and of the Manor of Cullumpton from the Deed of Amicia, Countess of Devon. Bounds of Abbey's possessions from Charter of Isabella de Fortibus, with metes and bounds.


Brooking Rowe, J., 1876, The Cistercian Houses of Devon, Part II: Buckland Abbey, Concluded, 797-808 (Article in Serial). SDV241992.


Ordnance Survey, 1907, 111SE (Cartographic). SDV242025.


Seaton, Lady, 1927, Proceedings of the Congress of the British Archaeological Association at Exeter, 24-25 (Article in Serial). SDV241948.

Buckland Abbey founded in 1278 by Amicia, Countess of Devon and colonised by Monks from Quarr Abbey, Isle of Wight. After the dissolution Henry VIII gave it to Sir Richard Grenville who converted the abbey into a dwelling and destroyed greater part of buildings. In 1581 ownership went to Sir Francis Drake in whose family it has remained since.


Beckerlegge, J. J., 1941, 10th Report of the Plymouth and District Branch, 119-120 (Article in Serial). SDV241984.


Ministry of Works, 1950, Buckland Abbey (Schedule Document). SDV344043.

buckland Abbey was a Cistercian house: founded 1280, dissolved 1538, converted into a mansion by Sir Richard Grenville 1576-7. Acquired by Sir Fancis Drake in 1581. Further altertion in late 18th century. Visible Medieval remains consist of: the nave, chancel, crossing, central tower of church, shorn of transepts and aisles, and converted into a house, including a fine hall on the ground floor of the crossing, and vestibule east of the former north transept, created out of a vaulted chapel. Good ceiling and panelling in hall; small but good 16th century gatehouse tower; fine tithe barn, with row of outbuildings, adjoining (16th century). Other details: Monument 246.


Cambridge University Collection, 1950, CUC/FK, 64-70 (Aerial Photograph). SDV241997.


Knowles, D. + St. Joseph, J. K., 1952, Monastic Sites from the Air, 146-147 (Monograph). SDV241952.

Good Cambridge University Collection aerial photograph taken from north. Other details: Photo.


Copeland, G. W., 1953, Buckland Abbey: An Architectural Survey (Report - Survey). SDV242010.


Copeland, G. W., 1953, Some Problems of Buckland Abbey, 41-52 (Article in Serial). SDV242009.


Hoskins, W. G., 1954, A New Survey of England: Devon, 356-357 (Monograph). SDV17562.


French, K. + French, C., 1957, Devonshire Plasterwork, 127 (Article in Serial). SDV4676.


Department of Environment, 1960, Tavistock RD, 7 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV239444.


Stephan, J., 1963, Presidential Address: Devon Cistercians in English Literature, 26 (Article in Serial). SDV241993.


Knowles, D. + Hadcock, R. N., 1971, Medieval Religious Houses: England and Wales, 112, 116 (Monograph). SDV323253.

Buckland Abbey. Abbey of St. Mary the Virgin, called Locus S. Benedicti, founded by Amicia, Countess of Devon for monks from Quarr in 1278. The Abbey was suppressed in 1539.


Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, 1977, SX46NE9 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV346288.

Remains of Cistercian abbey founded in 1278.


Higham, R. A., 1979, The Castles of Medieval Devon, 179 (Post-Graduate Thesis). SDV336189.

Buckland Abbey received a licence to crenellate in 1337.


Youings, J., 1980, Drake, Grenville and Buckland Abbey, 95-99 (Article in Serial). SDV241949.

Since 1541, the estate had belonged to the Grenvilles of Stowe, North Cornwall. The property did not pass directly to Drake, but via John Hele of Plymouth, and Christopher Harris of Plymstock. Plymouth purchased some deeds relating to Drake's title to the abbey, ranging from 1580 to 1583. One is a grant by letters patent from Queen Elizabeth, licensing Grenville and his wife, Mary, to dispose of the abbey to Hele and Harris for a sum of 3400 pounds sterling. Buckland was mortgaged as security for a loan to Grenville for three years. Grenville had been adventuring in the local land market and in the conversion of Buckland, and now probably needed ready cash badly. Drake's 3400 pounds sterling was a very good cash offer. Drake took formal possession on 14th November 1582, and now seemed minded to keep the property, but whether with or without Grenville's willing acquiescence there is no way of discovering. The deal over Buckland was advantageous to both.


Coulson, C., 1982, Hierarchism in Conventual Crenellation: An Essay in the Sociology of Medieval Fortifications, 69-100 (Article in Serial). SDV241960.

Licence to crenellate 'dwelling place and church' granted October 1337. Income circa 1535 was 241 pounds sterling.


Weston, S., 1983, List of Field Monument Warden Visits 1983 (Un-published). SDV343247.


Allan, J. P. + Keen, L., 1983, Medieval Floor Tiles in Exeter Museum, 135-7 (Article in Serial). SDV123604.

Medieval floor tiles from Buckland Abbey are discussed in Allan and Keen.


Timms, S. C., 1984, Buckland Abbey (Personal Comment). SDV241959.

National Trust are considering large-scale proposals for enhancing Buckland Abbey. Survey work has been carried out by D. Thackray and Mr Barber. Building recording has been undertaken by Thackray, Barber and Plymouth Polytechnic. A small part of the presumed north claustral range was exposed in a garden by S. Brown in 1983 and further limited excavation is likely in 1984.


Barber, B., 1984, Buckland Abbey (Undergraduate Dissertation). SDV242021.


Griffith, F. M., 1984, DAP/CV, 13 (Aerial Photograph). SDV233132.


Pye, A., 1985, Buckland Abbey Excavations (Cider House) 1984. A Summary (Report - Excavation). SDV241962.

The Abbey is situated on a north facing slope of a tributary valley of the Tavy. Of the original monastic buildings only the church, 15th century Tithe Barn and so called infirmary survive. The cloisters were probably situated on the north side of the church, not the usual south side, owing to space and slope. Buck's 1734 drawing of the abbey shows a range running north from the north transept, also detected by resistivity survey which probably represents the now demolished eastern claustral range. The presence of the north range and associated buildings is probably attested by medieval elements within the wall that divides the church grounds from the Cider House Garden, excavated evidence for buildings on the north side of this wall in the Cider House Garden and yard of Tower Cottage, and by medieval elements in the Cider House and Tower Cottage themselves.


Department of Environment, 1985, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241953.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for clearance of vegetation.


Gaskell-Brown, C., 1986 - 1987, Buckland Abbey, Devon (Report - Survey). SDV242027.

Founded by Amicia, Countess of Devon and established circa 1278 by Monks from Quarr Abbey on the Isle of Wight. At the dissolution in 1539 the Abbey had 13 monks. At first leased to George Pollard, the Abbey and desmesne farm was then sold to Richard Greville whose grandson completed its conversion to a Tudor mansion. The property was sold to Francis Drank in 1581. Now owned by the National Trust. Only the church, the boundary wall to the north of the church, Tower Cottage and the cider house remain to represent the conventual buildings. In addition two substantially complete buildings, the Tithe Barn and the 'Guest House' survive from the desmesne farm.
An area of earthworks in the 'Old Orchard' may represent monastic modifications to the stream for fishponds or industrial use. However, some of the earthworks may well represent an 18th century irrigation system. Earthwork platforms adjacent to the car park may represent a gatehouse.


Unknown, 1986 - 1987, Devon Religious Houses Survey (Un-published). SDV347681.


Devon Religious Houses Survey, 1986/87, Devon Religious Houses Survey 1986/87. Preliminary Assessment Form. Buckland (Un-published). SDV358417.

Preliminary assessment form listing architectural remains, potential for buried deposits, previous research, aerial photos, modern use and survey potential.


Department of Environment, 1987, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241954.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for roof, floor and window repairs to 'Monks Guest House'. Also for the removal of the upper part of recent extension.


Department of Environment, 1987, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241955.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for insertion of public footpath, associated planting and rerouting of the farm lane.


Bettley, T., 1988, Buckland Abbey Guesthouse Report (Report - non-specific). SDV242023.


Griffith, F. M., 1988, DAP/JV, 2-5 (Aerial Photograph). SDV242037.


Higham, R. A., 1988, Devon Castles: An Annotated List, 144 (Article in Serial). SDV341278.


Department of Environment, 1988, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241956.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for laying of new drain.


Cherry, B. + Pevsner, N., 1989, The Buildings of England: Devon, 227-30 (Monograph). SDV325629.


Department of National Heritage, 1992, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241963.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for excavation of a trench and ground boring for lightning conductor installation.


Watts, M. A., 1993, Archaeological Recording at Buckland Abbey, Yelverton, 1993 (Report - non-specific). SDV241972.

Two parallel walls (551 and 552) revealed during drainage works in 1993 are interpreted as representing the foundations of the Medieval west end of the nave, which is thought to have extended a further 10 metres west of the present building. The nave was probably shortened shortly after the dissolution. Walls 507 and 508, to the north of the church, probably represent the remains of the north wall of the north transept and the south end of the east claustral range respectively.


Department of National Heritage, 1993, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241964.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for excavation of trenches and installation of water draining system below ground surface, and provision of electric and water supply to a new sewage treatment plant.


Gibbons, P., 1994, 134699 (Un-published). SDV241967.

Upstanding and buried remains of an abbey of the Cistercian Order in occupation from c1278 until 1539. The Abbey conforms to the traditional monastic plan in which a church and 3 ranges of buildings were grouped around the central open square court of the cloister, with ancillary buildings farther from the nucleus. The visible remains exist as a number of adapted structures, consisting of substantial parts of the Abbey Church incorporated into a later mansion, part of the cloister, a barn, a farm building (guesthouse), part of the Abbot's lodgings incorporated into a later structure, part of a precinct wall, and 2 main areas of earthworks. The buried remains are extensive and include the claustral ranges, graveyard, a gatehouse, buildings forming the home farm, and the water management system. Walls are constructed of random rubble shillet, with the moulded stone and most quoins in granite. In general the buildings were terraced into the higher ground to the south-east. The Abbey Church is of late 13th - early 14th century date, of cruciform plan, aligned east-north-east/west-south-west. The most substantial remains are those of the tower over the crossing which forms the focal point of the later mansion and survives to height of over 18 metres beneath a modified parapet. The tower retains the moulded piers and arches of the crossing incorporated into its walls. Those of the nave, chancel and north transept are visible within the mansion, and those of the south transept form a decorative feature in the external wall face. The chasing of the high pitched roof lines of the transepts are visible in the wall faces. The walls of the nave and presbytery exist almost to roof height with the remains of some window arches and windows incorporated into the later structure. The transepts were each of 2 bays, aisled on their east sides to contain two chapels. In the south chapel of the north transept the ribbed vaulted ceiling remains intact. The existing remains of the church are about 37.6 metres in length, with a width across the transepts of 28 metres. The nave and presbytery were 10.1 metres in width, and were apparently unaisled. The presbytery had 2 bays, and retains the remains of the east window, with the springing for the vaulted ceiling visible on the second floor of the mansion. The area of the high altar was excavated early in the 20th century. The length of the existing nave is 17.9 metres, with 4 bays, although the dimensions of the cloister indicate that the original nave was longer by 2 or 3 bays. Founded circa 1278 by Amicia, following her grant to the Cistercian Order of the adjoining Manors of Buckland, Bickleigh and Walkhampton, together with the East Devon Manor of Cullompton. The Abbey was colonised by monks from Quarr Abbey, and dedicated to St. Benedict. Buckland was the last rural Cistercian Foundations in England and owned a substantial tract of land in south-west Devon. The Cistercian Order was in general inclined towards the pioneer cultivation of remote areas of waste or difficult land, and managed its lands through the creation of grange farms. The registers of the Bishops of Exeter attribute 5 granges to Buckland in addition to the home farm. The registers refer to the grant of a market and fair at Buckland and Cullompton in 1318, and the impoverishment of the Abbey following the Black Death in 1349. They state that in 1337 Edward III granted the Abbey a licence to crenellate, and in 1522 refer to the existence of a west gate furnished with an upper room. At the dissolution there was an abbot and 12 monks in residence. The Abbey was dissolved in 1539. The inventory includes (in addition to the church and claustral ranges), houses, buildings, barns, tenements, burial ground, pools etc. , within and near to the precinct. Following disposal by the crown, parts of the buildings, usually those of a more domestic nature, were converted to habitable use by the new owners. At Buckland, however, it was the Abbey Church itself that was converted into a substantial dwelling. Excavations were undertaken within the Abbey Church in the early 20the century when the ground floor room within the presbytery was converted into a chapel. A tiled floor and the tiled plinth of the high altar were revealed. In 1983 the earthworks to the east and west of the site were surveyed. In 1986 an analysis of the standing structure of the church and mansion was undertaken. In 1993 recording and excavations were undertaken in connection with a series of trenches cut around the Abbey Church to improve drainage. The mansion and barn are each listed at Grade I, the guest house at Grade II*, the Cider House, Tower House and garden wall are each listed at Grade II. Six other structures of Post Medieval date are listed at Grade II. Other details: MPP AI 134699.


Nenk, B. S. + Margeson, S. + Hurley, M., 1994, Medieval Britain and Ireland 1993, 202 (Article in Serial). SDV12910.


Department of National Heritage, 1994, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241965.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for excavation below ground drain to a septic tank and installation of water ducts and electricity supplies.


Department of National Heritage, 1994, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241966.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for capping repair/reinstatement of garden wall, removal and rebuilding tower crenellations, lightning conductor installation to roofs and below Abbey ground and Great Barn, repair to Great Barn louvred roof vent and installation of new finial.


Gaskell-Brown, C., 1995, Buckland Abbey, Devon:Surveys and Excavations, 1983-1995, 25-82 (Article in Serial). SDV242033.


Department of National Heritage, 1996, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241973.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted concerning the removal of a disused wooden door and frame, followed by the blocking up of the opening to match the existing wall.


Department of National Heritage, 1996, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241974.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for installation of a decorative plaster ceiling in the Drake Chamber of Buckland Abbey.


Department of National Heritage, 1997, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241975.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for the replacement of a part of the glazing in a 20th century window on the top floor at the west end of the abbey with a stained glass panel.


Reed, S. J., 1998, Archaeological Evaluation and Recording at Buckland Abbey, Yelverton, 1998 (Report - Evaluation). SDV232723.

Archaeological evaluation and recording undertaken on behalf of National Trust. Three evaluation trenches excavated to determine nature and extent of surviving archaeological deposits in areas of proposed features of 'Elizabethan Garden' to be constructed to the north-east of the former Abbey Church. Part of previously unknown Medieval building was uncovered in trench 1. In trench 2, a metalled surface, remnants of flagstone surface and burnt surface were uncovered. The burnt surface was defined by shallow ditches, associated with two heavily burnt hearths. Overlain by charcoal rich occupation layer containing pottery from the 11th to the 14th centuries. To the west of the burnt surface, on the north side of trench, were the remains of flagstone floor defined by low remains of stone wall. To the west of this was metalled surface. This was possibly the remains of timber framed building/workshop, or walled area of unspecified industrial purpose. In trench 3 a low bank represents a possible 18th century or later garden feature, constructed over an earlier garden surface. The excavation of a pipe trench from the east wall of the chapel into the Monks' Garden was also monitored by Exeter Archaeology. No archaeological features were observed and no finds recovered. Excavations through the wall of the Abbey Church showed it to have been built on an upstand of bedrock, the wall having battered footings, with the face of the wall sloping outwards below ground level.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 1998, Buckland Abbey (Schedule Document). SDV344044.

The monument includes much of the surviving remains of Buckland Abbey which are situated between the village of Buckland Monachorum and the hamlet of Milton Combe on the eastern side of the valley of the River Tavy some six kilometers above its confluence with the Tamar. It lies within a small sheltered cleave on the south side of a small tributary stream of the Tavy, on ground sloping down to the north-west. The monument includes the upstanding and buried remains of an abbey of the Cistercian Order in occupation from circa 1278 until 1539. The abbey conforms to the traditional monastic plan in which a church and three ranges of buildings were grouped around the central open square court of the cloister, with ancillary buildings farther from the nucleus. The visible remains exist as a number of adapted structures, consisting of substantial parts of the abbey church incorporated into a later mansion, part of the cloister, a barn, a farm building (guesthouse), part of the abbot's lodgings incorporated into a later structure, part of a precinct wall, and two main areas of earthworks. The buried remains are extensive and include the claustral ranges, graveyard, a gatehouse, buildings forming the home farm, and the water management system. The walls are constructed of random rubble utilising shillet, with the moulded stone and most quoins in granite. In general the buildings were terraced into the higher ground to the south east. The abbey church is of late 13th-early 14th century date, of cruciform plan, aligned east-north-east to west-south-west. The most substantial remains are those of the tower over the crossing which forms the focal point of the later mansion and survives to a height of over 18 metres beneath a modified parapet. The tower retains the moulded piers and arches of the crossing incorporated into its walls. Those of the nave, chancel and north transept are visible within the mansion, and those of the south transept form a decorative feature in the external wall face. The chasing of the high pitched roof lines of the transepts are visible in the wall faces. The walls of the nave and presbytery exist almost to roof height with the remains of some window arches and windows incorporated into the later structure. The transepts were each of two bays, aisled on their east sides to contain two chapels. In the southern chapel of the north transept the ribbed vaulted ceiling remains intact. The existing remains of the church are about 37.6 metres in length, with a width across the transepts of 28 metres. The nave and presbytery were 10.1 metres in width, and were apparently unaisled. The presbytery had two bays, and retains the remains of the east window, with the springing for the vaulted ceiling visible on the second floor of the mansion. The area of the high altar was excavated early in the 20th century. The length of the existing nave is 17.9 metres, with four bays, although the dimensions of the cloister indicate that the original nave may have been longer by two or three bays. The monastic graveyard was sited to the south-west of the abbey church; five burials were revealed in this area in 1993 during work to improve drainage. The cloister stood to the north of the church and was about 30 metres square, terraced into the natural ground slope. The south wall of the north range of the cloister acted as a retaining wall and has been incorporated into the later property boundary. The Medieval wall is some 30 metres in length and stands to a height of 3.3 metres. The 16 metre length forming the eastern half includes five blocked windows with wide splays on the inside. The north face of this section has an inset for a floor below the windows, and beneath that includes sections of six arches. It appears that due to the ground slope, access into this range from the cloister would have been, unusually, at first floor level. Excavations in 1984 on the north side of the west end of the wall revealed a complex sequence of medieval activity in the form of floor levels and wall footings. The north range would have contained the refectory (dining hall) and kitchens. In the traditional Cistercian layout the refectory was positioned with its long axis at right-angles to the north range so that it would have projected from the cloister. Some 20 metres north of the existing wall of the cloister is the Cider House, an extensively modernised dwelling which includes some Medieval features in its southern end. The position of this building suggests that it probably incorporates the northern end of the refectory. To the east of the Cider House stands a modernised building incorporating part of the abbot's lodgings in the form of a three storeyed tower of 15th century date, known as Tower House. This building is illustrated in an engraving dated 1734. The tower appears to have formed the north-east corner of a larger building. It has angled buttresses on its outer corners and another buttress on the north side. At second floor level the north and east faces are framed in unique decorative friezes that include small flowers. The tower has a pentagonal stair turret projecting from the south side and extending above the embattled roof to form a turret. The ground floor is set into the rising ground to the south-east. It has a blocked door on the north side and, internally, a blocked arch leading eastward into an underground space of unknown extent. Access to the tower and stair is now gained from the stables adjoining the east side of the tower. Some 20 metres to the east of the church stands the monastic Great Barn, a complete, free-standing rectangular structure of early 14th century date, with some later modifications, measuring 50 metres by 19 metres overall. It is buttressed all around, has slit windows splayed internally with rounded arches, and a wooden roof of 20 bays, now slate covered. In the centres of its longest sides there are substantial external porches, with doors set in large pointed arches in moulded stone matching those of the church. Both porches have an upper floor. Some 20 metres to the east of the barn stands a farm building (guesthouse), a complete, free-standing rectangular structure of early 14th century date, with many later modifications, measuring 33.4 metres by 7.4 metres overall. The building is two storeyed and slopes downwards markedly from east to west. The ground level on its south side has been raised so that access on that side is now at first floor level. Excavations and an analysis of the standing structure in 1987 revealed that the building was intended for storage and housing animals, with an upper floor only at each end and the central bays open to the roof. In the mid-15th century the west end of the building was converted into accommodation through the addition of an internal dividing wall, a fireplace and larger windows. An essential part of the design of all abbeys was the provision of a supply of fresh running water. At Buckland the main water source was the stream to the north of the claustral ranges. The stream feeds a small pond which is retained by an earth dam and held within vertical stone rubble retaining walls of some 2 metres depth. Water from the dam is then culverted in the area where the kitchens and reredorter buildings (latrines) were situated. The land forming the monastic precinct was traditionally enclosed behind a wall, and contained, in addition to the nucleus of the church and cloister, all the buildings and structures, both agricultural and industrial, associated with the degree of self sufficiency that the abbey was capable of sustaining. At Buckland part of the line of the precinct has been identified with two short lengths of walling. Adjacent to the south-east corner of the barn there is a substantial wall some 10 metres in length and 4.5 metres high which includes two slit windows, internally splayed with round headed arches. There is an inset beneath the windows that probably indicates a floor level. A longer section of walling survives to the east of the Linhay, it has four slit windows of identical design, but no inset. Both sections of wall contain putlog (scaffolding) holes. In a field in the valley to the west of the abbey there are extensive low earthworks associated with the stream which include terraced areas, the site of a large pond retained by a dam, and drainage channels with stone revetted sections of their banks. The southern edge of the field is bounded by a track leading to the river. To the east of the abbey, a field contains earthworks in the form of terraced areas and a linear bank, and archaeological excavations in this area in 1987 revealed Medieval and Iron Age activity. To the north east of the abbey church the rising ground contains three quarries from which shillet (Upper Devonian slate) was derived in the construction of the abbey. The western quarry is the lowest; it is roughly circular, some 30 metres across, with a flat floor, and a vertical face of some 6 metres height to the north, sloping down on both sides to a wide entrance to the south-west. Small areas of exposed bedrock remain visible in the north and west faces. The middle quarry is elongated, of some 40 metres length and 20 metres width, and is at its greatest depth of some 6 metres to the north, sloping down on both sides to ground level to the south-west. A small area of bedrock remains visible in the lower part of the west face. The floor is uneven, sloping up to the north, with substantial spoil tips at the entrance to the south west. The east quarry is the highest and smallest, defined by a vertical rockface forming its northern limit. The quarry face is about 16 metres across and 3.5 metres high, and consists, in plan, of two clearly defined rectangular cuts, the east cut being deeper and extending farther north. The floor of the west cut is obscured by spoil tips. Beyond the spoil tips the southern extent of the quarry is obscured; a visible depression further down the slope may be the course of a hollow way. The abbey was founded in circa 1278 by Amicia, Countess of Devon following her grant to the Cistercian Order of the adjoining manors of Buckland, Bickleigh and Walkhampton, together with the east Devon manor of Cullompton. The abbey was colonised by monks from Quarr Abbey in the Isle of Wight, and dedicated to St Benedict. Buckland was the last rural Cistercian foundation in England and owned a substantial tract of land in south-west Devon. The episcopal registers of the bishops of Exeter attribute five granges to Buckland in addition to the home farm at the abbey. The registers refer to the grant of a market and fair at Buckland and Cullompton in 1318, and the impoverishment of the abbey following the Black Death in 1349. They state that in 1337 Edward III granted the abbey a licence to crenellate, and in 1522 refer to the existence of a west gate furnished with an upper room. The registers also give an insight into a number of local disputes. At the dissolution there was an abbot and 12 monks in residence. The Abbey was dissolved in 1539 when the largest and wealthiest religious houses were surrendered to Henry VIII. The inventory of the property includes (in addition to the church and claustral ranges), houses, buildings, barns, tenements, burial ground and pools, within and near to the precinct. A condition of the subsequent sale of these sites was that the buildings were to be rendered unfit for monastic use, and this was greatly assisted by the crowns sequestration of the roofing lead. In 1539 the abbey and home farm were leased to George Pollard and in 1541 sold by the Crown to the Grenville family. The inventory of the sale includes a list of the fields adjoining the abbey in which `Quarry Park' is named, and this field is referred to again in relation to two small meadows said to lie adjacent to it. By 1576 Sir Richard Grenville had completed the conversion of the church into an Elizabethan mansion. The west end of the nave was shortened by two or three bays and converted into a great hall with a large fireplace, panelling and decorative plasterwork, and a screens passage at the east end in the crossing of the church. Both transepts were removed, although three of the side chapels were retained, and the church tower remained standing to its full height. A staircase was added to the west of the south transept leading to two floors of apartments above the hall. A service wing was added, extending southwards from the south side of the presbytery, and this contained a kitchen with two large fireplaces and four charcoal burning ovens. The serving area occupied the former presbytery. The service wing also contained two upper floors of apartments. In 1581 the property was sold to Sir Francis Drake and remained with that family until 1946. In the later 18th century a staircase was inserted in the service wing and the windows throughout the house replaced in gothic styling. An engraving of 1734 shows the mansion with the north transept of the church intact and abutted by a series of roofed structures standing on the alignment of the east claustral range of the abbey. These structures remained standing until 1769. In the early 19th century an excavation was undertaken in the former presbytery which revealed the base of the high altar; this area was subsequently converted into a chapel. In 1938 the two upper floors of the west wing were severly damaged by fire and were extensively restored. In 1949 the house was given to the National Trust. The mansion and Great Barn are Listed Grade I, the guesthouse Listed Grade II*, the Cider House, Tower House and garden wall are each Listed Grade II. Two sets of gate piers, the Linhay, Calf Pens, kitchen garden wall, cart shed and Place Barton House, all structures of post medieval date, are Listed Grade II. A number of features are excluded from the scheduling; these are the mansion, the Great Barn, Place Barton House, the Calf Pens, the Cart Shed, the Linhay, the Cider House, and the northern part of Tower House (which is in use as a residence, known as Tower Cottage), the lean-to stable and shed which abut Tower House, all free-standing Post Medieval structures, all Post Medieval garden walls, road surfaces, driveways, and paths, all fence and gate posts, and the cottages associated with the Cider House are excluded; although the ground beneath all of these features is included. The farm building (Monk's guesthouse) and the ground beneath it which has been totally excavated are totally excluded from the scheduling. Other details: Monument 24846.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 1998, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241977.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted concerning the excavation of 3 archaeological evaluation trenches in advance of proposed Elizabethan Garden.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 1998, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241978.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for the excavation of trenches and the installation of below ground ducting to reduce radon levels.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 1999, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241979.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted in respect of proposed works concerning the creation of a new formal garden to the north-east of the Abbey Church.


Nicholas Pearson Associates, 2001, Buckland Abbey: Historic Survey and Restoration Plan, 19 (Report - Survey). SDV241983.

The abbey wall is Medieval with 20th century pointing. Bell Court to the south of the abbey is Medieval with circa 1800 pitching.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2002, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV241982.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted, subject to conditions, for works concerning the installation of exhibition display facilities.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2005, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV322630.

Schenduled Monument Consent granted for works concerning landscaping, including the installation of a terraced garden.


Berry, N., 2006, Buckland Abbey, Devon: Desk Top Survey of Quarries Within Scheduled Monument, 1 (Report - Assessment). SDV347351.

Included within the Scheduled Area of Buckland Abbey are three quarries, cut into higher ground to the north of the buildings. It is believed that the quarries were the major sources of shillet, a form of slate used for the construction of the Abbey. Other details: Maps and plans.


Robinson, D. M. + Harrison, S., 2006, Cistercian Cloisters in England and Wales. Part 1, 170 (Article in Serial). SDV361751.

Buckland (Devon) 1278 - 1539. Summary: north; form of garth unknown; no information on arcades (citing Robinson, Cistercian Abbeys of Britain, 76-78).


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2006, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV336004.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted, subject to conditions, in respect of proposed works concerning removal of work buildings within area known as Quarry.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2006, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV336252.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted, subject to conditions, for proposed works concerning the installation and routing of combined telephone and IT cable from the Property Office in the Mansion to the Monk's Guesthouse and the Oxshed.


Allan, J., 2006, The Excavation of a Brewhouse at Buckland Abbey in 2005, 241-265 (Article in Serial). SDV344668.

Excavation in the courtyard beside the cider house revealed the remains of a structure identified as a brewhouse which was demolished circa 1770.


English Heritage, 2009, Buckland Abbey (Correspondence). SDV344045.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted, subject to conditions, in respect of proposed works concerning the construction of a concrete base to secure a wooden shed for volunteer shelter and erection of a wooden shed/shelter.


National Monuments Record, 2011, 437786 (National Monuments Record Database). SDV346289.

The surviving remains of Buckland Abbey which are situated between the village of Buckland Monachorum and the hamlet of Milton Combe. The monument includes the upstanding and buried remains of an abbey of the Cistercian Order. The abbey was founded in 1278 by Amicia, Countess of Devon and was colonised by monks from Quarr Abbey in the Isle of Wight, and dedicated to St Benedict. Following its dissolution in 1539 the abbey and home farm were sold in 1541 to the Grenville family. By 1576 Sir Richard Grenville had completed the conversion of the church into an Elizabethan mansion. In 1581 the property was sold to Sir Francis Drake and remained with that family until 1946. In 1949 the house was given to the National Trust and is now principally in use as a museum. The abbey conforms to the traditional monastic plan in which a church and three ranges of buildings are grouped around the cloister, with ancillary buildings further from the nucleus. The visible remains exist as a number of adapted structures, consisting of substantial parts of the abbey church incorporated into a later mansion, part of the cloister, a barn, a farm building (guesthouse), part of the abbot's lodgings incorporated into a later structure, part of the precinct wall, and two main areas of earthworks. The buried remains are extensive and include the claustral ranges, graveyard, a gatehouse, buildings forming the home farm, and the water management system.


English Heritage, 2011, Historic Houses Register (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV346128.

Buckland Abbey was Listed on 14th June 1952. Built as a Cistercian Abbey, converted into a house and at present used principally as a museum. The abbey was founded in 1278 by Amicia, Countess of Devon. At the Dissolution it was acquired by Sir Richard Grenville in 1541 and it was converted by his famous grandson of the same name, into a house with various additions in circa 1576. Further alterations were made in the 18th century and the building was extensively renovated in the mid 20th century. Rubble walls with granite dressings. Gable ended slate roof with coping stones. Numerous rubble stacks some with moulded granite caps dating from the 16th and 17th century. The original abbey church had a cruciform plan of nave with north and south transepts and two adjoining chapels each side. There was a central tower over the crossing. The accompanying abbey buildings appear to have been situated mainly to the north, some fragments still survive. Sir Richard Grenville probably demolished a large part of these buildings but an 18th century print portrays the building as extending further to the north-east than it now does. When Sir Richard converted the abbey church into a mansion house he incorporated a large part of the Medieval fabric, adapting it to his own uses. The transepts were demolished and the nave divided the eastern end being converted into a single storey great hall with a screens pasage to the east. This room was sumptuously fitted out and a fireplace inserted with the overmantel dated 1576. To the south of the hall a stair wing was added to the west of the former transept. Grenville also built on a large kitchen and service wing at the rear of the screens passage with two large fireplaces in the kitchen. Two further floors were inserted, subdivided into smaller rooms. Other, more minor late 16th century alterations were made by Sir Francis Drake, who bought the property in 1581, including probably the addition of a porch in front of the hall. In the later 18th century a staircase was inserted in the service wing at the rear of the screens passage, the Gothic refenestration and dormer windows at the east end of the building probably date from this period. Few major alterations then seem to have been made until after the 1st World War when Lord and Lady Seaton excavated the former Chancel of the Abbey Church - then the servants hall - to discover the position of the High Altar; they then converted the room into a chapel. In 1938 a severe fire damaged the west end of the house which was afterwards restored. The next major work took place in 1949-51 when an extensive restoration and modernisation programme was undertaken in preparation for opening the property to the public by the National Trust and Plymouth City Museum. Main block is three storeys with basement and an extra storey in the tower. South wing is three storeys with attic. Asymmetrical and crenellated north entrance front of eight windows with single storey projection to left and single storey porch at centre. The plain square tower over the original crossing is to the left of centre. On the lower ground floor level are three single light granite framed windows to right of centre, the centre one is very narrow with a trefoil head, probably 15th century; the right-hand one has a depressed 4-centred arched head and may be early 16t6h century. The left-hand one is square-headed and later 16th century. Above it is another single light window with a late 16th century 3-light mullion to its right and a similar 2-light mullion to the far right with a hoodmould. Between these two is a circa late 15th century 2-light mullion with cinquefoiled heads and square hoodmould. On the 1st floor are late 16th century granite mullion windows, predominantly 4-light but also some with 3-lights with a 2-light and single light window towards the left-hand end. The far left-hand window on this floor has clearly been built into the pointed arch of an original window and there is evidence of original windows over some of the other windows on this floor. The 2nd floor windows occur only to the right of the tower; they are granite mullions in hipped dormers incorporated in the crenellation; 3-light to the left, the 2 right-hand ones have 4 lights. The 1-room projection to the left on the ground floor was originally a chapel adjoining the chancel and transept - the blocked transept arch is clearly visible at its right-hand end, inserted into which is a late 16th century 3-light mullion window. On its front wall three 2-light mullion and transomed windows were inserted probably in the 17th century, the right-hand of which has had a stone arched doorway built into it in the 19th or early 20th century. The projection has probably original granite ashlar buttresses between the windows and diagonally on the corners. The central late 16th century porch also has diagonal buttresses. At its front is a heavily moulded granite segmental headed doorway with leaf design to spandrels. 19th century double doors part-glazed with Gothic tracery in the fanlight. Above the doorway are three plaques bearing various Drake heraldic symbols; the left-hand one has an upraised glove, the right-hand one a Knight's helmet and the central one carries the Drake arms. If Drake himself did not build the porch then he probably added these designs when he bought the house. The right-hand wall of the porch has a similar but simpler doorway, now a window. The main front of the house also has buttresses - the three to the right are of rubble and were probably added by Grenville; the two left-hand ones, now partially obscured by the former chapel, are of ashlar and may be original. On the north face of the tower the position of the steeply gabled transept roof is evident with the blocked transept arch below. The fenestration of the south front dates mainly from Grenville's time apart from two window with Perpendicular tracery to the left. The principal features are Grenville's stair projection to the left of centre, the blocked transept arch to its right (the infilling and hall windows are early 20th century) and Grenville's kitchen wing to the far right which shows evidence on the ground floor of two blocked arches to the south chapels from the transept. The east front has arched windows with Gothic tracery inserted probably in the later 18th century). Interior features reflect the status of the building with some evidence of its original function still visible. In the chapel, originally the chancel, the shafts of its original pillars are visible in the corners. Two piscinas have also been revealed. The former north chapel retains its stone cross vaulted roof. On the 2nd floor at either side of the partially exposed chancel arch are two carved corbels at the point of the springing. On the 3rd floor the crossing of the abbey church can be clearly distinguished with all four arches surviving. The chancel arch was lower and directly above it was a Decorated window of which the head with its tracery and rear arch can still be seen although it has had a door inserted beneath. Much more survives of the late 16th century domestic conversion and modernisations carried out by Sir Richard Grenville and then Sir Francis Drake. The great hall is the most impressive result of this and remains little altered. Its north, south and west walls are lined with ornate high quality panelling. The top panels are arcaded each with a carved lion's head at the apex. The panels are divided verticlaly by fluted pilasters with Corinthian capitals. Above each pilaster are figures, some grotesque, in high relief. The frieze is inlaid with arabesques and has a modillion cornice above. It is arguable however that this may be the later work of Drake as stylistically it is more typical of circa 1600. A decorative plaster frieze above has a running foliage and flower motif. At the east end of the hall are four fluted pillars with inlaid frieze running above, the screen may have been open at this end. On the north wall of the hall is a large moulded granite fireplace with the heavy roll moulding rising to an ogee at the top with a ball motif underneath. The fireplace back is constructed of slates in a herring-bone pattern. The granite framing is enclosed by a probably 18th century wooden surround. Above is a plaster overmantle depicting the figures of Justice, Temperance, Prudence and Fortitude with the date 1576 at the top in Roman numerals. Elaborate narrow moulded rib plaster ceiling in geometric design of interlaced squares and lozenges with two pendant finials. The ceiling curves downwards to meet the plaster frieze and on this curve are four moulded plaster corbels with satyrs on them holding scrolled shields. At the west end of the hall is an allegorical plaster frieze depicting a knight seated under the tree of life with his war eauipment beside him, his shield hung in the tree and his unsaddled horse resting nearby. A skull and hourglass are beside him. The corresponding frieze at the east end is purely decorative. The floor may also be contemporary and is laid with triangular slabs of red tile and white limestone. The 16th century kitchen has two very large fireplaces. One in the gable end wall had a segmental arched lintel inserted below. The lateral fireplace has a square opening with chamfered lintel and two stone ovens. Partly obscuring this fireplace are four 16th century charcoal burning ovens. The high ceiling with simple plaster cornice is probably 18th century. Adjoining the lateral fireplace is a four-centred arched granite doorway, chamfered with pyramid stops. Grenville's original staircase has been replaced by a 20th century one but the 16th century roof of the stair wing survives consisting of substantial principal rafters with morticed curved collars, all richly moulded, purlins and wall plate are also moulded. The room on the first floor at the west end was probably a parlour in the late 16th century. It is also panelled, in a very similar style to the hall except the panels are not arcaded. There is a small depressed 4-centred arched granite fireplace with decorated spandrels and moulded jambs. A similar fireplace survives in the adjoining room. Beyond it is a room refitted in the 18th century with a fielded panel dado and doorcases with projecting frieze and cornice. A bolection moulded wood surround with projecting cornice frames an earlier granite fireplace. The back of one panel bears the inscription "Mr Tho.Rowe, April 1st 1772, Master of this job and foreman of the Sawyers" - presumably this refers to the 18th century joinery in the room although the panelling and fireplace surround are of a slightly earlier style. The 18th century staircase is however fairly typical of this date being open well with cut string and three turned balusters to each step, carved scrolled thread ends and wreathed handrail. Fielded dado panelling to stairs incorporates fluted pilasters opposite the newels. There are also two good dog gates both of open fretwork with inverted segmental tops. In the tower room is one of the few features definately attributable to Drake. It is a granite framed moulded fireplace with plaster overmantel bearing Drake's arms with the Latin inscription "Sic Parvis Magna". (Thus great things from small). Alterations appear to have been made, however, as one side of the overmantel bears the date 1655 and initials R.N. This building has an unusual historical background. It is one of the few Medieval abbeys to undergo conversion into a house, incorporating much of the Medieval fabric. It has also passed through the ownership of two illustrious Elizabethan sailors and adventurers and remained in the Drake family for over three hundred years. It is the combination of these historical associations with the preservation of so much of the early fabric and high quality internal features of the later 16th century which give this building its importance. Other details: LBS Number 92635.


English Heritage, 23/05/2014, Scheduled Monument Consent, Buckland Abbey (Correspondence). SDV356655.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for proposed installation of a new boiler, Cider House.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV123604Article in Serial: Allan, J. P. + Keen, L.. 1983. Medieval Floor Tiles in Exeter Museum. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 41. Paperback Volume. 135-7.
SDV12910Article in Serial: Nenk, B. S. + Margeson, S. + Hurley, M.. 1994. Medieval Britain and Ireland 1993. Medieval Archaeology. 38. Paperback Volume. 202.
SDV17562Monograph: Hoskins, W. G.. 1954. A New Survey of England: Devon. A New Survey of England: Devon. A5 Hardback. 356-357.
SDV232723Report - Evaluation: Reed, S. J.. 1998. Archaeological Evaluation and Recording at Buckland Abbey, Yelverton, 1998. Exeter Archaeology Report. 98.80. A4 stapled + Digital.
SDV233132Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1984. DAP/CV. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 13.
SDV239444List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1960. Tavistock RD. Historic Houses Register. Unknown. 7.
SDV241947Article in Serial: Birch, W de G.. 1870. On the Date of Foundation Ascribed to the Cistertian Abbeys in Great Britain. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 26. Unknown. 298, 366.
SDV241948Article in Serial: Seaton, Lady. 1927. Proceedings of the Congress of the British Archaeological Association at Exeter. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 33. Unknown. 24-25.
SDV241949Article in Serial: Youings, J.. 1980. Drake, Grenville and Buckland Abbey. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 112. A5 Paperback. 95-99.
SDV241950Article in Serial: Brooking Rowe, J.. 1875. The Cistercian Houses of Devon, Part 1: Buckland Abbey. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 7. Unknown. 343-359.
SDV241952Monograph: Knowles, D. + St. Joseph, J. K.. 1952. Monastic Sites from the Air. Monastic Sites from the Air. Unknown. 146-147.
SDV241953Correspondence: Department of Environment. 1985. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241954Correspondence: Department of Environment. 1987. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241955Correspondence: Department of Environment. 1987. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241956Correspondence: Department of Environment. 1988. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241959Personal Comment: Timms, S. C.. 1984. Buckland Abbey. Unknown.
SDV241960Article in Serial: Coulson, C.. 1982. Hierarchism in Conventual Crenellation: An Essay in the Sociology of Medieval Fortifications. Medieval Archaeology. 26. Unknown. 69-100.
SDV241962Report - Excavation: Pye, A.. 1985. Buckland Abbey Excavations (Cider House) 1984. A Summary. Not applicable. Typescript.
SDV241963Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1992. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241964Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1993. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241965Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1994. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241966Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1994. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241967Un-published: Gibbons, P.. 1994. 134699. Monument Protection Programme. Not applicable. Unknown.
SDV241972Report - non-specific: Watts, M. A.. 1993. Archaeological Recording at Buckland Abbey, Yelverton, 1993. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 93.85. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV241973Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1996. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241974Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1996. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241975Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1997. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241977Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 1998. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241978Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 1998. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241979Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 1999. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241982Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2002. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV241983Report - Survey: Nicholas Pearson Associates. 2001. Buckland Abbey: Historic Survey and Restoration Plan. National Trust Archaeological Survey Report. A4 Spiral Bound + Digital. 19.
SDV241984Article in Serial: Beckerlegge, J. J.. 1941. 10th Report of the Plymouth and District Branch. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 73. A5 Hardback. 119-120.
SDV241987Aerial Photograph: National Monuments Record. SX4868. National Monuments Record Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper).
SDV241992Article in Serial: Brooking Rowe, J.. 1876. The Cistercian Houses of Devon, Part II: Buckland Abbey, Concluded. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 8. Unknown. 797-808.
SDV241993Article in Serial: Stephan, J.. 1963. Presidential Address: Devon Cistercians in English Literature. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 95. A5 Hardback. 26.
SDV241997Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University Collection. 1950. CUC/FK. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. Photograph (Paper). 64-70.
SDV242000Article in Serial: Unknown. Unknown. Country Life. 39. Unknown. 338.
SDV242009Article in Serial: Copeland, G. W.. 1953. Some Problems of Buckland Abbey. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 85. A5 Hardback. 41-52.
SDV242010Report - Survey: Copeland, G. W.. 1953. Buckland Abbey: An Architectural Survey. Not applicable. Unknown. Unknown.
SDV242021Undergraduate Dissertation: Barber, B.. 1984. Buckland Abbey. University of York Dissertation. Unknown.
SDV242023Report - non-specific: Bettley, T.. 1988. Buckland Abbey Guesthouse Report. Not applicable. Unknown. Unknown.
SDV242025Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1907. 111SE. Second Edition Ordnance Survey 6 inch Map. Map (Paper).
SDV242027Report - Survey: Gaskell-Brown, C.. 1986 - 1987. Buckland Abbey, Devon. Devon Religious Houses Survey. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV242033Article in Serial: Gaskell-Brown, C.. 1995. Buckland Abbey, Devon:Surveys and Excavations, 1983-1995. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 53. Paperback Volume. 25-82.
SDV242037Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1988. DAP/JV. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 2-5.
SDV322630Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2005. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV323253Monograph: Knowles, D. + Hadcock, R. N.. 1971. Medieval Religious Houses: England and Wales. Medieval Religious Houses: England and Wales. Unknown + Digital (part). 112, 116.
SDV325629Monograph: Cherry, B. + Pevsner, N.. 1989. The Buildings of England: Devon. The Buildings of England: Devon. Hardback Volume. 227-30.
SDV336004Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2006. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV336189Post-Graduate Thesis: Higham, R. A.. 1979. The Castles of Medieval Devon. University of Exeter Thesis. Unknown. 179.
SDV336252Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2006. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Buckland Abbey. Letter.
SDV337942Record Office Collection: Swete, R. J. (Revd). 1792-1801. 564M 'Picturesque Sketches of Devon' by Reverend John Swete. Devon Record Office Collection. Unknown + Digital. 564M/4/181,185.
SDV341278Article in Serial: Higham, R. A.. 1988. Devon Castles: An Annotated List. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 46. Paperback Volume. 144.
SDV343247Un-published: Weston, S.. 1983. List of Field Monument Warden Visits 1983. Lists of Field Monument Warden Visits. Unknown.
SDV344043Schedule Document: Ministry of Works. 1950. Buckland Abbey. The Schedule of Monuments. Foolscap.
SDV344044Schedule Document: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 1998. Buckland Abbey. The Schedule of Monuments. A4 Stapled. [Mapped feature: #94907 ]
SDV344045Correspondence: English Heritage. 2009. Buckland Abbey. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV344668Article in Serial: Allan, J.. 2006. The Excavation of a Brewhouse at Buckland Abbey in 2005. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 64. Paperback Volume. 241-265.
SDV346128List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: English Heritage. 2011. Historic Houses Register. Historic Houses Register. Website.
SDV346288Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. 1977. SX46NE9. OSAD Card. Card Index + Digital.
SDV346289National Monuments Record Database: National Monuments Record. 2011. 437786. National Monuments Record Database. Website.
SDV347351Report - Assessment: Berry, N.. 2006. Buckland Abbey, Devon: Desk Top Survey of Quarries Within Scheduled Monument. National Trust Report. A4 Comb Bound. 1.
SDV347681Un-published: Unknown. 1986 - 1987. Devon Religious Houses Survey. Devon Religious Houses Survey. Mixed Archive Material.
SDV356655Correspondence: English Heritage. 23/05/2014. Scheduled Monument Consent, Buckland Abbey. Scheduled Monument Consent Granted. Digital.
SDV358417Un-published: Devon Religious Houses Survey. 1986/87. Devon Religious Houses Survey 1986/87. Preliminary Assessment Form. Buckland. Devon Religious Houses Survey. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV361751Article in Serial: Robinson, D. M. + Harrison, S.. 2006. Cistercian Cloisters in England and Wales. Part 1. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 159. Digital. 170.
SDV4676Article in Serial: French, K. + French, C.. 1957. Devonshire Plasterwork. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 89. A5 Hardback. 127.

Associated Monuments

MDV67193Parent of: 18th Century Gateway at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV5456Parent of: Apple Crusher at Buckland Abbey (Find Spot)
MDV77559Parent of: Brewhouse at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV76193Parent of: Buckland Abbey Tudor Mansion (Building)
MDV60762Parent of: Building at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV79260Parent of: Cart Shed at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV21280Parent of: Cider House at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV53039Parent of: Cloister at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV5455Parent of: Cross at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV58274Parent of: Culvert at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV67188Parent of: Culvert at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV54727Parent of: Garden at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV21279Parent of: Gargoyles at Welltown Meadow, Walkhampton (Find Spot)
MDV67185Parent of: Gateway to Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV77560Parent of: Great Drain at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV56078Parent of: Guest House at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV67194Parent of: Ha Ha at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV61875Parent of: Home Farm at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV67186Parent of: Kitchen Garden at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV67190Parent of: Linhay at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV44100Parent of: Medieval Buildings at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV53038Parent of: Medieval Cemetery at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV79200Parent of: Medieval Longhouse, Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV67205Parent of: North Lodge, Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV67192Parent of: Orchard at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV53041Parent of: Pond at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV5452Parent of: Pot Quern at Buckland Abbey (Find Spot)
MDV67187Parent of: Pre 1784 Gateway to Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV53042Parent of: Precinct Wall at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV121648Parent of: Shippon at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV67189Parent of: South Lodge, Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV121649Parent of: Stables at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV5453Parent of: Tithe Barn at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV44101Parent of: Tower Cottage at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV67191Parent of: Wall at Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV5454Parent of: Watermill at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV114439Part of: Ornamental Gardens at Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV21352Related to: Earthworks east of Place Barton House, Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV21351Related to: Earthworks west of Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV79199Related to: Iron Age Enclosure, Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV52223Related to: Place Barton House, Buckland Abbey (Building)
MDV53154Related to: Quarries to north-east of Buckland Abbey (Monument)
MDV5474Related to: St Andrew's Parish Church, Buckland Monachorum (Building)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV2100 - Archaeological Evaluation and Recording at Buckland Abbey, Yelverton, 1998
  • EDV2101 - Archaeological Recording at Buckland Abbey, Yelverton, 1993
  • EDV3876 - Buckland Abbey Excavations (Cider House)
  • EDV4745 - Excavation of a Brewhouse at Buckland Abbey

Date Last Edited:Sep 6 2018 1:19PM