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HER Number:MDV55291
Name:Farmhouse at Leigh Barton, Churchstow

Summary

Leigh Barton farmhouse dates from the 15th century with later additions and alterations

Location

Grid Reference:SX 720 467
Map Sheet:SX74NW
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishChurchstow
DistrictSouth Hams
Ecclesiastical ParishCHURCHSTOW

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • National Monuments Record: 444410
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX74NW/1/3
  • Old Listed Building Ref (I): 99516
  • Old SAM County Ref: 193
  • Old SAM Ref: 24134
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division: SX74NW12

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • FARMHOUSE (XV to XVIII - 1401 AD to 1800 AD (Between))

Full description

Drewe Pearce Chartered Surveyors, Leigh Barton, Churchstow, Near Kingsbridge, Devon (Un-published). SDV344601.

The property consists of a remarkable set of buildings once part of a freehold tenancy of Buckfast Abbey. The main elements form a fine late-medieval complex of buildings of considerable historical and architectural importance which remained in use until acquired by the Department of Environment in 1974. The gatehouse and lodging ranges at Leigh Barton contribute to its exceptional significance, they are rare survivals in Devon and of very high quality.


English Heritage, Leigh Barton, Churchstow, South Devon (Pamphlet). SDV344603.

Leaflet describes history of the site and the various buildings with particular features to look out for.


Fox, S. P., 1874, Untitled Source, 217 (Monograph). SDV155994.


Everett, A. W., 1937, Leigh (Article in Serial). SDV336458.

Some of the buildings are monastic in character but there is no definite historical link with Buckfast Abbey. The surviving buildings are located round three sides of an inner court which lies to the south of the outer court and gatehouse. The existing farmhouse constitutes the north range which was built in the 15th century. Externally it is plain and has also been altered inside. Three room cross passage plan with two-storey porch on south side. Oak screen with plaster frieze in one room. The west range was the refectory which, like the south range, was built in early 16th century. It has dais at north end with room above approached from an internal gallery. This upper room has fireplace and garderobe. Rest of refectory is open to roof. The south range is now made up of two rooms on each floor but there was originally another room to the east. An external gallery on the north gives access to two other rooms on first floor. These are divided by lathe and plaster partition and each has a garderobe. The west room on first floor has arched braced roof, the roof of the east room on first floor is plain. The east room on ground floor was the kitchen with massive fireplace. Originally, there was a wall or another range on east side of inner court.


Ministry of Works, 1939, Leigh Barton Farm, Gatehouse, Hall and Kitchen, Kingsbridge (Schedule Document). SDV156674.

Leigh Barton Farm, gatehouse, hall and kitchen. The inner court has a farmhouse on its north side and on the west and half the south side a hall and kitchen of the early 16th century. The hall is on the ground floor and over the dais end is a chamber with fireplace and garderobe. Half the body of the hall was covered by a gallery giving access to this room. Access to the internal gallery was by a surviving external gallery and stair. The kichen is on the ground floor and over it and the south end of the hall range are two chambers each with a garderobe.


Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, 1952 - 1953, SX74NW12 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV336459.

Remains of a monastery.
An Unimportant or unclassified monastic foundation. Buckfast Abbey owned a grange or farm at Leigh.
Some interesting remains of this old grange still exist, especially the beautiful arch at the entrance to the old buildings in the courtyard.
Originally a cell to Buckfast Abbey. Besides the gatehouse there is a large building, possibly a chapel or refectory of which the eastern end appears to be of later date than the rest. A large buttress in the south wall of this building has an internal recess. The western end of the building is two storeyed, the basement now a byre and the upper room reached by external steps. A large granite cider pound has now been converted into a drinking trough.
Remains of a grange. Parallel to the gatehouse, the present farmhouse. At right angles to this is the manor house, an L-shaped building. The hall was in the wing behind the present house on the upper floor. Below it was the kitchen. An outer staircase leads to a timber arcade in front of the hall.
The hall requires attention to prevent further deterioration. The dorways and windows are of granite or wood. The portion which was incorporated in the present farmhouse has now been sealed off and virtually destroyed in modernising and renovating the farmhouse.


Morley, B. M., 1983, Leigh Barton, Churchstow, South Devon, 81-106 (Article in Serial). SDV336463.


Department of Environment, 1989, Churchstow (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV336494.

Leigh Barton Farmhouse with monastic lodging. 15th century with 17th century renovation and reconstruction from circa1983. Green-grey schist, slate or asbestos-cement slate roofs. A U-plan courtyard group, open towards the east; the north range, much reconstructed in the 17th century and re-windowed in the 19th century, with central hall and remains of screen, cross passage, and external stair turret to the north. Attached to this an L-plan 15th century range with kitchen, ex Tomel gallery to upper lodgings and storage. The whole is fully described and interpreted by Beric M Morley. Rear ranges are in two storeys; the kitchen wing, set east-west, has a recently been reconstructed (1988) six-bay timber gallery on compartmental floor to moulded beams, and 12-bay panelled balustrade to moulded muntins and hand-rail, approached by steep flight of seven stone steps from chamfered plinth. Below this a two-light timber casement and wide open to kitchen. Left gable end, to half hip has remains of a vaulted bread oven, doorway broken through a second similar area, and square opening at upper level, former doorway. From the southeast corner a low wall connects across to the adjacent farm buildings and contains lower parts of two former windows. South front has at each side of a broad garderobe turret a small opening to shouldered arch and a two-light stone mullion and transom casement to cusping and stopped hoodmould; to the right a buttress with three offsets. Left gable is to coped verge, with small ridge stack, above a shouldered door opening, probably a former window, and a two-light casement as south face. To the left, the outer wall of the return arm has a stepped garderobe turret flanked each side by small shouldered opening with iron armature, and first floor left a two-light stone cusped casement. The east, courtyard front of this wing has broad opening to chamfered lintel, partly below the gallery and at first floor level a single light casement to recessed chamfer jambs under a granite moulded lintel with dropped ends, not corresponding with jamb moulding, and a two-light basket-handle arched casement with transom and stopped hoodmould, all in granite.
Interior: Kitchen has remains of large fire opening to vaulting on responds, four large chamfered beams to renewed floor, and a timber breast wall to an upper chamber. North wall has splayed openings to door and casement, and two rectangular recesses. Restructured four-bay and two bay roof on cruck like principals to high cambered collar. Between to parts a half-timbered partition to full height. The west range has interior gallery in half-timbering, returned across the north end and carried on square post to square base; part here is full height to roof, under reconstruction at time of inspection in December 1988. Between west and south ranges a wide opening with bressummer carried on corbel responds, and a long splay from east-side entry.
Farmhouse and hall range: front to inner courtyard has, far left, a small single light at mid height, then half-hipped porch to chamfered round arch, on steps from the cobbled courtyard. Above porch a two-light casement and some rendering on stonework. To the right a series of 19th century casements: at ground floor two, three and four-light, and at first floor two, three and three-light. Right gable end has external stack, and single storey lean-to addition. The north front, former entry side, faces the Gate House across courtyard. At left a gabled stair projection with 19th century margin-bar casement. To right large external stack to hall fireplace, then six-panel 19th century door in wider blocked opening to wood lintel, below a two-light casement, and a small casement far right. A single lean-to building abuts the wall linking farmhouse to gatehouse, containing door beneath a moulded granite fragment as link. The west gable wall has two-light over three-light reconstructed casement.
Interior: inspected only in part, retains part of 16th century cross passage screen, and stone spiral stair from hall to right of main fireplace. The farmhouse largely reconstructed in the 17th century.


Brown, S. W., 1990, The Farmhouse at Leigh Barton, Churchstow, Devon (Un-published). SDV336471.

Summary of archaeological work at Leigh Barton since 1983 included the 1988 excavation of the farmhouse and adjacent areas from which several sherds of medieval pottery were recovered.


Gerrard, S., 1994, 133450 (Un-published). SDV336491.

The fortified house at Leigh Barton lies in a narrow valley drained by a small unnamed stream that runs north to join the River Avon. The building known as the farmhouse was originally constructed during the medieval period although it now forms the focus of a considerably enlarged and partially fortified house which was built on the site in the late 15th or early 16th century. This house, includes the modified farmhouse, two major ranges, a curtain wall and gatehouse. The farmhouse is a rectangular, three room through-passage plan building, and a detailed fabric analysis by Brown during consolidation work has revealed a complex sequence of alterations and additions. Four major post medieval phases have been identified: the first witnessed the insertion of the fine, 16th century timber screen, together with flooring over the passage, and the addition of a two storey porch. The screen was intended to be viewed from an open hall, since its lower, elaborately ornamented lower portion rises to a rail more than 0.9 metres above the present first floor level. Above the rail, the screen is built of lath and plaster and although very different in character, both parts are considered to have been constructed at the same time. The insertion of the screen created a narrow room above the cross passage which was entered from the stair to which two additional steps were added. Entry to the first floor of the porch was through this narrow room via a doorway cut through the outer walling. The insertion of this doorway together with the other alterations associated with the building of the porch appears to have caused a structural weakness which very quickly led to movement in the area. The second phase probably dates to the later part of the 16th century and seems to have been primarily concerned with altering the developments made during the earlier part of the same century. The narrow room above the cross passage was enlarged by the removal of the west wall to create two equally sized chambers and the entrance to the first floor room within the porch was blocked. The abandonment of the upper floor of the porch was probably associated with the structural problems within this area. Other works associated with this phase include the raising of the floor over the east services. In phase three, which probably dates to the mid 17th century, practically the whole of the structure east of the cross passage was rebuilt. The open hall and any room or rooms beyond were replaced by two rooms on each of two floors. Fireplaces were provided in all fpur rooms, and a projecting stair on the n gave access to the upper floor. The west room on the first floor still retains remnants of a fine plaster frieze, indicating that this became the principle chamber. The roof was entirely replaced at this time by the structure which survives in large part today. Phase four dates from the 18th century and includes numerous, minor alterations amongst which are: the enlargement of some window embrasures, the insertion of at least two new windows; the insertion of three new doors; the narrowing of two others; the construction of leanto outbuildings against the north and east walls; and changing the access to the ground floor of the porch so that it could be entered from the east instead of the south. The pair of ranges added to the farmhouse must have considerably upgraded the status of Leigh Barton and must reflect new found social status and wealth. Both ranges are built in the local greeny-grey schist and the west range is butted onto the southwest corner of the farmhouse, whilst the south range is aligned east to west. Details of the architectural character of both ranges is known from the work of Morley. The west range includes a floor level store together with a first floor chamber. This is the smallest of the first floor chambers, although it has its own garderobe turret and two windows. Access to this chamber was via an external staircase and gallery leading to a reconstructed internal gallery which may have also served as a lobby or waiting space. The roof of this chamber is of four bays, with slightly tapering principals and cambered collars supported by arch braces, each in two pieces, the lower running down into a slot in the wall faces. The south range includes a store and kitchen at ground level together with two chambers above, which were entered via an external staircase and gallery. The west chamber is taller than its neighbour, has a fine four bayed roof, with slightly tapering principals and cambered collars and a fireplace. The fireplace is built into the west wall and has an unadorned schist head. The east chamber is the larger of the two, but has a less elaborate roof with tied principals and has no fireplace, its heating being derived from the kitchen below. Both chambers share half of a double garderobe turret built within the south wall of the range. The kitchen lies across a yard from the screen's passage and its interior must have been dominated by a huge hearth which occupied the whole of the east wall. The great arch which supported the front of this hearth no longer survives having been removed when the east part of this range was demolished, the floors and partitions removed and the resultant spaces converted to agricultural uses. At the back of the hearth are the remains of two large ovens, both of which have also seen limited damage. Other original features surviving within the kitchen include a small single window on the south side, two wall presses in the north wall and a channel in the south wall which led in from a stone basin outside. The south range originally continued east as witnessed by a small exploratory excavation in 1982, which located the original construction trench and surviving masonry denoting the south wall. It is however not known exactly how far this range extended.


Manco, J., 1994, Leigh Barton, Churchstow, Devon, 1-14 (Un-published). SDV336472.


Department of National Heritage, 1996, Site of a Medieval Fortified House at Leigh Barton, including the South and West Ranges, a Gatehouse, Section of Curtain Wall and Fishpond (Schedule Document). SDV342503.

This monument includes the site of a fortified Medieval farmhouse at Leigh Barton, including the south and west building ranges of the house, a gatehouse, section of curtain wall and fishpond in addition to buried remains beneath the Grade I Listed house. The monument lies in a narrow valley drained by a small unnamed stream that runs north to join the River Avon. The Medieval house formed a U-plan with the present farmhouse range to the north. The farmhouse itself, which is Listed Grade I and is excluded from the scheduling, has surviving fabric dating from the Late Medieval period up to the 20th century. The house has a rectangular, three room through-passage plan, and appears to have followed a fairly typical pattern of development for a Devon farmhouse. Recently, limited excavation and a detailed fabric analysis during consolidation work has revealed a complex sequence of alterations and additions. Eight major phases have been identified: the first is known only from archaeological excavation and the evidence includes a trench and several large post holes, along with a number of stakeholes, found within the service room of the farmhouse, together with stakeholes and a wicker-lined pit in the hall. These appear to represent two phases of substantial wooden buildings which presumably pre-date the earliest surviving stone built phase. The second phase saw the construction of a stone building and is considered to belong to the Late Medieval period. Masonry belonging to this phase survives through most of the western service end to a point just east of the cross passage. From this evidence it is clear that the through passage is an original feature. At least part of the western service end was floored over and the roof level was at least as high as at present. The third phase also belonged to the Late Medieval period and included the insertion of a garderobe into the south-western corner of the building and a window let into the southern wall. The fourth phase was the final Medieval one, when a stone stair was added together with a first floor partition and a window to light the new stair. The western wall of the through passage was also widened and heightened. All these changes were associated with a new first floor room over the eastern services. The fifth phase witnessed the insertion of the fine 16th century timber screen, together with flooring over the passage, and the addition of a two storey porch. The screen was intended to be viewed from an open hall, since its elaborately ornamented portion rises to a rail more than 0.9 metres above the present first floor level. Above the rail the screen is built of daub and, although very different in character, both parts are considered to have been constructed at the same time. The insertion of the screen created a narrow room above the cross passage which was entered from the stair, to which two additional steps were added. Entry to the first floor of the porch was through this narrow room via a doorway cut through the outer walling. The insertion of this doorway together with the other alterations associated with the building of the porch appears to have caused a structural weakness which very quickly led to movement in the area. The sixth phase probably dates to the later part of the 16th century and seems to have been primarily concerned with altering the developments made during the earlier part of the same century. The narrow room above the cross passage was enlarged by the removal of the western wall to create two equally sized chambers and the entrance to the first floor room within the porch was blocked. The abandonment of the upper floor of the porch was probably associated with the structural problems within this area. Other works associated with this phase include the raising of the floor over the eastern services. In phase seven, which probably dates to the mid-17th century, practically the whole of the structure east of the cross passage was rebuilt. The open hall and any room or rooms beyond were replaced by two rooms on each of two floors. Fireplaces were provided in all four rooms, and a projecting stair on the north gave access to the upper floor. The eastern room on the first floor still retains remnants of a fine plaster frieze, indicating that this became the principal chamber. The roof was entirely replaced at this time by the structure which survives in large part today. Phase eight dates from the 18th century and included numerous minor alterations amongst which were: the enlargement of some window embrasures and the insertion of at least two new windows; the insertion of three new doors and the narrowing of two others; the construction of leanto outbuildings against the north and east walls; and changing the access to the ground floor of the porch so that it could be entered from the east instead of the south. The pair of ranges associated with the farmhouse are also Listed Grade I. They represent part of a programme of enlargement and upgrading in the 15th century or early part of the 16th century when the curtain wall and gatehouse were also added. Both ranges are built in the local greeny-grey schist, and the western range is butted onto the south western corner of the farmhouse, whilst the southern range is aligned east to west. The western range includes a floor level store together with a first floor chamber. This is the smallest of the first floor chambers, although it has its own garderobe turret and two windows. Access to this chamber was via an external staircase and gallery leading to a reconstructed internal gallery which may have also served as a lobby or waiting space. The roof of this chamber is of four bays, with slightly tapering principals and cambered collars supported by arch braces, each in two pieces, the lower running down into a slot in the wall faces. The southern range includes a store and kitchen at ground level, together with two chambers above which were entered via an external staircase and gallery. The western chamber is taller than its neighbour, has a jointed cruck roof with arch-braced collars which has been largely rebuilt, and a fireplace. The fireplace is built into the western wall and has an unadorned schist head. The eastern chamber is the larger of the two, but has a less elaborate roof with tied principals and has no fireplace, its heating being derived from the kitchen below. Both chambers share half of a double garderobe turret built within the southern wall of the range. The kitchen lies across a yard from the screen's passage and its interior must have been dominated by a huge hearth which occupied the whole of the east wall. The great arch which supported the front of this hearth no longer survives, having been removed when the eastern part of this range was demolished, the floors and partitions removed and the resultant spaces converted to agricultural uses. At the back of the hearth are the remains of two large ovens, both of which have also seen limited damage. Other original features surviving within the kitchen include a small single window on the south side, two wall presses in the north wall and a channel in the south wall which led in from a stone basin outside. The southern range originally continued eastward, as discovered by a small exploratory excavation in 1982, which located the original construction trench and surviving masonry denoting the southern wall. However, it is not known exactly how far this range extended. There is a considerable body of historical documentation relating to Leigh Barton. The property was held from at least the late 13th century by the family who, as free tenants of Buckfast Abbey in their manor of Churchstow, took their name from Leigh. The earliest solid evidence comes from a late 13th century charter in which Thomas Leigh was granted a portion of wood by the Abbot of Buckfast. Through the 15th and 16th centuries a sequence of documents clearly confirm that the property remained in the hands of the Leighs. Of particular interest is one document where mention is made of the `two chambers over the Kechen'. In later years the property passed through several families, and by 1768 Leigh Barton was a tenant farm. In recent years there has been discussion concerning the status of the farm. Some historians have seen the site as a grange of Buckfast Abbey but, although the buildings do have an institutional character, historical documentation provides no evidence to support the idea. Excluded from the scheduling are the Grade I listed farmhouse (north range) all modern footpath surfaces, wooden fences, scaffolding and the bull pen, although the ground below all of these is included. A second fishpond lying 110 metres south east of the monument is not considered to be of national importance. Despite later additions and alterations, Leigh Barton farmhouse survives comparatively well and contains a number of significant architectural features illustrating the development of a typical Devonshire house. The ranges are an unusual adjunct to such a house and despite their conversion to barns, much important architectural information survives.


Brown, S., 1998, Leigh Barton, 5-108 (Article in Serial). SDV336468.


Waterhouse, R., 1998, Smoking Chambers in Devon, Part 2, 6 (Article in Serial). SDV348115.

A large charnel box (wooden fire hood) in front of removed hearth arch would have functioned as a smoking chamber, albeit a very crude one.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2000, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV336492.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted, subject to conditions, for works concerning the refurbishment of the north and west ranges to form five-bedroomed accommodation, and the installation of new disabled WCs and associated drainage.


Fearon, B., 2003, Return Visit to Leigh Barton, 5 (Article in Serial). SDV336474.


Groves, C., 2006, Tree-Ring Analysis of Timbers from Leigh Barton, Churchstow, Devon (Report - Scientific). SDV347000.

Dendrochronological analysis was undertaken on samples from 98 timbers from the north and south ranges. Of these, 32 were successfully dated. Those associated with the south range indicate a major phase of construction shortly after felling in the late 15th or early 16th century, whilst those from the north range indicate phases of modification/repair in the early 17th century and the late 18th century. A single timber from the north range may be associated with an earlier phase of building activity in the mid 15th century. The fact that relatively few timbers could be dated demonstrates the continued difficulties encountered during dendrochronological analysis in parts of Devon. See report for full details.


National Monuments Record, 2011, 444410 (National Monuments Record Database). SDV346477.

The site of a fortified Medieval farmhouse at Leigh Barton, formerly a grange of Buckfast, including the south and west building ranges of the house, a gatehouse, section of curtain wall and fishpond in addition to buried remains beneath the Grade I Listed house. The Medieval house formed a U-plan with the present farmhouse range to the north. The house has a rectangular, three room through-passage plan, and appears to have followed a fairly typical pattern of development for a Devon farmhouse of which eight major phases have been identified. The first is known only from archaeological excavation and the evidence includes post holes, stakeholes, and a wicker-lined pit which represent two phases of substantial wooden buildings which pre-date the earliest surviving stone built phase. The second phase saw the construction of a open halled stone building belonging to the late medieval period. The third phase is also late medieval and included the insertion of a garderobe. The fourth phase was the final medieval one, when a stone stair was added together with a first floor partition. The fifth phase witnessed the insertion of the fine 16th century timber screen, together with flooring over the passage, and the addition of a two storey porch. The sixth phase probably dates to the late 16th century and seems to have been primarily concerned with altering the developments made during the earlier part of the same century. In phase seven, which probably dates to the mid 17th century, practically the whole of the structure east of the cross passage was rebuilt. The open hall and any room(s) beyond were replaced by two rooms on each of two floors. Phase eight dates from the 18th century and included numerous minor alterations including the enlargement of window embrasures and insertion of new doors.


English Heritage, 2011, Historic Houses Register (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV346128.

Leigh Barton Farmhouse was Listed on 28th July 1989. Farmhouse with monastic lodging. 15th and 17th century renovation and reconstruction from circa 1983. Green-grey schist, slate or asbestos-cement slate roofs. A U-plan courtyard group, open towards the east; the north range, much reconstructed in the 17th century and re-windowed in the 19th century, with central hall and remains of screen, cross passage, and external stair turret to the north. Attached to this an L-plan 15th century range with kitchen, ex tomel gallery to upper lodgings and storage. Rear ranges are in two storeys; the kitchen wing, set east-west, has a recently reconstructed (1988) 6-bay timber gallery on compartmental floor to moulded beams, and 12-bay panelled balustrade to moulded muntins and hand-rail, approached by steep flight of seven stone steps from chamfered plinth. Below this a 2-light timber casement and wide open to kitchen. Left gable end, to half hip has remains of a vaulted bread oven, doorway broken through a second similar area, and square opening at upper level, former doorway. From the south-east corner a low wall connects across to the adjacent farm buildings and contains lower parts of two former windows. South front has at each side of a broad garderobe turret a small opening to shouldered arch and a 2-light stone mullion and transom casement to cusping and stopped hoodmould; to the right a buttress with three offsets. Left gable is to coped verge, with small ridge stack, above a shouldered door opening, probably a former window, and a 2-light casement as south face. To the left, the outer wall of the return arm has a stepped garderobe turret flanked each side by small shouldered opening with iron armature, and first floor left a 2 light stone cusped casement. The east, courtyard front of this wing has broad opening to chamfered lintel, partly below the gallery and at first floor level a single light casement to recessed chamfer jambs under a granite moulded lintel with dropped ends, not corresponding with jamb moulding, and a 2-light basket-handle arched casement with transom and stopped hoodmould, all in granite. Interior: Kitchen has remains of large fire opening to vaulting on responds, four large chamfered beams to renewed floor, and a timber breast wall to an upper chamber. North wall has splayed openings to door and casement, and two rectangular recesses. Restructured four-bay and two bay roof on cruck like principals to high cambered collar. Between to parts a half-timbered partition to full height. The west range has interior gallery in half-timbering, returned across the north end and carried on square post to square base; part here is full height to roof, under reconstruction in December 1988. Between west and south ranges a wide opening with bressummer carried on corbel responds, and a long splay from east-side entry. Farmhouse and hall range: front to inner courtyard has, far left, a small single light at mid height, then half hipped porch to chamfered round arch, on steps from the cobbled courtyard. Above porch a 2-light casement and some rendering on stonework. To the right a series of 19th century casements: at ground floor 2, 3 and 4-light, and at first floor 2, 3 and 3-light. right gable end has external stack, and single storey lean-to addition. The north front, former entry side, faces the Gate House across courtyard. At left a gabled stair projection with 19th century margin-bar casement. To right large external stack to hall fireplace, then 6-panel 19th century door in wider blocked opening to wood lintel, below a 2-light casement, and a small casement far right. A single lean-to building abuts the wall linking farmhouse to gatehouse, containing door beneath a moulded granite fragment as link. The west gable wall has 2-light over 3-light reconstructed casement. Interior: inspected only in part, retains part of 16th century cross passage screen, and stone spiral stair from hall to right of main fireplace. The farmhouse largely reconstructed in the 17th century.


Ordnance Survey, 2011, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV346129.

Leigh Barton farmhouse shown as a U-shaped building on modern mapping.


Richards, A., 2011, Untitled Source (Personal Comment). SDV346478.

The Medieval house at Leigh Barton is excluded from the scheduling although the ground beneath it is included.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV155994Monograph: Fox, S. P.. 1874. Kingsbridge and its Surroundings. Unknown. 217.
SDV156674Schedule Document: Ministry of Works. 1939. Leigh Barton Farm, Gatehouse, Hall and Kitchen, Kingsbridge. The Schedule of Monuments. Foolscap.
SDV336458Article in Serial: Everett, A. W.. 1937. Leigh. Buckfast Abbey Chronicle. 7. Unknown.
SDV336459Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. 1952 - 1953. SX74NW12. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
SDV336463Article in Serial: Morley, B. M.. 1983. Leigh Barton, Churchstow, South Devon. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 41. Unknown. 81-106.
SDV336468Article in Serial: Brown, S.. 1998. Leigh Barton. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 56. A5 Paperback. 5-108.
SDV336471Un-published: Brown, S. W.. 1990. The Farmhouse at Leigh Barton, Churchstow, Devon. Unknown.
SDV336472Un-published: Manco, J.. 1994. Leigh Barton, Churchstow, Devon. Unknown. 1-14.
SDV336474Article in Serial: Fearon, B.. 2003. Return Visit to Leigh Barton. Devon Archaeological Society Newsletter. 86. A4 Stapled + Digital. 5.
SDV336491Un-published: Gerrard, S.. 1994. 133450. Monument Protection Programme. Unknown.
SDV336492Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2000. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV336494List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1989. Churchstow. Historic Houses Register. Website.
SDV342503Schedule Document: Department of National Heritage. 1996. Site of a Medieval Fortified House at Leigh Barton, including the South and West Ranges, a Gatehouse, Section of Curtain Wall and Fishpond. The Schedule of Monuments. A4 Stapled.
SDV344601Un-published: Drewe Pearce Chartered Surveyors. Leigh Barton, Churchstow, Near Kingsbridge, Devon. Sale Particulars. A4 Stapled.
SDV344603Pamphlet: English Heritage. Leigh Barton, Churchstow, South Devon. English Heritage. A4 Stapled.
SDV346128List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: English Heritage. 2011. Historic Houses Register. Historic Houses Register. Website.
SDV346129Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2011. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey. Map (Digital). [Mapped feature: #95187 ]
SDV346477National Monuments Record Database: National Monuments Record. 2011. 444410. National Monuments Record Database. Website.
SDV346478Personal Comment: Richards, A.. 2011.
SDV347000Report - Scientific: Groves, C.. 2006. Tree-Ring Analysis of Timbers from Leigh Barton, Churchstow, Devon. English Heritage Report. 10/2006. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV348115Article in Serial: Waterhouse, R.. 1998. Smoking Chambers in Devon, Part 2. Devon Buildings Group Newsletter. 16. A4 Stapled + Digital. 6.

Associated Monuments

MDV7067Part of: Leigh Barton Farmstead (Monument)
MDV19155Related to: Fishponds at Leigh Barton, Churchstow (Monument)
MDV7068Related to: Gatehouse and Wall at Leigh Barton, Churchstow (Building)
MDV72688Related to: Pound House, Grange and Barn at Leigh Barton (Building)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV4983 - Tree-Ring Analysis of Timbers at Leigh Barton, Churchstow

Date Last Edited:Jul 25 2019 10:50AM