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HER Number:MDV5621
Name:Former Chapel and Cider House, Membury Court

Summary

Remains of a 14th century chapel at Membury Court which probably ceased to be used as a chapel in the 16th century and is now used for agricultural purposes.

Location

Grid Reference:ST 264 038
Map Sheet:ST20SE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishMembury
DistrictEast Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishMEMBURY

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • National Monuments Record: 1405578
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: ST20SE/2/1
  • Old Listed Building Ref (II*): 88041
  • Old SAM County Ref: 418
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division: ST20SE6
  • SHINE Candidate (Yes)

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • CHAPEL (XIII to XVIII - 1300 AD to 1790 AD (Between))
  • CIDER HOUSE (XIV to XVIII - 1400 AD to 1790 AD (Between))

Full description

Clements, H. A., Report on Buildings at Risk in the Devon Part of the Blackdown Hills, 22, 94 (Report - non-specific). SDV344049.

Risk level 3. Poor condition (B.A.R. 2.2.3).


English Heritage, 15/01/2015, Survey to Amend and Update Membury Court and Surrounding Buildings and Structures (Correspondence). SDV357671.

English Heritage are undertaking a survey to look at amending and updating the entries for Membury Court and surrounding buildings and structures on the National Heritage List for England. This includes an assessment to de-schedule the Chapel.


Pevsner, N., 1952, The Buildings of England: South Devon, 206 (Monograph). SDV336217.

The remains of Membury Chapel, the east window and piscina, are of 14th century date.


Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, 1953 - 1979, ST20SE6 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV337302.

The chapel at Membury Court is approximately 16 metres by 6 metres, occupying the east end of a large barn with, externally, no straight joint to indicate its original length. Both barn and chapel are of rubble construction with a few ashlar blocks at and near the base of the walling. The building with its east and south windows, is in a good state of preservation.


Seymour, D. J., 1955 - 1958, The Smaller Manor Houses of Medieval Devon, 13 (Article in Serial). SDV6523.


Rigold, S. E., 1957, Untitled Source (Correspondence). SDV337305.


Ministry of Works, 1959, Chapel at Membury Court (Schedule Document). SDV337332.

Remains of 14th century chapel north of farmhouse at Membury Court. Fine east window of three lights with shafted rear arch. South window of two lights. Piscina. Remains of wooden screen and portion of one roof truss. The roof is modern with a corrugated iron covering but it is weather-proof. There are a number of fractures in the flint rubble walls at the east end. Floor inserted and used as a store and barn. Other details: Monument 418.


Department of Environment, 1960, Axminster RD, 20 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV337333.

Now used as a shed. Rubble with ashlar quoins. Most of roof timbering destroyed.


Alcock, N. W., 1981, Cruck Construction: An Introduction and Catalogue, 110 (Report - non-specific). SDV342504.

Jointed cruck recorded (citing Everett).


Department of Environment, 1984, 62: Part of East Devon, 116 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV326854.


Robinson, 1986, Chapel at Membury Court (Site Visit). SDV337335.


Keystone Historic Buildings Consultants, 1993, Membury Court, Devon. Medieval House and Chapel, 95 (Report - Survey). SDV337301.

Remains of original (circa 1290 - 1300) chapel confined to masonry of eastern 6 metres or so of existing building. Main surviving features of 13th century chapel are position of front (south) doorway into 2nd bay from east end - the 'nave' of the old chapel, and the two windows and other fixtures of the 'chancel' in the east end bay. Large east window is a fine example of its time. 'Chancel' bay is remarkably complete. Original length of chapel may only be discovered by excavation. The oldest carpentry dates from a major refurbishment whilst still in religious use. From this phase is a very interesting chancel screen, extensive e evidence for a chamber over the 'nave' and the remains of a jointed cruck roof truss. Some masonry may be 15th century. For instance the west side of the main door predates the 18th century but is not 13th century. Appears to have ceased religious usage in mid 16th century. In 1649-50 survey it is described as a chapel, but with implication that it was used as a stable with loft over. 1795 survey describes "the old chapel now turn'd into a cyder house most of it new built". This accords with the physical evidence for a major rebuild resulting in the building as it survives today with some 20th century repairs.


Department of National Heritage, 1994, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV337337.

Scheduled Monument consent granted for various repair and reinstatement works to the south elevation, the demolition of attached modern dairy at south west corner, and replacement of two first floor 20th century metal framed windows with new basic timber frames with fixed glazing.


Department of National Heritage, 1997, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV337338.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for works comprising the repointing of a small area of the south wall; the removal of a modern, wooden first floor inserted above the chancel and across the east window; the removal of concrete and rubble infill to the lower half of the east window; and the glazing of the east window with plain glass.


Devon County Council, 1997-2002, Buildings at Risk Survey in the Devon Part of the Blackdown Hills AONB (Un-published). SDV344048.

Early 14th century chapel used as a farm store. Corrugated metal roof. Recently inspected by an English Heritage engineer, the building is considered to be stable althugh the iron tie bar at first floor level will eventually need to be replaced.


Child, P., 1998, Chapel at Membury Court (Correspondence). SDV347044.

Diamond shaped window glass panes of pre-17th century date found.
Royal Albert Memorial Museum holds a medieval carved label stop in the form of a head, which came from Membury Court Chapel. This was retrieved some years ago from a heap of building rubble. A second head was not retrieved.


English Heritage, 20/02/2015, Chapel at Membury Court, Membury Court, Membury, Axminster (Correspondence). SDV357892.

A request to the Heritage Data Management team for minor amendments to the list entries at Membury Court, Membury, Devon has been forwarded to us. Given the number of buildings involved, this work has been taken forward as a project to reassess and amend the following designated buildings/ monuments: Membury Court (Grade II*, UID: 1424636); Former chapel immediately N of Membury Court (Grade II*, UID: 1424635); Chapel at Membury Court (Scheduled Monument, UID: 1424634); Linhay immediately W of Membury Court (Grade II, UID: 1424632); Barn approx. 50yds W of Membury Court (Grade II, UID: 1424633); Bridge immediately S of Membury Court (Grade II, UID: 1424631).

There is evidence of Romano-British occupation in the vicinity of Membury Court, and a Roman villa site was excavated in the field to the north of the former medieval chapel in 2014. At Domesday (1086), Membury Court was the manor house of the Manor of Membury, and was given to Goldcliff Priory in Monmouthshire by owner Robert de Chandos in 1113. Under the priory it was farmed by various individuals, possibly including Benedictines. A tax survey of Membury in 1324 noted a manor court house and two mills, and payment to a ‘clerik’. Although there was no mention of a chapel it is thought to have been constructed in the late C13/ early C14. The Manor reverted to the Crown in 1414 when the alien priories were suppressed, and subsequently it was granted to the Duke of Warwick who annexed it to the Abbey of Tewkesbury. The Manor of Membury was presented by the Crown to the Dean and
Chapter of Windsor in 1474, and continued in their possession until it was transferred to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners in 1867. The earliest surviving fabric within the house at Membury Court, in the medieval hall house roof, probably dates to the late C14 or early C15. The chapel was altered in the C15, with the insertion of a first floor, possibly when the adjacent hall house was extended to the east.

The first reference to a chapel on the site is in a 1560 survey when Membury Court was under
the ownership of the Chace or Chase family, which states “cum capella adiacent” (“with adjacent chapel”). Later investigation has shown that the structure probably dates to the early C14. A 1649-50 survey describes a chapel but suggests that it was used as a stable with a loft above. By the time of a 1795 survey it is described as “The Old Chapel now turn’d into a Cyder House most of it new built”.

The building is shown on historic maps from the 1840 tithe. Adaptations to the cider house were made in the C19 and C20, and by the early C21 it was being used to house livestock, when the roof structure was replaced. An archaeological investigation of the building took place in 2006, prior to its conversion to domestic use.

Details
Principal Elements
A former chapel of circa late-thirteenth century date, constructed of stone, with fifteenth century adaptations. It was converted into a cider house in the eighteenth century.

Details
Broadly rectangular on plan, the above ground strucutre is partly two storey and has a domestic use in the twenty-first century. It is constructed of rubble stone and flint with sandstone quoins. The two medieval windows are of better quality sandstone, probably imported from Somerset. There is some oak framing and an oak cider press with cast-iron fittings. The east end is thirteenth century masonry, with other walls being largely of eighteenth century date.

Internally, the medieval floor has been removed, but medieval footings and post-holes were found at the east end during a limited excavation and evaluation in 2006. Further medieval structural remains probably survive below ground elsewhere within the monument. Remains in the west end include a pre-1790 stone-lined drain, a eighteenth century cobble and stone chip floor, eighteenth century footings and a nineteenth/ twentieth century drain. In the central bay is evidence of a nineteenth/ twentieth century cobble floor. The full extent of the medieval chapel is not known. Finds on the site have mainly been eighteenth or nineteenth century earthenware, although a small number have been of sixteenth or seventeenth century date. Above ground, there are thirteenth century chapel features and fittings including two windows, an image shelf, lamp bracket and piscina. The east wall has the shadow image of an altar table in the medieval plaster. Parts of the fifteenth century chancel screen, crosswall and upper chamber remain. There is also the remains of a sixteenth century cruck truss
embedded in the south wall. A cider press at the west end is probably eighteenth century with
nineteenth century alterations.


English Heritage, 20/02/2015, Former Chapel immediately North of Membury Court, Membury, Axminster (Correspondence). SDV357898.

English Heritage has completed the initial assessment of the former chapel to consider whether its entry on the List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest should be revised.

A circa late-C13 chapel, adapted in the late C15 and partly-rebuilt in circa 1790 to form a cider house. It was updated in the C20 and early C21.

MATERIALS: constructed of rubble stone and flint with sandstone quoins. The two medieval windows are of better quality sandstone, probably imported from Somerset. There is some oak framing and an oak cider press with cast-iron fittings.

PLAN: broadly rectangular on plan, the building has a concave arc in the north wall towards the west end. There is an inserted first floor in the central bays accessed by an internal stair.

EXTERIOR: the main elevation is loosely of four bays with two door openings to left and right of centre. The doors have timber lintels and windows above, with a larger opening between them at upper level. The doors each have two stone steps. To the right is a stone chapel window with two trefoil-headed lights and Decorated tracery with a quatrefoil, within a c.6m length of C13 wall. It has a partially-intact hoodmould and the central mullion is a C21 replacement. The upper courses of the elevation are C21 tiles and there are two pigeon holes lined in red brick. Three beam ends protrude from the wall around the left window opening. The east gable-end wall is C13 with a central chapel window with three trefoil-headed lights and Decorated tracery with a hexafoil. It has a hoodmould with weathered label stops carved as human heads. The south slope of the roof has a C13 low parapet with sandstone coping.
The ashlar quoins to the medieval structure (and some re-used at the C18 west end) have narrow chamfered corners. The north wall of the medieval chapel is stone and flint. The C18 stonework of the cider house neatly adjoins the medieval elevations, and in the north wall curves into a central bay where there is a taking-in door opening (widened in the C20 and now a three-light window). To the right of the opening an iron joist protrudes. Further right the wall curves out to form a semicircular feature to accommodate the cider press within. The upper courses of the elevation are C21 tiles. The north-west corner of the building is attached to the curved rear wall of a former late-C18/ early-C19 horse engine-house, constructed of coursed stone and flint block. The west end wall has a door to the right and an opening to the left with a re-used C17 three-light window frame with ovolo-moulded timber mullions. There is a small opening above and to the left, with a timber lintel. The three-light opening is set within a section of wall that curves inwards, probably to accommodate the horse engine. The roof is covered in C21 thatch.

INTERIOR: the east bays are the former chancel and have a raised floor height at the location of a C15 chancel screen, a freestanding oak frame 2.24m high. It has a central doorway with chamfered jambs step-stopped at the top. The chamfer has been cut back at lower level for the passing of barrels. The framing to the north of the doorway is of C21 date. To the south is a middle rail with a low plank and muntin screen below, and central mullion above. The muntins and mullion are chamfered with step stops. A series of oak joists sit in notches along the top of the headbeam, and span the bay to the west to a chamfered crossbeam with step stops. Modern joists extend across the next bay, supported by two cast-iron joist reinforcements that span the width of the building. Above the screen is part of a crosswall. It survives as a cill and two upright studs with a squint window and top rail. The window contains three timber mullions of octagonal section. One panel of wattle-and-daub infill remains. The
frame is not in its original position. 150mm to the east of the frame, embedded in the south wall, is a cruck post from a side-pegged jointed cruck truss, probably of late-C15 date. The other first-floor structure and stair are of C21 construction. At the east (chancel) end, the C13 window is flanked by engaged shafts with moulded bases and capitals, and has a cob cill. The hoodmould has label stops carved as human heads. The southern head is a defaced mitred bishop. The northern head is a young monk with oriental eyes (a favoured C13 feature). The stone shelf to the left of the window has canted corners and a moulded soffit, and is probably a shelf for an image. To the right is another small shelf with a similar moulding, possibly a lamp bracket. To the right of this shelf, and in the northwall, are square recesses, probably putlog holes for scaffolding. The medieval walls are covered in plaster, probably of C15 date, that stops below the east window, around a shadow-image of an altar table. The south wall has an arched piscina to the left of the window. The splayed embrasure of the south window has graffiti including geometric shapes that may be original masons marks. The left jamb of the south-east door is of C13 date.

At the west end is an axial, step-stopped, chamfered beam of large scantling. It is attached to the first-floor structure and the west end wall, and is probably C16/ C17 and reused. It has joist slots showing the south-west of the building was previously floored. A cider press is set in a rubble stone plinth at the north-west end. Its large size indicates the need for the projecting recess in the wall behind it. It is probably of C18 date with C19 adaptations including the introduction of a cast-iron screw. Above the west end are the reordered remains of historic roof structure. The modern roof above is timber-lined and strengthened using steel yacht ties. The floor coverings to the building are C21 lime ash/ blue lias slabs.


Devon and Somerset County Councils, 2000-2002, Historic Farmsteads Database, BH150.4 (Machine readable data file). SDV349681.

Cider house. Originally in domestic use. Later a cider house. A 15th century chapel positioned to the rear (north) of the farmhouse was rebuilt and possibly extended to the west in the late 18th century to form a cider house. It is deeply terraced into the hillslope to the rear. To the west of the cider house was a horse engine house. The curved rear wall remains. Hamstone dressings; Limestone; Rubble stone, brick / concrete block repairs. Limestone ashlar quoins and coping to east end. Rubblestone. Hamstone dressings to original windows. Some 20th century repairs in concrete block. Corrugated iron roof. A-frame; cruck truss. The original roof was of jointed cruck construction. There are the remains of a jointed cruck post, ending on a padstone, in the north wall of the chapel. It has a slot for a slip tenon. The 20th century 5-bay replacement roof is of A-frame trusses, with mortise and tenon, pegged X-apexes. The collars are lap-jointed and the ridge is double. There are 2 sets of replacement back purlins. Horse engine. Door/s; Loading hatch; Pigeon holes; Timber window/s. The cider house is gable-ended to the east, with stone coping, and hipped to the west. The front, facing the house, has two doors. Both are ledged doors hung on strap hinges in solid, pegged frames. The two windows at first floor level are 20th century insertions, and the loading hatch door is probably a replacement for an earlier one. There are two paired pigeon holes lined in red brick. In the east end wall of the chapel is a fine decorated window. In the west end wall there is a ledge and brace door on strap hinges and 2 windows. There is a 17th century 3-light window frame with ovolo-moulded mullions reused from a domestic context, and to its left a small, unglazed window opening. To the rear an 18th century loading hatch has been adapted to a wide doorway in the 20th century. Apple loft; other. The two centre bays have a first floor chamber dating from the 15th century, with part of a framed crosswall with a squint, overlooking the chancel of the former chapel. The 3 western bays of the cider house are partially floored to the south of a large chamfered axial beam with step stops. The north section was left open to the roof to accommodate a large cider press, which still survives. A timber stair below the rear loading doors gives access to the loft and chamber. Cider press. The cider press has a single screw. It is possible that it is the original 18th century press which may have been adapted in the 19th century. Currently disused.


Thorp, J., 2003, Membury Court, BH150008 (Ground Photograph). SDV352186.


Thorp, J., 2003, Membury Court, BH150021-BH150024 (Un-published). SDV352187.


Devon Buildings Group, 2005, Devon Buildings Group 2005 Conference. Farms in the Blackdown Hills (Un-published). SDV340140.

The chapel is an important example of a late 13th century domestic chapel, with 15th century alterations. Constructed of local chert rubble stone with sandstone quoins, coping and dressings. It comprises a one bay chancel open to the roof and a nave to the west, with a chamber above. The 13th century features include the position of the south doorway, two Decorated windows and the chancel fixtures including an image bracket, lamp bracket, shadow image of the altar and remains of a piscina. Important survivals from the 15th century include the chancel screen and the framed crosswall of a first floor nave chamber above, with a window overlooking the chancel. It was possibly extended further to the west in the 18th century and converted into a cider house. The cider press survives.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2006, Proposed Works at Membury Court (Correspondence). SDV337341.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted, subject to conditions, in respect of proposed works concerning conservation of the existing structure including new roof, floors, repairs to screen, masonry, windows, doors and provision of drainage.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2007, Proposed Works at Membury Court (Correspondence). SDV338215.

Amendment to Scheduled Monument Consent letter of 3rd November 2006 to include underfloor heating and north wall window within the proposed works.


National Monuments Record, 2011, 1405578 (National Monuments Record Database). SDV346407.

Group of farm buildings at Membury Court. The structure immediately north of the farmhouse was built as a chapel in the early 14th century and is now used as a cider store.


English Heritage, 2011, Historic Houses Register (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV346128.

Former chapel immediately north of Membury Court, now used as farm building. Built in the early 14th century of stone rubble under a corrugated iron roof. West end hipped, east end gabled with stone coping and early 14th century traceried three-light window, the hood mould with head stops exposed. The inside of this window has nook shafts and corbel heads. Another 14th century two-light traceried window on south side. Also on south side plank doors with loft openings above. Interior: Lower half of jointed cruck truss. Chamfered ceiling beam with step stops. Part of screen closed on first floor with wattle and daub with four-light opening with chamfered mullions. Section of screen below on ground floor has chamfered plank and muntin wainscot, open above with chamfered posts with step stops. Simple piscina on south wall with chamfered pointed arch. Two corbel stones on east wall.


Ordnance Survey, 2013, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV350786.


Historic England, 2015, National Heritage List for England (National Heritage List for England). SDV358087.

See listing description for full details.


Historic England, 22/06/2015, Membury Court Project Decision Notifications: Former Chapel (Correspondence). SDV358636.

After examining all the records and other relevant information and having carefully considered the
architectural and historic interest of this case, the former chapel at Membury Court continues to merit listing
at Grade II*, and an amended description should be issued.
REASONS FOR DESIGNATION DECISION
An amendment for the Grade II* listed former chapel at Membury Court, Membury, Devon, a late-C13/
early-C14 chapel, converted to a cider house in the late C18, is recommended for the following principal
reasons:
* Clarity: to more fully describe the building and articulate its special interest in line with current
practice.

After examining all the records and other relevant information and having carefully considered the
architectural and historic interest of this case, the below ground remains of the former chapel at Membury
Court continues to merit scheduling, and an amended description should be issued.
REASONS FOR DESIGNATION DECISION
An amendment for the Schedule for the chapel at Membury Court, Membury, Devon, a medieval chapel,
converted to a cider house in the late C18, is recommended for the following principal reasons:
* Dual designation: to comply with the current government policy of removing multiple designations of
the same structure. In this case, to be achieved by reducing the extent of the scheduling to below ground,
and retaining the above ground structure as a listed building;
* Clarity: to more fully describe the nationally important monument in line with current practice.

See advice reports for full details.


Everett, A. W., c1960, Chapel at Membury Court (Un-published). SDV337336.

Survey drawings of Membury Court chapel showing remaining portion of original partition between the chapel and an upper room in its western part. Also, the four-light 'squint' through which those in the upper room could take part in the divine office being said in the chapel. Below the squint are some interesting remains of wattle and daub work; while above the squint similar work remains almost intact. Drawing of upper portion of east window of chapel. Circa 1270.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV326854List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1984. 62: Part of East Devon. Historic Houses Register. A4 Spiral Bound. 116.
SDV336217Monograph: Pevsner, N.. 1952. The Buildings of England: South Devon. The Buildings of England: South Devon. Paperback Volume. 206.
SDV337301Report - Survey: Keystone Historic Buildings Consultants. 1993. Membury Court, Devon. Medieval House and Chapel. Keystone Historic Buildings Consultants Report. K431. A4 Stapled + Digital. 95.
SDV337302Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. 1953 - 1979. ST20SE6. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
SDV337305Correspondence: Rigold, S. E.. 1957. Letter to Lady Fox. Letter.
SDV337332Schedule Document: Ministry of Works. 1959. Chapel at Membury Court. The Schedule of Monuments. A4 Stapled.
SDV337333List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1960. Axminster RD. Historic Houses Register. A4 Spiral Bound. 20.
SDV337335Site Visit: Robinson. 1986. Chapel at Membury Court. Field Monument Warden Visit. Not Applicable.
SDV337336Un-published: Everett, A. W.. c1960. Chapel at Membury Court. A3 Stapled.
SDV337337Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1994. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Proposed Works at Chapel at Membury Court. A4 Stapled.
SDV337338Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1997. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Proposed Works at Chapel at Membury Court. A4 Stapled.
SDV337341Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2006. Proposed Works at Membury Court. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. A4 Stapled.
SDV338215Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2007. Proposed Works at Membury Court. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV340140Un-published: Devon Buildings Group. 2005. Devon Buildings Group 2005 Conference. Farms in the Blackdown Hills. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV342504Report - non-specific: Alcock, N. W.. 1981. Cruck Construction: An Introduction and Catalogue. Council for British Archaeology Research Report. 42. Photocopy. 110.
SDV344048Un-published: Devon County Council. 1997-2002. Buildings at Risk Survey in the Devon Part of the Blackdown Hills AONB. Buildings at Risk Survey in the Devon Part of the Blackdown Hills AONB. Mixed Archive Material + Digital.
SDV344049Report - non-specific: Clements, H. A.. Report on Buildings at Risk in the Devon Part of the Blackdown Hills. Devon County Council Report. A4 Comb Bound + Digital. 22, 94.
SDV346128List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: English Heritage. 2011. Historic Houses Register. Historic Houses Register. Website.
SDV346407National Monuments Record Database: National Monuments Record. 2011. 1405578. National Monuments Record Database. Website.
SDV347044Correspondence: Child, P.. 1998. Chapel at Membury Court. Letter from Historic Environment Service. A4 Single Sheet.
SDV349681Machine readable data file: Devon and Somerset County Councils. 2000-2002. Historic Farmsteads Database. BH150.4.
SDV350786Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2013. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital. [Mapped feature: #95488 ]
SDV352186Ground Photograph: Thorp, J.. 2003. Membury Court. Blackdown Hills Historic Farmstead Survey. Digital. BH150008.
SDV352187Un-published: Thorp, J.. 2003. Membury Court. Blackdown Hills Historic Farmstead Survey. Digital. BH150021-BH150024.
SDV357671Correspondence: English Heritage. 15/01/2015. Survey to Amend and Update Membury Court and Surrounding Buildings and Structures. Asssess Building for Amending. Digital.
SDV357892Correspondence: English Heritage. 20/02/2015. Chapel at Membury Court, Membury Court, Membury, Axminster. Completed Assessment. Digital.
SDV357898Correspondence: English Heritage. 20/02/2015. Former Chapel immediately North of Membury Court, Membury, Axminster. Completed Assessment. Digital.
SDV358087National Heritage List for England: Historic England. 2015. National Heritage List for England. Website.
SDV358636Correspondence: Historic England. 22/06/2015. Membury Court Project Decision Notifications: Former Chapel. Notification of Designation Decision. Digital.
SDV6523Article in Serial: Seymour, D. J.. 1955 - 1958. The Smaller Manor Houses of Medieval Devon. Transactions of the Torquay Natural History Society. 12. Unknown. 13.

Associated Monuments

MDV104858Part of: Membury Court (Building)
MDV73004Related to: Datestone on Mounting Block, Membury Court (Monument)
MDV1928Related to: Farmhouse, Membury Court (Building)
MDV27190Related to: Footbridge, Membury Court (Building)
MDV53858Related to: Linhay, Membury Court (Building)
MDV73003Related to: Mounting Block, Membury Court (Monument)
MDV27188Related to: Open Fronted Shelter, Membury Court (Monument)
MDV47341Related to: Orchard to north of Membury Court (Monument)
MDV53860Related to: Pigsty, Membury Court (Monument)
MDV53859Related to: Riding Horse Stable and Trap House, Membury Court (Monument)
MDV27189Related to: Threshing Barn, Membury Court (Building)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV4580 - Buildings at Risk Survey
  • EDV4654 - Buildings at Risk Re-Survey

Date Last Edited:Sep 24 2015 8:36AM