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HER Number:MDV57252
Name:PARACHUTE STORE in the Parish of Clayhidon

Summary

The most significant building to have been demolished at upottery airfield was the almost unique parachute store. This featured a standard air ministry temporary brick hut with a steel-framed parachute drying tower erected against an end wall. The tower was 29 feet wide and 30 feet high, enabling a large number of parachutes to be hung simultaneously. One of the main problems with parachutes was condensation and therefore to prevent shrinkage they had to be dried out. This design was quite an improvement on other parachute stores as it significantly reduced drying time by having the parachutes suspended from a greater height.(figure 29). All that remains today is the concrete hut base and sawn off steel stanchions of the framework of the drying tower (francis).

Location

Grid Reference:ST 193 105
Map Sheet:ST11SE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishClayhidon
DistrictMid Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishCLAYHIDON

Protected Status: none recorded

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: ST11SE/89/27

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • PARACHUTE STORE (World War II - 1939 AD to 1945 AD (Between))

Full description

Untitled Source (Migrated Record). SDV36666.

Francis, p. /blackdown hills airfield survey/(1995).


Francis, P., 1995, Blackdown Hills Airfield Survey. Dunkeswell and Upottery., 105 (Report - Survey). SDV312951.

The most significant building to have been demolished at upottery airfield was the almost unique parachute store. This featured a standard air ministry temporary brick hut with a steel-framed parachute drying tower erected against an end wall. The tower was 29 feet wide and 30 feet high, enabling a large number of parachutes to be hung simultaneously. One of the main problems with parachutes was condensation and therefore to prevent shrinkage they had to be dried out. This design was quite an improvement on other parachute stores as it significantly reduced drying time by having the parachutes suspended from a greater height.(figure 29). All that remains today is the concrete hut base and sawn off steel stanchions of the framework of the drying tower (francis).

Sources / Further Reading

SDV312951Report - Survey: Francis, P.. 1995. Blackdown Hills Airfield Survey. Dunkeswell and Upottery.. Blackdown Hills AONB. Digital + A4. 105.
SDV36666Migrated Record:

Associated Monuments

MDV47202Part of: Upottery Airfield (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV4948 - Blackdown Hills Airfield Survey

Date Last Edited:Sep 30 2015 5:07PM