HeritageGateway - Home
Site Map
Text size: A A A
You are here: Home > > > > Devon & Dartmoor HER Result
Devon & Dartmoor HERPrintable version | About Devon & Dartmoor HER | Visit Devon & Dartmoor HER online...

See important guidance on the use of this record.

If you have any comments or new information about this record, please email us.


HER Number:MDV58107
Name:Northern tinwork at Black Tor, Walkhampton

Summary

The northern tinwork is the most extensive of the three, and includes at least 3 broad lines of pits, a prospecting trench and an oval structure which may represent a tinners' shelter or very small reservoir. Compared with the s tinwork the liens of pits are much broader and less clearly defined, but it is possible the resolve them into 3 areas. The northern of these is 300m long and includes at least 22 pits varying in size from 0.3 cubic m to 6/53 cubic m. The small size of the pits suggests that they are all prospecting pits. The wsw to ene alignment of these pits is not what one might expect of a speculative prospecting venture and it seems most plausible that they were excavated to examine the character, quality and extent of a known lode.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 573 719
Map Sheet:SX57SE
Admin AreaDartmoor National Park
Civil ParishWalkhampton
DistrictWest Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishWALKHAMPTON

Protected Status: none recorded

Other References/Statuses

  • National Monuments Record: SX57SE247
  • National Record of the Historic Environment: 1461907
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX57SE/125/9

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • EXTRACTIVE PIT (Post Medieval to Early 20th Century - 1540 AD to 1901 AD (Between))
  • PROSPECTING PIT (Post Medieval to Early 20th Century - 1540 AD to 1901 AD (Between))
  • STREAMWORKS (Post Medieval to Early 20th Century - 1540 AD to 1901 AD (Between))

Full description

Gerrard, S., 1997, Black Tor, fig 6 (Article in Serial). SDV360978.

Gerrard, S., 1997, Meavy Valley Archaeology Interim Report for 1996, 22;fig 10 (Report - Survey). SDV360393.

SX 573 719 The northern tinwork is the most extensive of the three, and includes at least three broad lines of pits, a prospecting trench and an oval structure which may represent a tinners' shelter or very small reservoir. Compared with the southern tinwork the lines of pits are much broader and less clearly defined, but it is possible the resolve them into three areas.
The northern of these is 300m long and includes at least 22 pits varying in size from 0.3 cubic metres to 6.53 cubic metres. The small size of the pits suggests that they are all prospecting pits. The west-south-west to east-north-east alignment of these pits is not what one might expect of a speculative prospecting venture and it seems most plausible that they were excavated to examine the character, quality and extent of a known lode.
The second lode within this area appears to have been more successful, and at least some mining appears to have been carried out. There are 34 pits in this area extending over 240m, and whilst all but three are probably prospecting pits, one is substantial and may represent a shamm shaft, although there is no trace of an adit and it is probably most sensible to view this pit as the beginnings of a lode-back type tinwork which failed to develop beyond the digging of the first couple of pits.
A similar picture emerges from the third lode where most of the pits are of the prospecting type, but in one area a number of large pits situated next to each other suggests that some of the lode material was extracted.
At one location a substantial trench was excavated across the line of the anticipated lodes. This 80m long trench was excavated by hand with the spoil being upcast to form a bank on the north-east side. The relative date of this prospecting venture to at least one of the pits within this tinwork is provided by the leat which cuts through the area. This leat which may have served the e lode-back tinwork cuts through the prospecting trench and partly cuts the spoil dump from pit 22. Therefore, the pit and trench are both earlier than the leat, which in turn is either contemporary with or earlier than the e lode-back tinwork.
The final feature is a 'U'-shaped 3.3m wide and 0.6m high bank with a centrally placed 1m wide gap. The interior of this structure is 6.8m long by 4.7m wide and whilst its shape may suggest that it is a reservoir it seems too small, and no trace of a feeder leat survives. It may be a tinners' shelter, with the e facing gap representing a doorway and whilst this seems the most likely interpretation it is not possible to be certain.

Bluesky, 2006 - 2007, Bluesky aerial photographs 2006 - 2007 (Aerial Photograph). SDV341189.

Faintly visible on the aerial photography when comparing with Gerrard's fig. 6 (Black Tor, 1997).

Fletcher, M. J., 2007-2008, Walkhampton Premier Archaeological Landscape; Field Investigation Project (Report - Survey). SDV359195.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV341189Aerial Photograph: Bluesky. 2006 - 2007. Bluesky aerial photographs 2006 - 2007. Bluesky. Photograph (Digital). [Mapped feature: #130328 ]
SDV359195Report - Survey: Fletcher, M. J.. 2007-2008. Walkhampton Premier Archaeological Landscape; Field Investigation Project. English Heritage. Unknown.
SDV360393Report - Survey: Gerrard, S.. 1997. Meavy Valley Archaeology Interim Report for 1996. A4 Comb Bound + Digital. 22;fig 10.
SDV360978Article in Serial: Gerrard, S.. 1997. Black Tor. Meavy Valley Archaeology. 5. A4 Stapled + Digital. fig 6.

Associated Monuments

MDV58106Related to: Eastern tinwork at Black Tor, Walkhampton (Monument)
MDV58105Related to: The southern lode-back tinwork at Black Tor, Walkhampton (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV7517 - Survey of Hart Tor tin works
  • EDV7522 - Survey of Black Tor
  • EDV8351 - Walkhampton Premier Archaeological Landscape; Field Investigation Project

Date Last Edited:May 17 2021 10:36AM