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HER Number:MDV78220
Name:Civilian Hangar, Exeter Airfield

Summary

Hangar built in 1939. Roof structure retains evidence of World War II enemy action. Extended post-war. In good condition.

Location

Grid Reference:SY 000 932
Map Sheet:SY09SW
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishClyst Honiton
DistrictEast Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishCLYST HONITON

Protected Status: none recorded

Other References/Statuses: none recorded

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • HANGAR (World War II to XXI - 1939 AD to 2010 AD (Between))

Full description

Royal Air Force, 1946 - 1949, Royal Air Force Aerial Photographs (Aerial Photograph). SDV342938.


Francis, P., 1999, Exeter Airport. Historic Airport Survey for Devon County Council & East Devon District Council, 79 (Report - non-specific). SDV323390.

Large civilian hangar designed by Henning & Chitty. Built in 1939 by A & J Maain Ltd, and paid for by the Air Ministry. Built to house the reserve school aircraft and workshops. It is an end-opening shed (one end only) with cantilever type roof trusses at 25 foot centres which are separated by (equal pitch) lattice girders at 14 foot centres. This structural design creates a clear floor space of 152 foot by 99 foot without the need for internal columns.
Single-storey office and workshop accommodation in the form of a side and rear annexe allowed for a future hangar extension to be built agains the south-west elevation without interfering with the original building. The school was not expanded and the extension was never built. The office annexe and elevation projected out towards the airfield, and this section was two-storey, partly to give the necessary height required for parachutes to be hung up to dry by their auspices, and partly for additional office space. Directly below the first floor offices at the front was the timekeeper's and the chief flying instructor's offices. Behind this was the lower part of the parachute store and a boiler house. Other rooms along the side annexe were stores for armaments and clothes, toilets, a photography lan and the main entrance to the annexe. Stores and workshops associated with the fleet of aircraft operated by the school were all located within the rear annexe as well as locker rooms for the pupils. The annexe has a cavity brick wall, the two-storey section has internal brick piers to support the first floor.
Today the front of the angar has been extended by 16 feet 6 inches, creating an inside length of 115 feet 6 inches. The hangar was badly damaged during air-rainds in April-May 1941, requiring extensive reconstruction. Evidence of enemy action can still b e found as a few of the roof girders and trusses have bullet holes.
In good condition. Other details: Map 7, Plate 17, Site 242.


Ordnance Survey, 2010, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV344030.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV323390Report - non-specific: Francis, P.. 1999. Exeter Airport. Historic Airport Survey for Devon County Council & East Devon District Council. Airfield Research Publishing Report. Digital + A4. 79.
SDV342938Aerial Photograph: Royal Air Force. 1946 - 1949. Royal Air Force Aerial Photographs. Royal Air Force Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Digital).
SDV344030Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2010. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey. Map (Digital). [Mapped feature: #105121 ]

Associated Monuments

MDV48842Part of: Exeter Airfield (Military) (Monument)
MDV55686Part of: Exeter Airport (Civil) (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV4774 - Historic Airport Survey, Exeter Airport

Date Last Edited:Aug 27 2010 10:40AM