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HER Number:MDV7824
Name:The Church House Inn, Holne

Summary

Building dates to 1329, a number of alterations noted. The date it became a public house but Oliver Cromwell is said to have stayed here in the mid-17th century. Originally known as the Tavistock Inn. The first floor of the building and porch added in the 15th century. The main room, named after the author Charles Kingsley, includes 16th century oak screen and 18th century elm bench seat.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 706 695
Map Sheet:SX76NW
Admin AreaDartmoor National Park
Civil ParishHolne
DistrictSouth Hams
Ecclesiastical ParishHOLNE

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX76NW/29
  • Old Listed Building Ref (II)

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • CHURCH HOUSE (Constructed, XIV - 1329 AD to 1329 AD (Between))
  • INN (Altered, XVI to XVII - 1600 AD to 1699 AD? (Between))

Full description

Pearson, J. B., 1900, Church Houses in Devon, 210 (Article in Serial). SDV5752.

According to the records of the charity commissioners of 1818, the house was then let as an inn, the rent payable to the churchwardens.


Sheldon, L., 1937, Devon Inns, 386 (Article in Serial). SDV10197.

Little remains of the original interior, porch also rebuilt.


Copeland, G. W., 1962, Devonshire Church Houses: Part 3, 432-433, plate 47 (Article in Serial). SDV16091.

The Church House Inn, its gardens, the meadow known as Play Park and Stares-Nest Cottage and orchard are or were vested in trustees; the income being devoted to church purposes. The present inn, in the north-east corner of the churchyard, seems to be the descendant of the actual church house, modernised and enlarged. It is a moderately large rectangular building of two storeys, with a central two stage gabled porch, of good projection. The upper chamber with timber and plaster framing is quite foreign to Devon; it may be an addition to an earlier single stage porch, or added when the church house was converted into a private dwelling. Church houses with a porch are rare in Devon. Granite walling, colour washed. To the right of the porch is a prominent chimney breast with a lofty stack. In the porch are side benches, and the timber and plaster flat roof, continued in the passage beyond, has narrow moulded joists, evidently reproductions of the original ones in the main room. All the renewed wooden framed windows to the front, some transomed, are fillet and ovolo moulded, characteristic of the second half of the 16th century. The principal windows have seats inside. In the bar is part of a plank screen with narrow roll moulds to the panels, and across the ceiling are 3 well moulded large oak beams and narrow, close set, well moulded joists with small tongue like stops. The original fireplace survives; rectangular with a chamfered oak lintel and slightly chamfered granite jambs. The curved partition with settle before this fireplace is of later date. The present staircase is of the late 18th- early 19th century, not necessarily on the site of the original staircase. The rest of the interior has been modernised. Probably dates from 1529, mid-16th century being the earliest date from the stylistic evidence.


Department of Environment, 1986, Holne, 20 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV175668.

Public house, possibly originally the church house. Circa late 16th century with later rear wing and 20th century accretions of rear. Roughcast stone rubble. 20th century slate roof with gabled and hipped ends. Probably originally two storeys.
Three-room plan with three-bay central hall with small end rooms partitioned by screens. Entrance porch at left-hand bay of hall. Lateral hall stack at centre front and gable end stack. Later wing at rear of north end forming L-shaped plan. 19th century staircase put into back of left-hand bay of hall which has been partitioned off to create a stair hall, and partition inserted into front of hall to create a snug. 20th century accretions at rear and lean-to at north end. Two storeys. Five-window range. 20th century timber ovolo moulded 2, 3 and 4-light windows with leaded panes. Two-storey gabled porch with later sham timber framing to left of lateral stack at centre of front wall. Inner doorway has step stop chamfered timber lintel and 19th century panelled and glazed doors.
Interior: three bays of hall have three moulded ceiling beams with ovolo and two hollows. Similar head beams over end screens. The north screen has wide planks and muntin with bead moulding and moulded head beam with long pegs exposed. Some of the planks at one end have been removed. The south end screen might exist inside later partition. Similarly moulded joists in three bays of hall with concave scroll steps. The end room ceiling plastered over and fireplaces blocked. Front lateral hall fireplace with granite jambs and chamfered timber lintel, one end with bar step. Mid-19th century staircase inserted into south end of hall, with weathered hand rail and turned balusters. Roofs entirely replaced in late 19th century.


Waterhouse, R. E., 1991, The Church Houses of South Devon: an archaeological survey, 39-44 (Report - Survey). SDV7736.

The Church House Inn is aligned north/south. Traditionally thought to be built in 1329. It has a rectangular three room plan. Several different phases of construction and only a part of the front wall, the south gable, parts of the rear wall and the two screens being contemporary with the earliest phase of construction. The first phase saw the building constructed in granite rubble, on the three room plan. The solar appears to have been at the south end, its south wall being partially intact. The solar hearth occupies the south wall. A plain chamfered stud and panel screen divided the solar from the central lobby. This had a large hearth with a plain chamfered oak lintel in the east wall. The ceiling beams and joists are highly decorated. The beams are multiple bead-moulded. A beam moulded stud and panel screen with a door divided the lobby from the kitchen. The kitchen was at a slightly higher level than the lobby. The first floor hall was probably reached by an external stone stair from the rear of the building where the land rises. Only sawn off stubs now survive of the original plain a frame roof structure.
Phase 2 of construction consisted of the walls of the kitchen and the solar being reconstructed and the addition of a two storey half-timbered porch to the east front. The porch is 17th century, an unusual feature of a church house. The small room above the porch is known locally as the parberry. Substantial building works were carried out on repairs and extensions to the house in the 18th century. See plans for full details.
In phase 3 of construction a ceiling height 'snug' around the eastern lateral hearth was put in the lobby. A two storey wing was added. Other late 19th century alterations noted. See survey for further details.


Quick, T., 1992, Dartmoor Inns, 20-21 (Monograph). SDV359976.

Built in 1329, this building originally served as a priest's house. At this time it was a single storey building with thick granite walls and a thatched roof. The right hand end of the building was a stable but is now part of the public bar. Uncertain when it became a public house but it has belonged to the church since 1742 and was originally known as the Tavistock Inn. During the 15th century, the first floor was added, along with the porch way. The main room has a beautiful internal oak screen fitted in around 1530 and also has a long curved bench-seat made of elm, added in the 18th century. It is known as the Kingsley Room, after the author Charles Kingsley who was born at the nearby Vicarage.
Around 1800 the name was changed to the Church House Inn. Just over 100 years later, between 1908-1925 the roof of the building was raised and in 1925, the woodwork on the porch way was added and the old ecclesiastical window replaced. It is said that Oliver Cromwell stayed at the inn during the battle of Totnes in the Civil War.


Ordnance Survey, 2017, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV359962.

Modern map depicts the Inn.


Historic England, 2017, National Heritage List for England, Accessed 16/01/2017 (National Heritage List for England). SDV359963.

HOLNE - SX 76 NW - 4/25 Church House Inn - GV II
Public house, possibly originally the church house. Circa late C16 with later rear wing and C20 accretions of rear. Roughcast stone rubble. C20 slate roof with gabled and hipped ends. Probably originally 2 storeys.
3-room plan with 3-bay central hall with small end rooms partitioned by screens. Entrance porch at left- hand bay of hall. Lateral hall stack at centre front and gable end stack. Later wing at rear of north end forming L-shaped plan. C19 staircase put into back of left-hand bay of hall which has been partitioned off to create a stair hall, and partition inserted into front of hall to create a snug. C20 accretions at rear and lean-to at north end. 2 storeys. 5-window range. C20 timber ovolo moulded 2, 3 and 4-light windows with leaded panes. 2-storey gabled porch with later sham timber framing to left of lateral stack at centre of front wall. Inner doorway has step stop chamfered timber lintel and C19 panelled and glazed doors.
Interior: 3 bays of hall have 3 moulded ceiling beams with ovolo and 2 hollows. Similar head beams over end screens. The north screen has wide planks and muntin with bead moulding and moulded head beam with long pegs exposed. Some of the planks at one end have been removed. The south end screen might exist inside later partition. Similarly moulded joists in 3 bays of hall with concave scroll steps. The end room ceiling plastered over and fireplaces blocked. Front lateral hall fireplace with granite jambs and chamfered timber lintel, one end with bar step. Mid C19 staircase inserted into south end of hall, with weathered hand rail and turned balusters. Roofs entirely replaced in late C19.
Listing NGR: SX7061169510.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV10197Article in Serial: Sheldon, L.. 1937. Devon Inns. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 69. A5 Hardback. 386.
SDV16091Article in Serial: Copeland, G. W.. 1962. Devonshire Church Houses: Part 3. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 94. A5 Hardback. 432-433, plate 47.
SDV175668List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1986. Holne. Historic Houses Register. Unknown. 20.
SDV359962Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2017. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital. [Mapped feature: #105136 ]
SDV359963National Heritage List for England: Historic England. 2017. National Heritage List for England. Historic Houses Register. Digital. Accessed 16/01/2017.
SDV359976Monograph: Quick, T.. 1992. Dartmoor Inns. Dartmoor Inns. Paperback Volume. 20-21.
SDV5752Article in Serial: Pearson, J. B.. 1900. Church Houses in Devon. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 32. A5 Hardback. 210.
SDV7736Report - Survey: Waterhouse, R. E.. 1991. The Church Houses of South Devon: an archaeological survey. A4 Stapled + Digital. 39-44.

Associated Monuments

MDV47964Related to: Former school (now Village Hall), Holne (Building)
MDV7788Related to: St. Mary's Parish Church, Holne (Building)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events: none recorded


Date Last Edited:Mar 22 2018 10:08AM