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HER Number:MDV7876
Name:St. Andrew's Parish Church, Ashburton

Summary

15th century building with some features of earlier church incorporated. Date of early church uncertain. Referred to in document written in 1186-1191. In two early 14th century documents the church seems to have consisted of a dilapidated early chancel, a central tower, and a dark nave aisled on both sides. Probably cruciform. Graves found under the floor during works in 2015, including one in the south transept.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 755 697
Map Sheet:SX76NE
Admin AreaDartmoor National Park
Civil ParishAshburton
DistrictTeignbridge
Ecclesiastical ParishASHBURTON

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Church of England HER: 615292
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX76NE/20

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • PARISH CHURCH (XII to XV - 1186 AD to 1499 AD (Between))
  • GRAVE (XV to XIX - 1500 AD? to 1840 AD (Between))

Full description

Amery, J. S., 1873, Acoustic Jars in St. Andrews, Ashburton, 203-5 (Article in Serial). SDV295510.

Discovered during renovation in 1838. About ten jars of common red clay in the north and south walls of the chancel, mortared into cavities. Presume they are acoustic jars, the mouths covered with slates and plastered over at the time of reformation.


Amery, J. S., 1873, Notice of Supposed Acoustic Jars found in the Parish Church of St. Andrew, at Ashburton, 203-205 (Article in Serial). SDV296284.


Worthy, C., 1875, Ashburton and its Neighbourhood (Monograph). SDV347162.


Dymond, R., 1876, A Memoir of John Dunning, 1st Lord of Ashburton, 106 (Article in Serial). SDV294586.


Phillips, J., 1876, The Ashburton Urn, 391-5 (Article in Serial). SDV295511.

Wheel-thrown, of coarse local clay. Believed to date from during or subsequent to roman occupation.


Harpley, W., 1877, Report of the Council, 22-23 (Article in Serial). SDV296349.


Hills, G. M., 1882, Acoustic Jars, from the Churches of Ashburton and Luppitt, Devon, 218-221 fig (Article in Serial). SDV295509.

Jars lay on their sides, their mouths directed to the inside of the church. All were empty. Nine or ten in number, not placed regularly one above another. They are made of red ware, and have a zigzag line around the body with a very faint white mark under it. They were firmly fixed into mortar. The red ware is highly burned, almost to a grey hue. The jars are not alike in their ornaments.


Reichel, O. J., 1898, The Domesday Churches of Devon, 307 (Article in Serial). SDV863.

It is thought that the bishops and canons of the 11th century cathedral church in Exeter had a rural oratory at Ashburton.


Bligh Bond, F., 1903, Devonshire Screens and Rood Lofts. Part II, 439 (Article in Serial). SDV6113.

Rood screen. Erected 1525, demolished 1718, fragments preserved in the town. Pulpit now at Bigbury Church. Niche with statue of St. Peter, piece of furniture at vicarage. Modern screen erected subsequently.


S. G., 1906-1907, Acoustic Jars in Churches, 236 (Article in Serial). SDV295512.


Amery, P. F. S., 1906-1907, Oak Carving at Ashburton in Tudor Days, 219-228 (Article in Serial). SDV296279.

In 1314, Bishop Stapledon ordered the church to be repaired and the north aisle rebuilt. Mostly 15th century except north entrance (semi-norman), and window of small chapel behind the altar (early English).


Whitely, H. M., 1910, Visitations of Devonshire Churches, 452-453,465 (Article in Serial). SDV124357.

Episcopal visitations made in July 1301. Nave described as too dark. Bell tower was in the process of being re-roofed. A later visitation in april 1314, found upkeep unsatisfactory.


Thompson, A. H., 1913, Church Architecture in Devon (Article in Serial). SDV15387.


Thompson, A. H., 1913, Church Architecture in Devon, 458, 463, 470 (Article in Serial). SDV15387.


Unattributed, 1913-1980, Unknown source (Unattributed Sites and Monuments Register Entry). SDV296268.

St. Andrew's Parish Church, Ashburton. 15th century building with some features of earlier church incorporated. Date of early church uncertain. Referred to in document written in 1186-1191. In two early 14th century documents the church seems to have consisted of a dilapidated early chancel, a central tower, and a dark nave aisled on both sides. Probably cruciform.
A. Hamilton Thomas (Church Architecture in Devon, Arch. Journal LXX (1913)) found some evidence that the church originally possessed a central tower, demolished when remodelled in the 15th century. Fig.3 shows building periods.
Plan. Detailed description of church. Screen erected 16th century. Font, an elaborate mid-Victorian alabaster production. Medieval chest of 1483, two of its original keys still in use. Part of 16th century screen is incorporated in parclose screen erected in St. Catherine's Chapel in 1934. Each chapel has a reset piscina of 14th century date, of identical design. Their heads are two-centred, trefoiled, of nearly equilateral form, and their edges, including jamb and cill, are moulded with a hollow chamfer between two half rounds separated by fillets. Shallow bowls with one drain hole. The south transept is under the south window, and its head is a restoration. The Lady Chapel piscina of 13th century is reset in later work. St. John the Baptist piscina is of 14th century. Same design as others, a reincorporation into later work but with four drain holes.
During the first half of the 16th century we find a thorough restoration of the parish church was commenced while Thomas Prideaux was warden. Various parts of the church were reseated which took five years to complete until 1516. In 1516 the image of the blessed virgin was painted on the high alter. In 1521 a roof loft was erected, and in 1525 parclose screens were erected between the chancels and the chapels, and the aisles paved with 'tyling'. A Tudor pulpit and lectern of the time of Bishop Oldham (1504-1519) remained in the church until 1777, when they were sold to Bigbury. This was done when Sir Robert Palk returned from India and presented a most handsome three-decker pulpit, a marvel of joinery and teak which occupied the centre of the transept until a recent restoration swept that away also.


Amery, J. S., 1924, (Presidential Address) The Ashburton of past days: its manners, customs and inhabitants (Article in Serial). SDV315287.


Amery, J. S., 1924-1925, The Old Bells at Ashburton, 253 (Article in Serial). SDV294555.


Cresswell, B. F., 1927, Devonshire Churches: The Buildings and Builders, 158 (Article in Serial). SDV124362.


Rose-Troup, F., 1932 - 1933, Bishop Oldham and Ottery St Mary, 157 (Article in Serial). SDV336632.


Fryer Cornelius, C., 1946, Ancient Devon Parish Churches within a Ten Mile Radius of Newton Abbot, 123-152 (Article in Serial). SDV312246.


Fryer Cornelius, C., 1947, Fittings, Furnishings and Finishings of the Ancient Devon Parish Churches within a Ten Mile Radius of Newton Abbot, 81-98 (Article in Serial). SDV312247.


Copeland, G. W., 1951, 20th Report of the Plymouth and District Branch, 110 (Article in Serial). SDV244496.

Principal features include a fine west tower, north porch and oak roofs. Founded late 12th or early 13th century and rebuilt between 1405 and 1449. Contains an oak chest of 1483.


Fryer Cornelius, C., 1951, Mediaeval Effigies and other Sepulchral Memorials in the Parish Churches within a Ten-Mile Radius of Newton Abbot, 217-234 (Article in Serial). SDV339049.


Lamb, S., 1957, Some notes on 18th century furnishings in the parish churches of Devon, 218 (Article in Serial). SDV65364.

St. Andrew's. Parish church pulpit, dated 1777, has been removed.


Fryer Cornelius, C., 1959, St. Andrew's Church, Ashburton, 145-170 (Article in Serial). SDV296278.

St. Andrew's Church History and description of fabric
Much of the screenwork dates to the early 16th century, in the restoration of 1718, fragments were used to erect the western gallery. Details of other screens in church also given.
The 16th century lecturn was fashioned in the form of an owl, the rebus of Bishop Oldham, who is said to have been the donor. Together with the 16th century pulpit it was sold to Bigbury Church in 1776, where the head of an eagle was substituted for that of the owl. A large mahogany three-decker pulpit with sounding board was introduced in 1776.
The sedilia was removed in 1840.
Elaborate mid-Victorian alabaster font, placed on a foot pace under the tower.
The tower contains a fine ring of eight bells. These, with the exception of the treble and second which were added later, are dated 1740. They ring in the key of E major. The tenor weighs 1079 kilograms. Quoted in Ellacomb is an extract from an inventory of church goods in the public records office, London, dated 7 Edward VI (1553): 'Hundred of Teignbridge Ayssheberton V bells in tower there.'
The present clock was placed in the tower in 1887, a Queen Victoria Jubilee memorial. Possesses two dials, placed on the south and east faces of the tower, and strikes on the bells, at the quarters of the hour, the Westminster chimes. The church-wardens accounts refer to a clock here in 1479.
Stained glass for the great east window given by sub-dean Fisher of Exeter Cathedral in 1840. The stained glass in the great west window is by Kempe, replacing the original 15th century window. In the glass of the batement lights of the great northern window of the north transept are armorial bearings. These were formerly in the great east window of the sanctuary and are dated 1840.
Borough seal of the 14th century has a representation of a church on it. S. J. Amery (1924) suggests that this church was possibly the parish church of that date and not the chapel of St. Lawrence as usually assumed. The device shows a building with three gable ends and a central spire (evidently cruciform). He dates the seal to between 1220 and 1314. The building appears to be of the geometrical phase of medieval architecture.
A small arched recess in the wall east of the north door was probably a holy water stoup which originally must have possessed a stone basin.
In St. Catherine's and St. Thomas a Becket chapels are reset piscinas of 14th century date and identical design. Their heads are two- centered, trefoiled of nearly equilateral form and their edges, including jamb and cill are moulded, consisting of a hollow chamfer between two half rounds separated by fillets. The bowls are shallow and have one drain hole each. The St. Catherine piscina is placed under the south window, and its head is a restoration. In the lady chapel is a 13th century piscina and in 1840 another was discovered in the sanctuary which was walled-up again.
Reredos given to the church during 1840 by sub-dean Fisher of Exeter Cathedral.
An altar of bath stone, said to be designed by A. W. Pugin, was given to the church by sub-dean Fisher of Exeter Cathedral in 1840. In the sanctuary.
The 16th century bench ends referred to in the churchwardens accounts were removed in 1776 and replaced by "horse-box" pews. The ancient choir stalls were also removed.
In 1840 when the plaster was removed from the sanctuary wall, portions of recumbent effigy arrayed in a robe with traces of scarlet colour powdered with fleur-de-lis was found. A tomb effigy, possibly of the 13th century, from the earlier church built into the later walling.
Six walled graves were discovered beneath the altar of the sanctuary, containing six skeletons, believed to be of early vicars. Found in 1840 when the church was being restored. Some floor memorials were destroyed in 1776 when the church was repaved.
Mural memorial tablet, a small brass to Robert Caunter (1643), is on the east wall of St. Catherine's Chapel. Over the doorway of the south chancel chapel is a mural tablet to John Dunning, 1st. Lord Ashburton (died 1783). On south wall of the chapel is a mural tablet to Thomas Cruse (1642) and George Cruse (1646).
Near the font is a medieval chest made in 1483. Two of the original keys are still used for locking the chest.
Under the plaster of the side wall of the sanctuary were found several jars built into the masonry, said to contain human hearts. Probably acoustic jars. Said to be of late 14th or early 15th century.


Hanham, H. J., 1962, A Tangle Untangled: Lordship of the Manor and Borough of Ashburton, 451 (Article in Serial). SDV307607.

The present bells were presented to the church in the first half of the 18th century.


Leland, J., 1964, Leland's Itinerary 1535-45 (Monograph). SDV337630.

Church founded in about 1137 by Ethelward de Pomeroy (citing Leland).


Hanham, H. J., 1967, The Suppression of the Chantries in Ashburton, 113-114 (Article in Serial). SDV296289.

The 15th century rebuilding of the church referred to. It was carried out on a lavish scale.


THE PAROCHIAL CHURCH COUNCIL, 1970, St. Andrew's Church, Ashburton, 7, 9, 17 (Leaflet). SDV296291.

The ground plan of the church is cruciform consisting of nave, with north and south aisles and their transepts respectively; the chancel with smaller chapel on either side and the sanctuary or holy place.
Rood Screen erected in 1884, is mid-Victorian Gothic. It replaced a 16th century wood screen which was removed in 1718. The modern rood screen - the work of Herbert Read, was set up in 1937.
The present pulpit and lectern are modern, the work of Harry Hems of Exeter. The carved oak pulpit and eagle lectern now in Bigbury Church were probably taken there in 1776 by a Charles Powlett, a curate of Ashburton, on his presentation to the living there.
The tower was built by 15th century masons. It rises 92' to its embattled parapet and was re-roofed in copper in 1963 at a cost of 572 pounds sterling. Above the western entrance are three niches containing the figures of the virgin and child, with those of St. Catherine and St. Thomas on either side. The tower contains one of the finest peals of eight bells in the district.
It is said that the church bells were given to replace the original medieval bells which had been shipped to ireland for recasting, but were lost at sea. They were rehung in 1937.
The Elizabethan vessels - 160 ounces of silver were stolen from the church in 1817 - and the communion plate of solid but inartistic Georgian workmanship was used until 1964, when a chalice and paten in modern beaten silver of Chelmsford design were given to the church by the family of the late Mr and Mrs J. T. Waye and later the same year a matching ciborium was given by Mr E. W. Flemington.
The reredos in English oak, dedicated in January 1928, is the work of Herbert Read. It is in triptych form with a base on which are ranged twelve angels bearing emblems of the passion.


Department of Environment, 1973, Ashburton (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV300597.

Parish church. North porch and foundations to nave piers, late Norman or transitional. South aisle 1314. Church mainly dates from 1405 to 1449. Fine tower, 92ft high with stair turret in centre of north side. Church restored by G. E. Street 1883, walls stripped of plaster, new screen etc.


Bell, J. S., 2006, Archaeological recording at St. Andrew's House, West Street, Ashburton, Devon (Report - Evaluation). SDV358629.

Three trenches excavated to the south-west of the church did not reveal any archaeological features or deposits of pre-modern date.


Pearce, S. M., 2012, Early Medieval Ecclesiastical Sites in South-western Britain: their dates, characters and significance, 81 - 108 (Article in Serial). SDV361501.


Steinmetzer, M., 2016, Archaeological monitoring and recording at St Andrew’s Church, Ashburton, Devon (Report - Watching Brief). SDV359901.

The work to the floor of the church exposed wall foundations from the earliest stone church, built probably in the late 12th century, as well as seven later phases of alterations and additions. The early church plan is likely to have comprised a narrow nave, transepts and chancel. No evidence was found of a tower over the crossing and it is unclear where the early tower was located. To this was added a south and north aisle. The early church was demolished when the current church was built, probably between 1405 and 1446. The present tower was probably built first. The south porch was removed in 1776. Medieval floor levels and other stratified deposits were removed in 1883 by groundworks carried out during the reordering of the church. A small area of 18th century flooring survived in the north transept.
The works also exposed 6 burial chambers dating from the 18th and early 19th centuries and a number of stone-lined graves dating to the 16th and 18th centuries, including one in the south transept. Two foundation pads for the western gallery were identified at the western end of the nave, although no evidence survived below-ground for the galleries in the south and north aisles.
Fragments of medieval and early post-medieval earthenware floor tiles, dating to the 15th-17th century, were recovered from the charnel soil.


Ordnance Survey, 2016, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV359352.

Depicted on the modern mapping.


Historic England, 2016, National Heritage List for England, Accessed 22/11/2016 (National Heritage List for England). SDV359353.

ASHBURTON - SX7569 WEST STREET 849-1/10/210 (South side) 07/08/51 Church of St Andrew - GV I
Parish church. Early or mid C15 (tower before 1449); restored by G E Street 1882-3. Stone rubble with granite dressings; windows in limestone, possibly Bath stone. Slated roof.
Chancel, N and S chancel chapels, N and S transepts, nave, four bay N and S aisles, N porch, W tower. Vestry E of chancel; lobby and choristers' room to S. Perpendicular traceried windows, much restored in C19. Setback buttresses. Battlemented parapets. 5 sided stair turret at W end of each aisle. Doorway to porch has pointed, double-chamfered arch springing from rounded half-columns. West tower (the finest feature) about 21 m high, rises in 3 stages with setback buttresses diminishing in thickness at each stage. 5 sided stair turret on N face. Heavily moulded W door (restored) with 3 much restored niches above containing C19 figures. Battlemented parapets with pinnacles. Vestry has 2-light C19 E window surrounded by late C18 and early C19 memorials to the Winsor family.
Interior: chancel and nave have arcades of octagonal granite columns supporting double-chamfered pointed granite arches; columns have hollowed faces to the shafts, moulded limestone (Beer stone?) capitals. Trefoil-headed piscinas in chancel chapels and transepts. Wagon roofs over chancel, nave, and transepts. Cambered aisle and chancel-chapel roofs with intersecting beams and carved bosses; beams moulded on S side, carved on N side. One of the bosses is said to carry the letter L for Bishop Lacey (1420-56). Two fine C18 brass candelabras in nave. Oak reredos 1928 by Herbert Read. Chancel screen 1884. Pulpit by Harry Hems of Exeter, late C19 or early C20. Marble font, 1840. In N transept a painting of the crucifixion by Legassick, a Devon artist; part of former reredos. (The Buildings of England: Cherry B: Devon (2nd edition): London: 1989-: 131-2).
Listing NGR: SX7552769759.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV124357Article in Serial: Whitely, H. M.. 1910. Visitations of Devonshire Churches. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 42. 452-453,465.
SDV124362Article in Serial: Cresswell, B. F.. 1927. Devonshire Churches: The Buildings and Builders. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 33. Unknown. 158.
SDV15387Article in Serial: Thompson, A. H.. 1913. Church Architecture in Devon. Archaeological Journal. 70. Unknown.
SDV244496Article in Serial: Copeland, G. W.. 1951. 20th Report of the Plymouth and District Branch. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 83. Unknown. 110.
SDV294555Article in Serial: Amery, J. S.. 1924-1925. The Old Bells at Ashburton. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 13. Unknown. 253.
SDV294586Article in Serial: Dymond, R.. 1876. A Memoir of John Dunning, 1st Lord of Ashburton. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 8. Unknown. 106.
SDV295509Article in Serial: Hills, G. M.. 1882. Acoustic Jars, from the Churches of Ashburton and Luppitt, Devon. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 38. Unknown. 218-221 fig.
SDV295510Article in Serial: Amery, J. S.. 1873. Acoustic Jars in St. Andrews, Ashburton. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 6. Unknown. 203-5.
SDV295511Article in Serial: Phillips, J.. 1876. The Ashburton Urn. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 8. Unknown. 391-5.
SDV295512Article in Serial: S. G.. 1906-1907. Acoustic Jars in Churches. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 4. Digital. 236.
SDV296268Unattributed Sites and Monuments Register Entry: Unattributed. 1913-1980. Unknown source. Unknown.
SDV296278Article in Serial: Fryer Cornelius, C.. 1959. St. Andrew's Church, Ashburton. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 91. Unknown. 145-170.
SDV296279Article in Serial: Amery, P. F. S.. 1906-1907. Oak Carving at Ashburton in Tudor Days. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 4. Unknown. 219-228.
SDV296284Article in Serial: Amery, J. S.. 1873. Notice of Supposed Acoustic Jars found in the Parish Church of St. Andrew, at Ashburton. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 6. 203-205.
SDV296289Article in Serial: Hanham, H. J.. 1967. The Suppression of the Chantries in Ashburton. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 99. Unknown. 113-114.
SDV296291Leaflet: THE PAROCHIAL CHURCH COUNCIL. 1970. St. Andrew's Church, Ashburton. Unknown. Unknown. 7, 9, 17.
SDV296349Article in Serial: Harpley, W.. 1877. Report of the Council. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 9. Unknown. 22-23.
SDV300597List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1973. Ashburton. Historic Houses Register. A4 Spiral Bound.
SDV307607Article in Serial: Hanham, H. J.. 1962. A Tangle Untangled: Lordship of the Manor and Borough of Ashburton. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 94. Unknown. 451.
SDV312246Article in Serial: Fryer Cornelius, C.. 1946. Ancient Devon Parish Churches within a Ten Mile Radius of Newton Abbot. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 78. A5 Hardback. 123-152.
SDV312247Article in Serial: Fryer Cornelius, C.. 1947. Fittings, Furnishings and Finishings of the Ancient Devon Parish Churches within a Ten Mile Radius of Newton Abbot. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 79. A5 Hardback. 81-98.
SDV315287Article in Serial: Amery, J. S.. 1924. (Presidential Address) The Ashburton of past days: its manners, customs and inhabitants. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 56. Unknown.
SDV336632Article in Serial: Rose-Troup, F.. 1932 - 1933. Bishop Oldham and Ottery St Mary. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 17. Unknown. 157.
SDV337630Monograph: Leland, J.. 1964. Leland's Itinerary 1535-45. Leland's Itinerary 1535-45. 1. Unknown.
SDV339049Article in Serial: Fryer Cornelius, C.. 1951. Mediaeval Effigies and other Sepulchral Memorials in the Parish Churches within a Ten-Mile Radius of Newton Abbot. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 83. A5 Hardback. 217-234.
SDV347162Monograph: Worthy, C.. 1875. Ashburton and its Neighbourhood. Ashburton and its Neighbourhood. Digital.
SDV358629Report - Evaluation: Bell, J. S.. 2006. Archaeological recording at St. Andrew's House, West Street, Ashburton, Devon. Exeter Archaeology. 06.34. A4 Stapled.
SDV359352Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2016. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey Digital Mapping. Digital. [Mapped feature: #105579 ]
SDV359353National Heritage List for England: Historic England. 2016. National Heritage List for England. Historic Houses Register. Digital. Accessed 22/11/2016.
SDV359901Report - Watching Brief: Steinmetzer, M.. 2016. Archaeological monitoring and recording at St Andrew’s Church, Ashburton, Devon. Oakford Archaeology. 16-04. Digital.
SDV361501Article in Serial: Pearce, S. M.. 2012. Early Medieval Ecclesiastical Sites in South-western Britain: their dates, characters and significance. Antiquaries Journal. 92. Paperback Volume. 81 - 108.
SDV6113Article in Serial: Bligh Bond, F.. 1903. Devonshire Screens and Rood Lofts. Part II. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 35. Digital. 439.
SDV65364Article in Serial: Lamb, S.. 1957. Some notes on 18th century furnishings in the parish churches of Devon. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 89. A5 Hardback. 218.
SDV863Article in Serial: Reichel, O. J.. 1898. The Domesday Churches of Devon. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 30. A5 Paperback. 307.

Associated Monuments

MDV120461Related to: 1-3 Staverton Cottages, Ashburton (Building)
MDV92766Related to: Boundary wall and features north of St Andrew's Church, Ashburton (Monument)
MDV119841Related to: Church Cottage, Ashburton (Building)
MDV92554Related to: Headstone 150 metres south-east of Church of St Andrew, Ashburton (Monument)
MDV116761Related to: Old Vicarage, St Andrew's House, Ashburton (Building)

Associated Finds

  • FDV6026 - EFFIGY (XII to XIII - 1200 AD to 1299 AD)
  • FDV6029 - JAR (XIII to XV - 1300 AD to 1450 AD)
  • FDV2188 - SEAL (XIII to XIV - 1300 AD to 1399 AD)
  • FDV2187 - POT (XIV to XV - 1350 AD to 1450 AD)
  • FDV6358 - FLOOR TILE (XIV to XVII - 1400 AD to 1699 AD)
  • FDV6028 - CHEST (XV - 1483 AD to 1483 AD)
  • FDV2260 - CHURCH PLATE (XVI to XVII - 1558 AD to 1603 AD)
  • FDV6027 - PLAQUE (XVII to XVIII - 1643 AD to 1783 AD)
  • FDV3308 - BELL (XVIII to Unknown - 1740 AD)
  • FDV3309 - CLOCK (XIX - 1887 AD to 1887 AD)

Associated Events

  • EDV7131 - Watching brief at St Andrew's Church, Ashburton (Ref: 1260)

Date Last Edited:Jun 28 2018 12:27PM