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HER Number:MDV80493
Name:Hole Farmhouse

Summary

Early-mid 16th century farmhouse, with major later 16th and 17th century improvements.

Location

Grid Reference:ST 043 207
Map Sheet:ST02SW
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishHockworthy
DistrictMid Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishHOCKWORTHY

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old Listed Building Ref (II): 95918

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • FARMHOUSE (XVI - 1501 AD to 1600 AD (Between))

Full description

2004, Tree ring date lists 2004 (Article in Serial). SDV361593.

The following tree ring dates were recorded for HOCKWORTHY, Hole Farmhouse (ST 043 207): Felling date/ranges: Spring 1460; 1462-94; 1476-1508.


McConnell, R. + Powell, D., 2010, Hole Farm, Hockworthy, Tiverton, Devon, An Archaeological Programme of Works: Historic Building Recording, Desk Based Appraisal and Archaeological Monitoring and Recording During Development Groundworks, 3 (Report - non-specific). SDV347614.

The farmhouse is a long building built across the hillslope facing south-west, with a five-room and through passage plan. However the core is the three-room and through passage section to the left. The left end room is a kitchen with a gable-end stack and former walk-in curing chamber alongside and projecting forward. The house has a long structural development and much evidence for this is hidden or has been replaced. At the time of construction the hall, and maybe the passage and lower end parlour (then a service room), was open to the roof and heated by an open hearth fire. The hall was eventually floored in the mid-17th century, and associated with a major re-arrangement. The inner room was converted to a kitchen with a new stack and curing chamber, and the dairy to the rear was probably added at this time. Building works in the single storey extension to the rear involved the removal of all internal partitions, wall plaster, ceilings and floors to expose the roof timbers, stone walls and a stone culvert beneath the floors. No original features or historic fabric were visible inside, and the exterior comprised a random coursed stone wall under a clay pantile roof, with two wooden framed windows either side of a part-glazed door. Other details: Figures 2, 4; plates 1-3.


Ordnance Survey, 2011, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV346129.


English Heritage, 2011, National Heritage List for England (National Heritage List for England). SDV347072.

Farmhouse. Early-mid 16th century (the 19th century deeds mention a grant of land here circa 1540) with major later 16th and 17th century improvements, modernised in 19th century and again circa 1970. Exposed local stone rubble; stone rubble stacks and chimneyshafts topped with 20th century brick; interlocking tile roof, formerly thatch. Plan and development: long building built across the hillslope facing south-west with a five-room-and-through-passage plan. However the core of the plan is the three-room- and-through-passage plan section to left. The left end room is a kitchen with a gable-end stack and former walk-in curing chamber alongside and projecting forward. Next to it is the hall with large axial stack backing onto the passage. The 20th century stairs which rise against the rear wall of the hall do so over the remains of a former winder stair. Below (right of) the passage there is a parlour which has an axial stack shared with the first room of the two-room extension on the right end. The right room has a gable end stack. Probably 17th century dairy outshot to rear of the left end kitchen. From the passage rightwards the two-storey outshots are probably late 19th - early 20th century. This house has a long structural development, and much of the structural evidence for this is hidden or has been replaced. Nevertheless the original house, dating from the early or mid 16th century, appears to have been a three-room-and-through-passage plan house. At this time the hall, and maybe the passage and lower end parlour (then a service room), was open to the roof and heated by an open hearth fire. The inner room (the left end kitchen) was floored over with a chamber above. The hall fireplace was inserted in the late 16th century, probably at the same time that the passage and lower end were floored over. The hall was eventually floored in the mid 17th century associated with a major rearrangement. The inner room was converted to a kitchen with a new stack and curing chamber. Also the dairy to rear was probably added at the same time. The hall now became the dining room and the lower room became a parlour which was refurbished again in the late 17th - early 18th century. The two-room extension to right is probably mid or late 17th century. It is now divided off as a separate cottage and might have been built so originally. The house is 2 storeys throughout. Exterior: long and irregular 5-window front of 19th and 20th century replacement casements some with circa 1970 concrete lintels. The passage front doorway is a little left of centre and contains 19th century style panelled door and there is another at the right end to the cottage. Alongside the passage door the window to the lower parlour has been converted to a french window. At the left end the former curing chamber projects forward. The roof is gable-ended. Interior: the old inner room, the 17th century kitchen, has a soffit-chamfered and step- stopped crossbeam and the large stone rubble fireplace has a plain-chamfered oak lintel, a side oven and disused walk-in curing chamber alongside. The former hall is a large room with a large stone rubble fireplace and oak lintel with a chamfered low Tudor arch. The crossbeam here is soffit-chamfered with scroll stops. The passage and parlour were refurbished in the late 17th - early 18th century and no carpentry detail shows. The doorway from passage to parlour contains a fielded two-panel door of that date. The parlour fireplace is blocked. There are a couple more similar doors around the house. The original roof survives over the hall and inner room/kitcnen. It is carried on side-pegged jointed cruck trusses. The two over the hall are heavily smoke-blackened from the original open hearth fire but that over the inner room/kitchen is clean. The rest of the roof appears to be a late 19th - early 20th century replacement built to incorporate the two-storey outshots. The carpentry detail of the two-room extension is otherwise 17th century. Both rooms have plain soffit- chamfered axial beams.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV346129Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2011. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey. Map (Digital). [Mapped feature: #107287 ]
SDV347072National Heritage List for England: English Heritage. 2011. National Heritage List for England. Website.
SDV347614Report - non-specific: McConnell, R. + Powell, D.. 2010. Hole Farm, Hockworthy, Tiverton, Devon, An Archaeological Programme of Works: Historic Building Recording, Desk Based Appraisal and Archaeological Monitoring and Recording During Development Groundworks. Context One Archaeological Services Report. WBF/10/HHT. A4 Stapled + Digital. 3.
SDV361593Article in Serial: 2004. Tree ring date lists 2004. Vernacular Architecture. 35. Unknown.

Associated Monuments

MDV68879Part of: Hole Farm (Monument)
MDV80509Related to: Former Pond at Hole Farm (Monument)
MDV80502Related to: Stone Culvert, Hole Farm (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV5185 - Historic Building Recording at Hole Farm
  • EDV5186 - Archaeological Monitoring and Recording at Hole Farm

Date Last Edited:Jul 19 2018 4:33PM