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HER Number:MDV844
Name:8 Cross Street, Barnstaple

Summary

A house and shop originally built about 1635, remodelled in the early-mid 19th century.

Location

Grid Reference:SS 557 331
Map Sheet:SS53SE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishBarnstaple
DistrictNorth Devon
Ecclesiastical ParishBARNSTAPLE

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SS53SE/65
  • Old Listed Building Ref (II*): 485576

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • HOUSE (XVII - 1601 AD to 1700 AD (Between))

Full description

Ordnance Survey, 1880-1899, First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map (Cartographic). SDV336179.

Shown on 19th century map as a group of adjoining buildings on the north side of Cross Street.


Oliver, B. W., 1917, The early Seventeenth-Century Plaster Ceilings of Barnstaple, 192, plate 4 (Article in Serial). SDV342394.

8 Cross Street, single rib plaster ceiling; the mouldings being composed of simple rounds and hollows. On the ground floor. Curved ribs forming panels arranged around a central panel in which are the town arms on a Flemish escutcheon. Cast ornament. Three types of spray used. Enriched with isolated paterae, a conventional tudor rose and a daisy in a ring surrounded by foliage forming a square. Similar ceiling upstairs but panels are heart-shaped, radiating from a centre pendant. No paterae; two sprays.


Department of Environment, 1988, Barnstaple, 24 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV79511.

House and shop built about 1635, remodelled externally in early or mid 19th century. Rendered front, probably of brick or timber-framing; rear wall of stone rubble with segmental red-brick window arches, rear closet wing (former gallery) of red brick. Structure of side walls uncertain but front end of left side wall is clearly of brick in third storey. Slated roofs, except for corrugated asbestos at rear end of gallery and flat roof to back block; front block has two roofs at right angles to street, hipped front and back, the front hips linked to resemble a parallel roof. In centre of right hand roof, 4 original, diagonally set chimneys of red brick. Late 19th or early 20th century red brick chimney on left side wall. Wide fronted, double depth plan one room wide with gallery and back block; front block with double chimney between front and back rooms, dog-leg staircase to left of back room. Second floor plan has four original rooms, two at the front with entrance lobby. Ground storey partitions removed and courtyard glazed over to form deep shop through both blocks. Three storeys: back block reduced to one storey. Four window front. 20th century shop front in ground storey. Upper storey windows have sashes in recessed box-frames; in second storey sashes have horns and two upright glazing bars to each upper sash, in third storey six paned sashes without horns. Wooden eaves cornice. Interior has many original features. Ground storey has single rib ceiling and frieze in what was originally the rear room of the front block. At the rear of back block is a painted limestone chimneypiece removed from front block; Tudor arch with sunk spandrels, ogee and ovolo mouldings, urn stops. Similar chimneypiece in first floor front room, but without the paint. Rear first floor room has another single rib ceiling with a section of frieze in a cupboard on right hand side of chimneybreast. Chamfered door frames with scroll stops at entrances to gallery and staircase. Latter is of wood with closed strings, turned balusters and a high moulded handrail. Second floor has original door frames to all rooms, chamfered and with scroll stops as on the floor below. A small lobby giving access to the two front rooms has an ovolo moulded door frame with scroll stops. Three old plank doors with moulded ribs; studded plank door to gallery. Right hand front room has wooden chimneypiece. Gallery has wooden three light window with mullions. Roof timbers accessible only at the rear left hand side; trusses with threaded purlins and ridge, collars pegged high up on faces of principal rafters. The house was town property, leased to Richard Harris the Younger of Barnstaple, Yeoman in 1634, on condition that he rebuilt it within five years at a cost of £200. Building probably started in 1635, since Numvber 7, which was rebuilt in that year, took in part of Number 8's ground. The freehold was sold off in 1921.


Rance, C. + Weddell, P. J., 1994, An Archaeological Assessment of Proposed Marks and Spencer Development in Holland Street and Paiges Lane, Barnstaple, 6 (Report - Assessment). SDV82149.

18th century building with three storeys and four sash windows. Front part of interior has an early 17th century ceiling.


Exeter Archaeology, 2003, Barnstaple Castle Car Park Scheme: Phase 1: Archaeological Assessment, 22 (Report - Assessment). SDV319631.


Ordnance Survey, 2010, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV344030.


English Heritage, 2012, National Heritage List for England (National Heritage List for England). SDV348729.

8 Cross Street. House and shop. Circa 1635, remodelled externally early or mid 19th century. Rendered front, probably of brick or timber-framing; rear wall of stone rubble with segmental red brick window arches. Structure of side walls uncertain, but front end of left side wall is clear of brick in 3rd storey. Slated roofs; front block has 2 roofs at right angles to street, hipped front and back, the front hips linked to resemble a parallel roof. In centre of right-hand roof, 4 original, diagonally set chimneys of red brick. Late 19th or early 20th century red brick chimney on left side wall. Wide-fronted, double-depth plan 1 room wide with gallery and back block; front block with double chimney between front and back rooms, dogleg staircase to left of back room. 2nd-floor plan has 4 original rooms, 2 at the front with entrance lobby. Ground-storey partitions removed and courtyard glazed over to form deep shop through both blocks. 3 storeys; back block reduced to 1 storey. 4-window range. Late 20th century shop front in ground storey. Upper-storey windows have sashes in recessed box-frames; in 2nd storey sashes have horns and 2 upright glazing bars to each upper sash with margin panes, in 3rd storey 6-paned sashes without horns. Wooden eaves cornice. INTERIOR: many original features. Ground storey has single-rib ceiling and frieze in what was originally rear room of front block. At rear of back block a painted limestone chimneypiece removed from front block; Tudor arch with sunk spandrels, ogee and ovolo mouldings, urn stops. Similar chimneypiece in first-floor front room, but without the paint. Rear first-floor room has another single rib ceiling with a section of frieze in cupboard on right-hand (east side of chimney-breast). Chamfered door-frames with scroll-stops at entrances to gallery and staircase. Latter of wood with closed strings, turned balusters and a high moulded handrail. Second floor has original door-frames to all rooms, chamfered and with scroll-stops as on the floor below. A small lobby giving access to the 2 front doors with moulded ribs; studded plank door to gallery. Right-hand (east) front room has wooden bolection-moulded chimneypiece. Gallery has wooden, 3-light window with ovolo-moulded mullions. Roof timbers accessible only at rear left-hand side; trusses with threaded purlins and ridge, collars pegged (not halved) high up on faces of principal rafters. HISTORICAL NOTE: the house was town property, leased to Richard Harris the younger of Barnstaple, yeoman in 1634, on condition that he rebuilt it within 5 years at a cost of »200. Building probably started in 1635, since No.7 which was rebuilt in that year, took in part of No.8's ground. The freehold was sold off in 1921. Date listed: 19th January 1951.


Southwest Archaeology, 2013, Greater Barnstaple Area Project Database, BHBS Mapping Area 281 (Un-published). SDV351581.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV319631Report - Assessment: Exeter Archaeology. 2003. Barnstaple Castle Car Park Scheme: Phase 1: Archaeological Assessment. Exeter Archaeology Report. 03.62. A4 Stapled + Digital. 22.
SDV336179Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1880-1899. First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map. First Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Map (Digital).
SDV342394Article in Serial: Oliver, B. W.. 1917. The early Seventeenth-Century Plaster Ceilings of Barnstaple. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 49. A5 Hardback. 192, plate 4.
SDV344030Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2010. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey. Map (Digital). [Mapped feature: #108472 ]
SDV348729National Heritage List for England: English Heritage. 2012. National Heritage List for England. Website.
SDV351581Un-published: Southwest Archaeology. 2013. Greater Barnstaple Area Project Database. Greater Barnstaple Area Project. Digital. BHBS Mapping Area 281.
SDV79511List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1988. Barnstaple. Historic Houses Register. Website. 24.
SDV82149Report - Assessment: Rance, C. + Weddell, P. J.. 1994. An Archaeological Assessment of Proposed Marks and Spencer Development in Holland Street and Paiges Lane, Barnstaple. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 94.04. A4 Stapled + Digital. 6.

Associated Monuments

MDV848Related to: 7 Cross Street, Barnstaple (Building)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV1378 - Barnstaple Castle Car Park Scheme Archaeological Assessment

Date Last Edited:Oct 3 2013 12:16PM