HeritageGateway - Home

Login  |  Register
Site Map
Text size: A A A
You are here: Home > > > > Devon & Dartmoor HER Result
Devon & Dartmoor HERPrintable version | About Devon & Dartmoor HER | Visit Devon & Dartmoor HER online...

See important guidance on the use of this record.

If you have any comments or new information about this record, please email us.


HER Number:MDV9063
Name:Totnes Castle

Summary

Totnes Castle with a motte and bailey was built in the 11th century with a shell keep rebuilt in the 14th century.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 799 605
Map Sheet:SX76SE
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishTotnes
DistrictSouth Hams
Ecclesiastical ParishTOTNES

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Devon Record Office: 564M/14/7, 11
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX86SW/20
  • Old Listed Building Ref (I): 99088
  • Old SAM County Ref: 4
  • Old SAM Ref: 22356
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division: SX76SE19
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division: SX86SW38
  • Royal Albert Memorial Museum Accession Number: 609/2007

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • CASTLE (XI to Early Medieval - 1001 AD to 1399 AD (Between))

Full description

Swete, J., 564M/14/7, 11 (Record Office Collection). SDV342893.


Cambridge University, AOQ 57-62 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342902.


Cambridge University, BIM 59-63 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342905.


Cambridge University, RC8-H 7-9 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342904.


National Monuments Record, SX7960 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342900.


Lysons, D. + Lysons, S., 1822, Magna Britannica, 533 (Monograph). SDV323771.


Windeatt, E., 1880, An Historical Sketch of Totnes, 189-96 (Article in Serial). SDV168929.


Wall, J. C., 1906, Ancient Earthworks, 621 (Article in Monograph). SDV341465.

Plan 622.


Armitage, E., 1912, The Early Norman Castles of the British Isles, 221 (Monograph). SDV74015.


Watkin, H. R., 1914, Untitled Source, 3-5 (Monograph). SDV169695.


Whitley, H. M., 1916, Totnes Castle and Walled Town, 189-96 (Article in Serial). SDV342886.

Totnes Castle motte and bailey with a stone shell keep on the motte. Norman origins, but surviving stone structures probably 14th century. The castle consists of a large motte with a roughly circular limestone rubble shell keep on top. The motte is surrounded by a ditch, which on the town side, has been built over. The bailey lies to the northeast, being enclosed by a deep, steep sided moat and a second ditch for part of its circuit. Nothing survives within the bailey above ground, except for portions of the stone curtain wall. There are faint indications of another bank and ditch enclosing a 2nd or outer bailey, possibly a stock enclosure. The moat was originally supplied with water via an aqueduct from Harperswell flowing past the Brodestone and through the West Gate.


Office of Works, 1922, Totnes Castle (Schedule Document). SDV342889.

Totnes Castle. Outer walls of the keep still standing, and a portion of the moat still intact. A show place with tennis court in precincts, overgrown with trees and brushwood. The tower on the motte with its embattled wall is still perfect in outward structure. Details of domestic buildings gone. The moat is said to be Neolithic, but this is doubtful. Monument 4.


Anon, 1927, Proceedings of Congress of British Archaeological Association in Exeter, 37-42 (Article in Serial). SDV345509.


Anon, 1930, Untitled Source, 553 (Article in Serial). SDV342895.


Cambridge University, 1950, FL 42-44, 44 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342901.


Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, 1951 - 1957, SX76SE19 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV342891.

Totnes Castle keep and bailey walls are ragstone built with limestone blocks and slabs of local shaley stone. The curtain and bailey walls have been robbed of about half their width, and much of the bailey wall seems to have been rebuilt after the castle had lost its military value. The bank enclosing the outer bailey may in fact be part of the defences of the Saxon town.


Rigold, S. E., 1954, Totnes Castle, 228-56, Figures 1-9, Plates 25-7 (Article in Serial). SDV342887.

The Ministry of Works assumed guardianship of Totnes Castle in 1947 when they repaired the exposed walls and excavated the area within the Keep. The Castle was first mentioned in 1205 but there may have been a reference to it in 1087 and it was out of use in 1343. The castle is a large motte and bailey. The motte is built of coarse rubble with the lowest part cut out of the rock. There is an outer bank round part of the bailey ditch and traces of an outer bailey to the north. The ditch round the motte is largely infilled. On the motte is a roughly circular shell-keep of limestone rubble with red sandstone dressings, linked to the curtain wall by two wing walls. The motte was probably built in the 11th century and a house was constructed at the beginning of the 13th century. After 1219 rebuilding was undertaken in the bailey and a weak shell-keep was built on the motte. The keep was rebuilt in the 14th century with a lean-to in the northwest.. Pottery recovered from the 1953 excavation produced pottery mainly of two periods. A hearth of the cob building produced sherds from the 12th to the early 13th century and a wall pocket in the southwest sector of the motte produced sherds from the mid 13th century.


Fox, A. + Dunning, C. G., 1957, A Medieval pottery kiln in Exeter, 52 (Article in Serial). SDV342912.

Pottery from the Bedford Garage site in Exeter compared with 12th/13th century examples from Totnes Castle.


Rigold, S. E., 1957, Untitled Source, 177-8 (Article in Serial). SDV342898.


Jope, E. M. + Threlfall, R. I., 1959, 12th Century Castle at Ascot Doilly, 237 (Article in Serial). SDV342907.


Cambridge University, 1962, CUCAP AFG, 80-84 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342911.

83 in HER.


Russell, P., 1964, Untitled Source, 17-18 (Monograph). SDV342906.


Woodford, I., 1965, Town the Nation May Adopt (Article in Serial). SDV56354.

Council of Archaeology identified Totnes is one of 51 towns which should be safeguarded as part of national heritage. Proposal meant that any planning would have to be considered by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government rather than just District councils.
The castle earthworks date from 1080, the circular keep crowning the mound from about 1300. When the clay ceiling was excavated, a fragment of Roman tile was discovered and that set diggers wondering whether there could have been a local Roman site. The oldest parts of the town are the castle mound and the Saxon walls.


Renn, D. F., 1968, Norman Castles in Britain, 326 (Monograph). SDV74059.


Rigold, S. E., 1975, Totnes Castle (Pamphlet). SDV342899.

Description and plan of Totnes Castle. The castle and Borough of Totnes were held by a number of families during the medieval period - these included Judhael of Totnes, the de Nonants, de Braoses, de Cantilupes and the de la Zouches, who owned the castle from the late 13th century until 1485. After this it passed into the hands of the Edgecombes, who sold Totnes Castle in the 16th century to the Seymour family.


Higham, R. A., 1979, The Castles of Medieval Devon, 92-102,271-273,275,293-5, 298,315,317-8,319,329, Figures 22-3, Plate 24 (Post-Graduate Thesis). SDV336189.


Timms, S. C., 1979, Untitled Source (Personal Comment). SDV342892.

Deep trenching carried out as part of Totnes Sewerage Scheme. Trench crosses corner of field to the northwest of the bailey. Watching brief carried out with negative results. Photographs in Parish File.


Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, 1980, SX86SW38 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV342903.


Thompson, M. W., 1986, Unknown, 305-21 (Article in Serial). SDV233104.

The construction of Totnes Castle may be linked with the foundation of Totnes Priory. Table 2.


Griffith, F. M., 1988, DAP/JO, 7-9 (Aerial Photograph). SDV177387.


Higham, R. A., 1988, Devon Castles: An Annotated List, 143 (Article in Serial). SDV341278.


Griffith, F. M., 1988, Devon's Past. An Aerial View, 89 (Monograph). SDV64198.

The bailey is in an unusual position as it appears to straddle the line of the town defences, which are presumably Saxon in origin. It is possible that the motte pre-dates the bailey.


Cherry, B. + Pevsner, N., 1989, The Buildings of England: Devon, 869-70 (Monograph). SDV325629.

Totnes Castle is a large mott and bailey with the possible fragment of a second bailey to the north established after the Norman Conquest at the highest point of the town and visibly intruding into the Anglo-Saxon street plan. Most of the visible remains are on the summit of the motte. The bailey is surrounded by a late Medieval wall with extensive modern additions. There are references to a hall, chamber and chapel occupying the bailey. The motte was excavated circa 1950 and the fabric of the two building periods was exposed. The shell keep dates from the early 14th century. The site was described as ruinous in 1273 but was defended again in 1326.


Griffith, F. M., 1990, DAP/SR, 14-15 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342909.


Griffith, F. M., 1990, DAP/TW, 1-5 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342910.


Horner, B., 1996, DAP/AAX, 29 (Aerial Photograph). SDV320375.


Higham, R. A. + Freeman, J. P., 1996, Devon Castles (Draft Text), 2-3,4, 6, 8, 11-14, gazetteer (Monograph). SDV354350.

Totnes Castle comprises a massive motte and bailey with a largely intact stone-built shell keep and the remains of curtain walls. One of several urban castles established as part of the Norman settlement of Devon, the location of which was to have a long-term effect on the street plan. It was built by Juhel, a Breton, who had been rewarded by William the Conqueror with extensive properties in South Devon. The exact date of its foundation is unknown but it was certainly in existence by the early 12th century when it is first documented. The motte, one of the largest in England, is sculpted from natural bedrock raised by the addition of pounded rubble and earth bonded with clay. Excavation has revealed that the earliest building on the motte was a rectangular tower, probably of timber on stone foundations. This was replaced by a shell keep in the 13th century. However, the well-preserved red sandstone structure on the site today is largely the work result of a substantial rebuilding programme in the early 14th century.


Department of Environment, 1996, Totnes Castle (Schedule Document). SDV342890.

This shell keep, motte and two baileys together form Totnes Castle which is situated on high ground commanding the head of the navigable reaches of the River Dart and overlooks Totnes town. The castle intrudes into the earlier Anglo Saxon street plan and it therefore almost certainly overlies part of the earlier town (burh). The nature, extent and character of the surviving Anglo Saxon features is unknown. The motte at totnes was built on the orders of Judhael of Brittany who held Totnes together with over a hundred Devonshire Manors immediately after the Norman Conquest. However in 1088 the estate passed to Roger de Nonant and remained with his family for three generations. In 1196 the castle passed to the de Braose family and it is considered likely that Reginald de Braose was responsible for the construction of the earliest shell keep and the rebuilding of the great hall. From 1230 the de Cantilupe family controlled the castle before being succeeded in 1273 by the de la Zouche's who had considerable power and influence. It is considered likely that William de la Zouche was responsible for much in the 14th century at the castle. Ironically having completed the refortification of the castle, it does not appear to have been lived in by the family and instead was occupied by a sequence of stewards or constables. During this time the condition of the castle appears to have deteriorated, as witnessed by a court case in 1466 which indicates that trees were growing on the motte. The castle finally passed from the de la Zouches in 1485 following the defeat of the Yorkists at Bosworth Field. For a short time during the 16th century the castle belonged to Richard Edgecombe of Cothele and during this time the town was visited by Leland, noted that the keep was well maintained, but that the buildings were completely ruinous. Around 1559 the castle was purchased by Sir Edward Seymour of Berry Pomeroy. The castle was not fortified during the Civil War and as a result was not demolished or damaged by the victorious Parliamentarians. In 1947 the castle was placed in the guardianship of the Ministry of Works.


Brown, S., 1998, Totnes Castle: An Archaeological Desk-based Assessment, 2, Figure 6 (Report - Assessment). SDV346119.

An archaeological desk-based assessment was undertaken of the site of proposed new visitor facilites. These lie in an area of potentially high archaeological significance, on the junction of the inner and outer castle ditches, and possibly including the site of a gate from the castle.


Brown, S., 1999, Totnes Castle Terrace Walls: An Archaeological Assessment, 2, Figure 1 (Report - Assessment). SDV346121.

The garden terracing on the town side of Totnes Castle motte appears from documentary sources to date from the late 16th or early 17th century, soon after the castle ditch on this side of the motte was infilled. Changes to the pattern of terraces are recorded in the early 18th century. Archaeological observations made on the area of the 1999 landslip generally confirm this date of origin and 18th century development. The presently surviving terrace walls show signs of repeated patching and rebuilding, the most extensive and recent repairs dating from the 1970s, when the Ministry of Works demolished standing structures and repaired or consolidated many of the walls.


English Heritage, 2000, Conditions for Appointment for Archaeological Services in Connection With Motte Slippage Stabilisation, Totnes Castle, Devon 1990/00 (Un-published). SDV352029.


English Heritage, 2000, Specification: Construction of New Facing Stonework and Repair of Existing Stonework in Motte Slip Repairs: Totnes Castle, Devon (Un-published). SDV352028.


English Heritage, 2000, Totnes Castle, Totnes, Devon: Structural Repairs to Motte Terraces West Face (Un-published). SDV352027.


Shannon, F. E., 2000, Totnes Castle: Design of Improvement Works (Report - non-specific). SDV352036.


Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2002, Totnes Castle (Correspondence). SDV342894.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for works concerning the erection of scaffolding to facilitate the insertion of 4 windows and tile/slate cladding to the rear wall of Little Tokeby and the formation of a land drain immediately adjacent to the rear wall within the castle grounds.


Brown, S., 2002, Totnes Castle: An Archaeological Evaluation, 2, 5, Figures 1-2, Plate 2 (Report - Evaluation). SDV346116.

A wall footing of medieval or early post-medieval date was exposed during archaeological trench evaluation, within the castle bailey near the entrance. It is 0.6 metres wide and clay bonded, so is unlikely to have supported a structural wall associated with a large building such as a gatehouse. It is more likely to have supported a wall of a single storey building, or possibly the internal wall of a building for which there is no other evidence at present.


Green, T., 2008, North Gate Lodge, Castle Street, Totnes: Results of an Archaeological Desk-Based Study, 5 (Report - Assessment). SDV342884.

Norman motte and bailey apparently superimposed on the north-western part of the town breaching the original defences.


Brown, S., 2008, Totnes Castle Archaeological Watching Brief, 2, Figures 1-6, Plates 1-5 (Report - Watching Brief). SDV346117.

An archaeological watching brief was undertaken during groundworks associated with the construction of a new site admissions building at Totnes Castle. The works located three wall footings probably associated with a medieval gatehouse, and a large stone foundation which may once have formed an abutment for a bridge leading into the medieval castle.


Higham, R. A., 2009, Devon Castle Studies. A Personal Reflection. Devon Archaeological Society Presidential Lecture 2009, 10,12, Figure 3 (Article in Serial). SDV344775.

A large motte and bailey castle best-known for its 14th century shell-keep and whose wall-walk and battlements survive in complete form.


English Heritage, 2009, List of Buildings of Architectural or Historic Interest (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV343181.

Totnes Castle first Listed on 14th November 1969. A motte and bailey castle, presumably with timber fortifications, was constructed by Judhael of Totnes shortly after the Conquest. It occupied the north-east corner of the Anglo-Saxon burgh. The earliest shell-keep, built by Reginald de Braose circa 1219, was extensively rebuilt together with the rest of the castle by Baron Zouche in 1326. The castle was later owned by the Edgecombes of Cothele and the Seymour family, by whom it was placed in the guardianship of the Ministry of Works in 1947. The main function of Totnes Castle was to act as a centre for the manorial courts under the constable, and as a base for the administration of the family estates. The earliest remains, apart from the motte and bailey earthworks, are masonry footings on the top of the motte of a 11th or 12th century square, timber tower. The surviving upstanding masonry is mostly of 14th century date and comprises a circular masonry shell-keep and sections of the bailey curtain wall. Keep of Devonion limestone rubble with red sandstone dressings and battered external face. Crenellated battlements with merlons pierced for loom; approached by 2 stairways in the thickness of the wall. Garderobe chamber also within the thickness of the curtain and projecting beyond the line of the wall; lit by pair of crossed loops. Bailey curtain-wall of pitched limestone rubble. The hall and other domestic buildings which formerly stood in the bailey no longer survive. Flanking the entrance to the site are two granite pillars possibly taken from the Exchange built in 1616 and pulled down in 1878.


Brown, S., 2011, Totnes Castle: Summary of Recent Archaeological Work 1999-2008 (Un-published). SDV352030.


Historic England, 2016, Totnes Castle, Application for Scheduled Monument Consent (Schedule Document). SDV359970.

Notification of granting of Scheduled Monument Consent, subject to conditions, in respect of proposed works at Totnes Castle concerning the rebuilding of a retaining wall with larger foundations, using blockwork faced with original masonry.


Orellana, J., 2016, Totnes Castle, Devon: Programme of Archaeological Work (Report - Excavation). SDV361620.

In November 2016, Cotswold Archaeology carried out a programme of archaeological work in advance of the rebuilding of a collapsed section of boundary wall at Totnes Castle, Devon.

Substantial cut 108 was not fully exposed in the trench and was undated artefactually, but is presumably part of the moat protecting the inner bailey, which is now dry but which survives as substantial ditched earthworks in the area of the trench. It is possible that layer 104 within cut 108 represents slumped/slighted material from a former outer bank.

Stone wall 102 was the foundation of the extant western boundary wall, which recently collapsed in the area of the trench. This wall foundation was undated artefactually, but is believed to be post-medieval in date. The wall was built in limestone rubble, randomly coursed and bonded with white sandy mortar. Its northern (external) face was well finished; its southern (internal) face was unfinished. A single fragment of clay tobacco pipe was recovered from a stony consolodation layer which butted the southern wall.


Historic England, 2017, Totnes Castle, Castle St, Totnes, TQ9 5NU (Schedule Document). SDV360672.

Notification of granting of Scheduled Monument Consent, subject to conditions, for the erection of railings, infill and repair of walls and, installation of gates.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV168929Article in Serial: Windeatt, E.. 1880. An Historical Sketch of Totnes. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 12. Hardback Volume. 189-96.
SDV169695Monograph: Watkin, H. R.. 1914. History of Totnes Priory and Medieval Town. Unknown. 3-5.
SDV177387Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1988. DAP/JO. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 7-9.
SDV233104Article in Serial: Thompson, M. W.. 1986. Unknown. Archaeological Journal. 143. Unknown. 305-21.
SDV320375Aerial Photograph: Horner, B.. 1996. DAP/AAX. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 29.
SDV323771Monograph: Lysons, D. + Lysons, S.. 1822. Magna Britannica. Magna Britannica: A Concise Topographical Account of The Several Counties o. 6: Devonshire. Unknown. 533.
SDV325629Monograph: Cherry, B. + Pevsner, N.. 1989. The Buildings of England: Devon. The Buildings of England: Devon. Hardback Volume. 869-70.
SDV336189Post-Graduate Thesis: Higham, R. A.. 1979. The Castles of Medieval Devon. University of Exeter Thesis. Unknown. 92-102,271-273,275,293-5, 298,315,317-8,319,329, Figures 22-3, Plate 24.
SDV341278Article in Serial: Higham, R. A.. 1988. Devon Castles: An Annotated List. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 46. Paperback Volume. 143.
SDV341465Article in Monograph: Wall, J. C.. 1906. Ancient Earthworks. Victoria History of the County of Devon. Hardback Volume. 621.
SDV342884Report - Assessment: Green, T.. 2008. North Gate Lodge, Castle Street, Totnes: Results of an Archaeological Desk-Based Study. Southwest Archaeology Report. 060915. A4 Stapled + Digital. 5.
SDV342886Article in Serial: Whitley, H. M.. 1916. Totnes Castle and Walled Town. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 48. A5 Hardback. 189-96.
SDV342887Article in Serial: Rigold, S. E.. 1954. Totnes Castle. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 86. A5 Hardback. 228-56, Figures 1-9, Plates 25-7.
SDV342889Schedule Document: Office of Works. 1922. Totnes Castle. The Schedule of Monuments. Foolscap.
SDV342890Schedule Document: Department of Environment. 1996. Totnes Castle. The Schedule of Monuments. A4 Stapled.
SDV342891Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. 1951 - 1957. SX76SE19. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
SDV342892Personal Comment: Timms, S. C.. 1979.
SDV342893Record Office Collection: Swete, J.. 564M/14/7, 11. Devon Record Office Collection. Print.
SDV342894Correspondence: Department for Culture, Media and Sport. 2002. Totnes Castle. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV342895Article in Serial: Anon. 1930. Archaeological Journal. 70. Unknown. 553.
SDV342898Article in Serial: Rigold, S. E.. 1957. Archaeological Journal. 114. Unknown. 177-8.
SDV342899Pamphlet: Rigold, S. E.. 1975. Totnes Castle. Department of Environment Guide. Paperback Volume.
SDV342900Aerial Photograph: National Monuments Record. SX7960. National Monuments Record Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper).
SDV342901Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University. 1950. FL 42-44. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. Photograph (Paper). 44.
SDV342902Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University. AOQ 57-62. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. Photograph (Paper).
SDV342903Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. 1980. SX86SW38. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
SDV342904Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University. RC8-H 7-9. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. Photograph (Paper).
SDV342905Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University. BIM 59-63. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. Photograph (Paper).
SDV342906Monograph: Russell, P.. 1964. The Good Town of Totnes. Unknown. 17-18.
SDV342907Article in Serial: Jope, E. M. + Threlfall, R. I.. 1959. 12th Century Castle at Ascot Doilly. Antiquaries Journal. 39. Unknown. 237.
SDV342909Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1990. DAP/SR. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 14-15.
SDV342910Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1990. DAP/TW. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 1-5.
SDV342911Aerial Photograph: Cambridge University. 1962. CUCAP AFG. Cambridge University Collection of Aerial Photographs. Photograph (Paper). 80-84.
SDV342912Article in Serial: Fox, A. + Dunning, C. G.. 1957. A Medieval pottery kiln in Exeter. Antiquaries Journal. 37. Unknown. 52.
SDV343181List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: English Heritage. 2009. List of Buildings of Architectural or Historic Interest. Historic Houses Register. Unknown.
SDV344775Article in Serial: Higham, R. A.. 2009. Devon Castle Studies. A Personal Reflection. Devon Archaeological Society Presidential Lecture 2009. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 67. Paperback Volume. 10,12, Figure 3.
SDV345509Article in Serial: Anon. 1927. Proceedings of Congress of British Archaeological Association in Exeter. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 33. Unknown. 37-42.
SDV346116Report - Evaluation: Brown, S.. 2002. Totnes Castle: An Archaeological Evaluation. Stewart Brown Associates Report. A4 stapled + Digital. 2, 5, Figures 1-2, Plate 2.
SDV346117Report - Watching Brief: Brown, S.. 2008. Totnes Castle Archaeological Watching Brief. Stewart Brown Associates Report. A4 Stapled + Digital. 2, Figures 1-6, Plates 1-5.
SDV346119Report - Assessment: Brown, S.. 1998. Totnes Castle: An Archaeological Desk-based Assessment. Stewart Brown Associates Report. A4 Stapled + Digital. 2, Figure 6.
SDV346121Report - Assessment: Brown, S.. 1999. Totnes Castle Terrace Walls: An Archaeological Assessment. Stewart Brown Associates Report. A4 Stapled + Digital. 2, Figure 1.
SDV352027Un-published: English Heritage. 2000. Totnes Castle, Totnes, Devon: Structural Repairs to Motte Terraces West Face. Notification Under DoE Circular 18/84. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV352028Un-published: English Heritage. 2000. Specification: Construction of New Facing Stonework and Repair of Existing Stonework in Motte Slip Repairs: Totnes Castle, Devon. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV352029Un-published: English Heritage. 2000. Conditions for Appointment for Archaeological Services in Connection With Motte Slippage Stabilisation, Totnes Castle, Devon 1990/00. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV352030Un-published: Brown, S.. 2011. Totnes Castle: Summary of Recent Archaeological Work 1999-2008. A4 Single Sheet + Digital.
SDV352036Report - non-specific: Shannon, F. E.. 2000. Totnes Castle: Design of Improvement Works. Babtie Group. BGE019874. A4 Unbound + Digital.
SDV354350Monograph: Higham, R. A. + Freeman, J. P.. 1996. Devon Castles (Draft Text). Devon Castles. A4 Unbound + Digital. 2-3,4, 6, 8, 11-14, gazetteer.
SDV359970Schedule Document: Historic England. 2016. Totnes Castle, Application for Scheduled Monument Consent. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Digital.
SDV360672Schedule Document: Historic England. 2017. Totnes Castle, Castle St, Totnes, TQ9 5NU. Application for Scheduled Monument Consent. Digital.
SDV361620Report - Excavation: Orellana, J.. 2016. Totnes Castle, Devon: Programme of Archaeological Work. Cotswold Archaeology. 16680. Digital.
Linked documents:1
SDV56354Article in Serial: Woodford, I.. 1965. Town the Nation May Adopt. The Western Morning News. Cutting + Digital.
SDV64198Monograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1988. Devon's Past. An Aerial View. Devon's Past. An Aerial View. Paperback Volume. 89.
SDV74015Monograph: Armitage, E.. 1912. The Early Norman Castles of the British Isles. The Early Norman Castles of the British Isles. Unknown. 221.
SDV74059Monograph: Renn, D. F.. 1968. Norman Castles in Britain. Norman Castles in Britain. Unknown. 326.

Associated Monuments

MDV18248Parent of: Castle Bailey, Totnes (Building)
MDV18247Parent of: Castle Motte and Keep, Totnes (Building)
MDV62838Parent of: Garden Terraces, Castle Motte, Totnes (Monument)
MDV55110Parent of: Graffiti on a Tree at Totnes Castle (Monument)
MDV79071Parent of: Possible Bridge, Totnes Castle (Monument)
MDV79070Parent of: Possible Gatehouse, Totnes Castle (Monument)
MDV62840Parent of: Trench, Totnes Castle, Totnes (Monument)
MDV63142Related to: House Back Block, Totnes Castle Motte (Monument)
MDV15812Related to: Little Totnes, Totnes (Monument)
MDV21815Related to: Medieval Borough of Totnes (Monument)
MDV9095Related to: North Gate, High Street, Totnes (Building)
MDV75678Related to: Northgate Lodge, Castle Street, Totnes (Building)
MDV41823Related to: Pottery, Bridgetown, Totnes (Monument)
MDV15239Related to: Saxon Burh, Totnes (Monument)
MDV63143Related to: Saxo-Norman Buried Soil, Totnes Castle,Totnes (Monument)
MDV9060Related to: Totnes Priory, north of Totnes Parish Church, Totnes (Monument)

Associated Finds

  • FDV1423 - TILE (Roman - 43 AD to 409 AD)
  • FDV1426 - ORNAMENT (IX to XIII - 900 AD to 1250 AD)
  • FDV1432 - BLADE (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1425 - ORNAMENT (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1430 - RING (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1429 - SCABBARD (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1424 - SPINDLE WHORL (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1431 - STRAP (Medieval - 1066 AD to 1539 AD)
  • FDV1428 - GAMING PIECE (XI to XII - 1100 AD to 1200 AD)
  • FDV1418 - POT (XI to XIII - 1100 AD to 1299 AD)
  • FDV1421 - ROOF SLATE (XI to XIII - 1100 AD to 1250 AD)
  • FDV1427 - SEAL (XI to XII - 1100 AD to 1200 AD)
  • FDV1419 - POT (XII to XIII - 1200 AD to 1300 AD)
  • FDV1422 - RIDGE TILE (XII to XIII - 1200 AD to 1300 AD)
  • FDV1420 - POT (XVI to XVII - 1600 AD to 1699 AD)

Associated Events

  • EDV4545 - Assessment of Northgate Lodge, Castle Street, Totnes
  • EDV4961 - Archaeological Evaluation at Totnes Castle
  • EDV4962 - Archaeological Watching Brief at Totnes Castle
  • EDV7609 - Programme of Archaeological Work: Totnes Castle, Totnes, Devon (Ref: 16680)

Date Last Edited:May 30 2019 12:32PM