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HER Number:MDV9069
Name:The Church of St Mary, High Street, Totnes

Summary

A parish church dating from the 15th century and later. Restoration work was undertaken by Gilbert Scott between 1867 and 1897.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 802 604
Map Sheet:SX86SW
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishTotnes
DistrictSouth Hams
Ecclesiastical ParishTOTNES

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • Church of England HER: 5173
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX86SW/25
  • Old Listed Building Ref (A)

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • PARISH CHURCH (XV to XIX - 1401 AD to 1897 AD (Between))

Full description

Pengelly, W., 1875, Devonshire Gleanings from 'Manningham's Diary'., 378 (Article in Serial). SDV350448.

Parish church. In the north aisle is a large marble gravestone, inlaid with brass on which were the effigies of Zachary Bogan. One effigy is torn off, underneath is a label of brass inscribed: 'here lyeth the body of Walter Bougins, of Totnes, merchant, who had to wife, Prothasy the eldest daughter of John Bodley of London, merchant, by whom he had issue six sons, and five daughters; and departed this life in the fifteenth day of April, A. D.1591'.

Pengelly, W., 1876, Devonshire Gleanings from 'Notes and Queries', 769-770 (Article in Serial). SDV56474.

Parish church. The north angle of the church is cut off in the lower part of the building to allow an arched passage from one side of the church to the other outside. Upper part of building supported by strong buttress, leaving the diagonal passage between it and the internal wall. The arched passage may have been formed between the church and the priory to allow room for the extension of the chancel on the erection of the church in 1432. Present churchyard is on the site of the priory.

Windeatt, E., 1880, An Historical Sketch of Totnes, 166 (Article in Serial). SDV168929.

Amery, J. S., 1880, The Accounts of the Receiver of the Corporation of Totnes, in the Year 1554-5, 327 (Article in Serial). SDV349327.

Parish church. In the south aisle of the chancel called Martyn's aisle, there is a handsome canopied tomb of Watey Smyth who died in 1555. Effigy missing.

King, C.R.B., 1882, Unknown, 310-312 (Article in Serial). SDV350430.

Mr Baker King comments on some of the architectural and monumental features of Totnes Church.

King, C.R.B., 1883, Notes on Totnes Church, 190-191 (Article in Serial). SDV350432.


The north aisle (built 1824) was extended, and in removing its north wall, several fragments of late norman masonry were found, including voussoirs, capitals, shafts etc in beerstone and red sandstone.

Loftus-Brock, E. P., 1883, The Peculiarities of the Ancient Churches of Devonshire, 27-34 (Article in Serial). SDV19516.

Windeatt, E., 1884, Nonconformity in Newton and its Neighbourhood, 489-490 (Article in Serial). SDV348896.

Parish church. Memorial to George Yeo and his mother formerly in the church. Inscribed:- 'here lieth the tree growing approved, / likewise her fruit of most beloved; / here lieth the stock and branch together, / free from all sturdy storms and weather: / here lieth the aged and the youth / the race of all approved truth'. /.

Chanter, J. F., 1890, 2nd Report on Devon Records, 59-65 (Article in Serial). SDV35442.

Keyser, C. E., 1898, On the Panel Paintings of Saints on the Devonshire Screens, 183-222 (Article in Serial). SDV134840.

Hughes, T.C., 1900, Notes on a Ramble in South Devon, 367 (Article in Serial). SDV350445.

Windeatt, E., 1900, Totnes: Its Mayors and Mayoralities, 1627-1676, 114 (Article in Serial). SDV168934.

In the Martyn's Aisle there was a stone with a Maynard crest cut on it, moved during the church restoration to a pavement under the tower arch. Inscribed to the memory of Christopher Maynard, died 1699, three times Mayor of Totnes.

Bligh Bond, F., 1902, Devonshire Screens and Rood Lofts, Plate 27 (Article in Serial). SDV15462.

Bligh Bond, F., 1903, Devonshire Screens and Rood Lofts. Part II, 490-491 (Article in Serial). SDV6113.

King, C.R.B., 1904, St Mary's Church, Totnes, 144-155, Figure 3 (Article in Serial). SDV350435.

An account of the church as it appeared before restoration by Gilbert Scott (1867-1897) and the restoration work carried out, appears in Baker King. Plan.

King, C.R.B., 1904-1905, St Mary's Church, Totnes, 152-153 (Article in Serial). SDV350444.

Visit in around 1904. Mr Baker King, under whose direction the church was restored in 1884, does not agree with this rendering of the inscription.

Gibbs, R., 1904-1905, The Memorials of Bishop Lacy, 118 (Article in Serial). SDV338000.

High up on the south face of the tower of the parish church, there are three niches surmounted by tall pinnacles, each of the side ones containing a sitting figure somewhat mutilated. In the central niche is a large bearded head. The words carved below are: 'i made this ture'.

Stabb, J., 1908, Some Old Devon Churches, 136-138, Plate 117 (Monograph). SDV348900.

Over the south door is a library of circa 300 volumes of theological works of 16th and 17th century, the pulpit and font are of the same date as the screen (circa 1460). The pulpit originally had panels of carved figures, but has been recut. The tower was struck by lightning in 1634 and 1799.

Chanter, J. F., 1910, Christianity in Devon before AD 909, 492, 496 (Article in Serial). SDV870.

Thompson, A. H., 1913, Church Architecture in Devon, 461, 468, 471, 486, 490 (Article in Serial). SDV15387.

Chanter, J. F., 1913, Fifth report of the Committee on Church Plate, 115 (Article in Serial). SDV312224.

Watkin, H.R., 1918-1919, Inscription in Totnes Church, 16-18 (Article in Serial). SDV350436.

There was said to be a Norman french inscription on a pew in Totnes Church .

Cresswell, B.F., 1918-1919, Inscription in Totnes Church, 45-47 (Article in Serial). SDV350437.

An article in the gentleman's magazine for august 1812 mistakenly ascribes this inscription to Totnes. It relates to Combe Florey Church in Somerset.

Rea, C.F., 1925, The Building of Totnes Church, 273,274-276,277-278,279-280,282-284 , Plate 9 (Article in Serial). SDV350438.

The re-building of the nave seems to have been in progress from about 1400-1445 when it was still incomplete. The chancel was built between 1445 and 1448, the tower begun about 1448 and the seating of the church unfinished in 1475. It is possible that the north aisle of the church was not built until about 1542-1553, as until the dissolution the land on which it stood belonged to the Priory. Little of the fabric of this aisle remains due to the addition of the outer north aisle. Full details of the 1445 agreement and 15th century rebuilding are given in this article.

St Mary Church tower. The building of the tower had begun by 1449, when Roger Growdon was appointed master mason, and an overseer was sent to view the towers at Callington, Buckland (Brewer), Tavistock and Ashburton. In 1451, an order was made that the parishoners be summoned to dig stones for the tower, and that a new quay be made near Totnes Bridge.

The agreement states: "and that another doorway for a processional pathway shall be constructed in height and width between the chancel and the priors church ". The blocking of this passage took place after 1866, in order to square off the northeast corner of the chancel.

Rea, C. F., 1927, Proceedings of the Congress of the British Archaeological Association at Exeter, 42 (Article in Serial). SDV350439.

Anonymous, 1930, Unknown, 550-552, 549 (Article in Serial). SDV169711.

Visit by the author who argues that Totnes Church tower was built along the lines of Ashburton Parish Church.

Church plate at St Mary's includes a plain paten of 1689, 2 flagons (1660 + 1629), 2 alms dishes (1689 + 1764) and 3 chalices (1551, 1689 + 1897). Fully described in Chanter. A chalice here has originally come from Ashprington Church (SX85NW/2), 1270 with Elizabethan cover.

Copeland, G. W., 1938, Seventh Report of the Plymouth and District Branch, 163 (Article in Serial). SDV343215.

Church Curiosities- Totnes, porch to internal rood-loft, staircase.

F. W. M. P, 1938-1939, Shields in Totnes Church, 276 (Article in Serial). SDV350440.

Fryer Cornelius, C., 1946, Ancient Devon Parish Churches within a Ten Mile Radius of Newton Abbot, 123-152 (Article in Serial). SDV312246.

Fryer Cornelius, C., 1947, Fittings, Furnishings and Finishings of the Ancient Devon Parish Churches within a Ten Mile Radius of Newton Abbot, 85 (Article in Serial). SDV312247.

St Mary's Church. Stone screen and parclose erected in 1459-1460. Lower panels formerly contained painting, now removed, though outlines can be traced. Rood loft stood over screen. Replaced by Georgian gallery with pews in 18th century. Removed at restoration of the church.

A visit in around 1946 (by Cornelius, C.F.) recorded that this screen is an exceedingly beautiful example - the only one in the area. It was erected by the corporation to be like that in Lady Chapel in Exeter Cathedral, and it is more beautiful. Tall narrow bays, ogee and painted arches combined in its tracery, main mullions embellished with tiers of canopied niches, capped with usual vaultings and cornice. Loft removed by Sir Gilbert Scott when he was restoring the church, and elaborated staircase left in chancel.

Fryer Cornelius, C., 1951, Mediaeval Effigies and other Sepulchral Memorials in the Parish Churches within a Ten-Mile Radius of Newton Abbot, 217-234 (Article in Serial). SDV339049.

Pevsner, N., 1952, The Buildings of England: South Devon, 296-297 (Monograph). SDV336217.

As seen, the church is entirely 15th century and later, consisting of nave, north and south aisle, with outer northern aisle, chancel and western tower. The tower is 120 foot high, with large polygonal pinnacles, image niches, and turns a real facade towards the High Street. The tower dates to the early 1450's; other parts of the church were built slightly earlier. The southern porch is 16th century with the original inner door. The outer north aisle was added in 1824, and enlarged and improved in 1869. Ceiled wagon roofs.

A visit confirms that the central figure has been identified as Bishop Lacy, and the others as Prior Stoke (of Totnes Priory) who gave money in 1445, and the then Earl of Devon.

Masson Phillips, E. N., 1952-1953, The Tower of Totnes Parish Church, 173-174 (Article in Serial). SDV350443.

Bayley, T.D.S., 1955, Painted Heraldic Panels, 77 (Article in Serial). SDV350429.

Bayley notes a rectangular painted and inscribed heraldic panel commemorating Walter Godridge in Totnes Church

Eden, P., 1957, Unknown, 114, 177 (Article in Serial). SDV169712.

There is detailed documentary evidence covering the 15th century rebuilding of the parish church (with a gap 1452-1475), in the form of the rolls of the manorial court.

The "processional way" was provided for in an ancient agreement of 1445 between the corporation and the prior, it was rendered necessary by the extension of the nave eastwards which brought together the ne corner of the parish church, and southwest corner of the conventual church. The passage is now blocked.

Russell, P., 1964, The Good Town of Totnes, 11, 34-44 (Unknown). SDV350407.

Parish Church of St Mary. Possible evidence for a Saxon church comes from a coin of Eadwig's reign, which is inscribed "sancta m. ". The church is known to have existed in 1088 when it was granted to SS Sergius and Baccus in Brittany. Plan.

Tower built of red sandstone, possibly quarried from the north side of Galmpton Creek

Copeland, G. W., 1965, Proceedings at the 103rd Annual Meeting, 25 (Article in Serial). SDV145408.

Woodford, I., 1965, Town the Nation May Adopt (Article in Serial). SDV56354.

Council of Archaeology identified Totnes is one of 51 towns which should be safeguarded as part of national heritage. Proposal meant that any planning would have to be considered by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government rather than just District councils.
Splendid Parish Church with its outstanding stone, rood-screen, dates from 1432-1460.

Slader, J. M., 1968, The Churches of Devon, 57, 62, 71, 75, 78, 88 (Monograph). SDV299468.

Screen is fashioned from beerstone, and erected by order of the corporation. The roofloft was of unusual depth and capacity, and the rood stairs were placed in the west wall of the nave rather than in one of the aisle walls as was more common. The loft would have been approached from the stairs by way of a gallery extending along the top of the northern parclose screen. Lysons records that the screens bore tabernacle work, and was painted and gilded. Illustration.

Department of Environment, 1978, Totnes, 47 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV342722.

Dated 16/03/1978. A visit confirmed that the tower was built to the designs of the master mason Roger Crowden, who may have been responsible for the work as a whole.

A visit recorded fine stone screen with 8 narrow, 2-light panels plus 2 for the doors to the nave; the sections separating the chancel chapels from the nave have 3 broader panels with depressed ogee arches, of which the middle ones serve as entrances; coved frieze and thin cornice.

Masson Phillips, E. N. (ed) + Worth, R. H., 1979, Church geology, 165 (Article in Serial). SDV145424.

The new red sandstone and conglomerate that were used in the building of this church were taken from medieval quarries in Torbay area.

French, H., 1980, Letter (Correspondence). SDV361872.

According to French, the church contains a small bronze plate with the initials of R. C. Tucker and 'A Lover of Dartmoor', who died during the First World War. The son of William Tucker; whose grocery firm Tucker and Sons was situated near the top of the High Street, Totnes.
The plate was originally affixed to a granite boulder somewhere on the west slope of Hameldon, but it subsequently went missing. It was rediscovered years later and returned to relatives, who in turn donated it to the church in Totnes where the man commemorated had worshipped.

SMA, 1984, Slide (Unknown). SDV350442.

Griffith, F. M., 1988, DAP/JO, 7-9 (Aerial Photograph). SDV177387.

Dated 11/01/1988.

Department of Environment, 1988, Totnes, 47 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV350434.

Formerly the Benedictine Priory Church of St Mary. The town had the use of the building, and in 1432 an agreement was reached between prior stone Mayor John Burhed for a complete rebuilding of the fabric, for which Bishop Lacy granted an indulgence.

Dated 16/03/1988. Monument to Walter Smith (died 1555) in the south chancel aisle.

Cherry, B. + Pevsner, N., 1989, The Buildings of England: Devon, 868-869 (Monograph). SDV325629.

The broad red west tower, 120 foot high, with big polygonal pinnacles, stands up near the top of the hill, a beacon from afar. The west tower is out of the ordinary in design. Nave and embattled sides, the south aisle also with pinnacles. An outer north aisle was added in 1824 and made larger and correct in 1869.

Interior- Ceiled wagon roofs with bosses in nave and chancel. The outstanding feature of the interior is the stone screen, one of the most perfect in England. Font is the usual octagonal 15th century type. Brass delabra acquired in 1701.

Griffith, F. M., 1990, DAP/SR, 14-15 (Aerial Photograph). SDV342909.

Dated 10/07/1990.

Roseveare, M.J. + Roseveare, A.C.K., 2007, St Mary's Church, Totnes: Geophysical Survey Report Produced for the Re-ordering Committee (Report - Geophysical Survey). SDV349896.

A ground penetrating radar survey was undertaken of all accessible parts of the church interior to inform upon the likely impact of relaying the floor upon archaeological features. Most areas of the church were at least sampled, and varous interesting results have emerged. There are a number of structures apparent beneath the northernmost aisle, within the nave and also within the chancel where at least one major vault, former masonry and graves were detected. The survey also appears ot confirm, at least in general terms, a plan drawn by Watkins in the early 1900s that purports to show the location of a previous church below the present one. See report for full details.

Elders, J., 2007, The Parish and Priory Church of St Mary, Totnes, Devon (Diocese of Exeter): Conservation Management Plan (Report - non-specific). SDV351194.

The Conservation Management Plan includes a detailed description of the building and site, its history and place in the community, as well assessments of its significance and vulnerabilities.

Ordnance Survey, 2012, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV348725.

English Heritage, 2012, National Heritage List for England (National Heritage List for England). SDV348729.

Formerly the Benedictine Priory Church of St Mary. The conventual buildings lay on the north side of the church (see Guildhall, Guildhall Yard). The town had the use of the building, and in 1432 on agreement was reached between Prior Stone and Mayor John Burhed for a complete rebuilding of the fabric, for which Bishop Lacy granted an indulgence. Nave, 1432-44; chancel, 1445-48; tower, 1449-59; screen 1459-60. The tower was built to the designs of master mason Roger Crowden, who may have been responsible for the work as a whole. 4 bay nave with aisles (outer north aisle added circa 1824 and remodelled circa 1869). 2 bay chancel with rood stair turret on north side (rood loft removed circa 1862 by Sir Gilbert Scott) and chancel aisle-chapels. Perpendicular style. Welsh slate roof with coped gables. Random Devonian limestone rubble with red sandstone dressings. The tower is entirely of red sandstone from Stoke Gabriel. Tower and chancel with set-back buttresses; nave and porch with diagonal buttresses. Crenellated aisles and chancel in white limestone with gargoyles and pinnacles. The 3 stage west tower was modelled on towers at Ashburton and Tavistock by the same minster unison, together with those at Buckland Brewer and Callington (Cornwall). The south (street) front of the truer of symmetrical composition with buttresses flanking a central stair turret. In a niche of the turret is a bearded, mitred head with the inscription "I made this tore", perhaps referring to Bishop Lacey, whose device, a knot, also appears on the screen inside. The tamer is capped by a crenellated parapet and large, polygonal pinnacles. Aisles with 4 light windows with panel tracery; 6 light east window by Scott. Gabled south porch with battlements and pinnacles; enriched, arched doorways with C16 inner door decorated in Early Renaissance manner; ceiling with ribs and bosses. Interior with ceiled wagon-roofs with bosses in nave and chancel. Fine stone screen with 8 narrow, 2-light panels plus 2 for the doors to the nave; the sections separating the chancel chapels from the nave have 3 broader panels with depressed ogee arches, of which the middle ones serve as entrances; coved frieze and thin cornice. 15the century octagonal front with quatrefoil panels. Stone pulpit with 2 tiers of cusped blank arches. Monument to Walter Smith (died 1555) in south chancel aisle.

Blaylock, S., 2017, St Mary's Church, Totnes: Historical and archaeological assessment of the churchyard (Report - Assessment). SDV361027.

This assessment was commissioned in January 2017 jointly by St Mary's Parochial Church Council (PCC) and the Totnes Trust to marshall the available evidence on the history and archaeology of the churchyard. Its main aim is to provide the background on the development of the churchyard and thereby to establish the potential archaeological, statutory, and practical constraints on future work, and to make some estimate of the likely nature of below-ground remains.

By and large the assessment does not include the parish church itself, although
mention will be made of aspects of the building where relevant to other considerations. The church has recently been the subject of a very full study in the shape of a Conservation Management Plan (Elders 2007, passim, but especially Appendix 2), and it is assumed that this will be available to be read in conjunction with the present report. To have given more detailed consideration to the church here would have made this already-long document significantly longer still.

Although the interior of the church lies beyond the scope of the present assessment it should be noted that this, too, has significant archaeological potential, as has been noted by Joe Elders: 'Any disturbance of the church floors has the potential to add to our knowledge of these early phases [i.e. pre-Conquest and 12th century] of the church.' (Elders 2007, 66). A geophysical survey within the footprint of the church has been carried out (in the context of a
proposal for a major re-ordering scheme including under-floor heating in c.2008); and the results of this add to our knowledge of below-ground conditions (above).

Physical remains of the 12th century church survive in the numerous architectural
fragments re-used in the east wall of the chancel (Figs 50–52), as well as those observed and published by Charles Baker King during the 1860s restoration and apparently since lost (Baker King 1904, 154 and pl. opposite; Elders 2007, 68; Fig. 53). More such fragments can be expected in any intervention in late medieval fabric (since the known fragments demonstrate that 12th century fabric was removed in order to construct the 15th century church), and possibly as 'finds' in the graveyard. It would also be worth conducting a systematic search of the structures surrounding the church for more such fragments.

Morris, J. E., Unknown, The Parish and Priory Church of St Mary Totnes (Pamphlet). SDV354630.

History and description of church. A church is believed to have stood here since the later 10th century. The present church, however, dates from the 15th century, the north aisle being added in 1542. The second north aisle was added in the early 19th century. The church was restored in the second half of the 19th century at which time the pews were replaced. See pamphlet for full details.

Sources / Further Reading

SDV134840Article in Serial: Keyser, C. E.. 1898. On the Panel Paintings of Saints on the Devonshire Screens. Archaeologia. 56. Unknown. 183-222.
SDV145408Article in Serial: Copeland, G. W.. 1965. Proceedings at the 103rd Annual Meeting. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 97. A5 Hardback. 25.
SDV145424Article in Serial: Masson Phillips, E. N. (ed) + Worth, R. H.. 1979. Church geology. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 111. A5 Paperback. 165.
SDV15387Article in Serial: Thompson, A. H.. 1913. Church Architecture in Devon. Archaeological Journal. 70. Unknown. 461, 468, 471, 486, 490.
SDV15462Article in Serial: Bligh Bond, F.. 1902. Devonshire Screens and Rood Lofts. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 34. Unknown. Plate 27.
SDV168929Article in Serial: Windeatt, E.. 1880. An Historical Sketch of Totnes. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 12. Hardback Volume. 166.
SDV168934Article in Serial: Windeatt, E.. 1900. Totnes: Its Mayors and Mayoralities, 1627-1676. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 32. Unknown. 114.
SDV169711Article in Serial: Anonymous. 1930. Unknown. Archaeological Journal. 70. Unknown. 550-552, 549.
SDV169712Article in Serial: Eden, P.. 1957. Unknown. Archaeological Journal. 114. Unknown. 114, 177.
SDV177387Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1988. DAP/JO. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 7-9.
SDV19516Article in Serial: Loftus-Brock, E. P.. 1883. The Peculiarities of the Ancient Churches of Devonshire. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 39. Unknown. 27-34.
SDV299468Monograph: Slader, J. M.. 1968. The Churches of Devon. The Churches of Devon. Unknown. 57, 62, 71, 75, 78, 88.
SDV312224Article in Serial: Chanter, J. F.. 1913. Fifth report of the Committee on Church Plate. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 45. A5 Hardback. 115.
SDV312246Article in Serial: Fryer Cornelius, C.. 1946. Ancient Devon Parish Churches within a Ten Mile Radius of Newton Abbot. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 78. A5 Hardback. 123-152.
SDV312247Article in Serial: Fryer Cornelius, C.. 1947. Fittings, Furnishings and Finishings of the Ancient Devon Parish Churches within a Ten Mile Radius of Newton Abbot. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 79. A5 Hardback. 85.
SDV325629Monograph: Cherry, B. + Pevsner, N.. 1989. The Buildings of England: Devon. The Buildings of England: Devon. Hardback Volume. 868-869.
SDV336217Monograph: Pevsner, N.. 1952. The Buildings of England: South Devon. The Buildings of England: South Devon. Paperback Volume. 296-297.
SDV338000Article in Serial: Gibbs, R.. 1904-1905. The Memorials of Bishop Lacy. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 3. Unknown. 118.
SDV339049Article in Serial: Fryer Cornelius, C.. 1951. Mediaeval Effigies and other Sepulchral Memorials in the Parish Churches within a Ten-Mile Radius of Newton Abbot. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 83. A5 Hardback. 217-234.
SDV342722List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1978. Totnes. Historic Houses Register. A4 Comb Bound. 47.
SDV342909Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1990. DAP/SR. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 14-15.
SDV343215Article in Serial: Copeland, G. W.. 1938. Seventh Report of the Plymouth and District Branch. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 70. A5 Hardback. 163.
SDV348725Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2012. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey. Map (Digital). [Mapped feature: #109275 ]
SDV348729National Heritage List for England: English Heritage. 2012. National Heritage List for England. Website.
SDV348896Article in Serial: Windeatt, E.. 1884. Nonconformity in Newton and its Neighbourhood. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 16. Unknown. 489-490.
SDV348900Monograph: Stabb, J.. 1908. Some Old Devon Churches. Some Old Devon Churches. 1. Unknown. 136-138, Plate 117.
SDV349327Article in Serial: Amery, J. S.. 1880. The Accounts of the Receiver of the Corporation of Totnes, in the Year 1554-5. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 12. Unknown. 327.
SDV349896Report - Geophysical Survey: Roseveare, M.J. + Roseveare, A.C.K.. 2007. St Mary's Church, Totnes: Geophysical Survey Report Produced for the Re-ordering Committee. ArchaeoPhysica Ltd. TOT071. A4 Comb Bound + Digital.
SDV350407Unknown: Russell, P.. 1964. The Good Town of Totnes. Unknown. 11, 34-44.
SDV350429Article in Serial: Bayley, T.D.S.. 1955. Painted Heraldic Panels. Antiquaries Journal. 35. Unknown. 77.
SDV350430Article in Serial: King, C.R.B.. 1882. Unknown. Antiquaries Journal. 39. Unknown. 310-312.
SDV350432Article in Serial: King, C.R.B.. 1883. Notes on Totnes Church. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 39. Unknown. 190-191.
SDV350434List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1988. Totnes. Historic Houses Register. Unknown. 47.
SDV350435Article in Serial: King, C.R.B.. 1904. St Mary's Church, Totnes. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 36. 144-155, Figure 3.
SDV350436Article in Serial: Watkin, H.R.. 1918-1919. Inscription in Totnes Church. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 10. Unknown. 16-18.
SDV350437Article in Serial: Cresswell, B.F.. 1918-1919. Inscription in Totnes Church. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 10. Unknown. 45-47.
SDV350438Article in Serial: Rea, C.F.. 1925. The Building of Totnes Church. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 57. 273,274-276,277-278,279-280,282-284 , Plate 9.
SDV350439Article in Serial: Rea, C. F.. 1927. Proceedings of the Congress of the British Archaeological Association at Exeter. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 33. Unknown. 42.
SDV350440Article in Serial: F. W. M. P. 1938-1939. Shields in Totnes Church. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 20. 276.
SDV350442Unknown: SMA. 1984. Slide. Unknown.
SDV350443Article in Serial: Masson Phillips, E. N.. 1952-1953. The Tower of Totnes Parish Church. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 25. 173-174.
SDV350444Article in Serial: King, C.R.B.. 1904-1905. St Mary's Church, Totnes. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. 3. Unknown. 152-153.
SDV350445Article in Serial: Hughes, T.C.. 1900. Notes on a Ramble in South Devon. Journal of the British Archaeological Association. 6. Unknown. 367.
SDV350448Article in Serial: Pengelly, W.. 1875. Devonshire Gleanings from 'Manningham's Diary'.. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 7. Unknown. 378.
SDV351194Report - non-specific: Elders, J.. 2007. The Parish and Priory Church of St Mary, Totnes, Devon (Diocese of Exeter): Conservation Management Plan. Council for the Care of Churches Report. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV35442Article in Serial: Chanter, J. F.. 1890. 2nd Report on Devon Records. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 22. A5 Paperback. 59-65.
SDV354630Pamphlet: Morris, J. E.. Unknown. The Parish and Priory Church of St Mary Totnes. Church Guide. Pamphlet.
SDV361027Report - Assessment: Blaylock, S.. 2017. St Mary's Church, Totnes: Historical and archaeological assessment of the churchyard. Blaylock, S.. Digital.
SDV361872Correspondence: French, H.. 1980. Letter. Letter. Digital.
SDV56354Article in Serial: Woodford, I.. 1965. Town the Nation May Adopt. The Western Morning News. Cutting + Digital.
SDV56474Article in Serial: Pengelly, W.. 1876. Devonshire Gleanings from 'Notes and Queries'. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 8. A5 Paperback. 769-770.
SDV6113Article in Serial: Bligh Bond, F.. 1903. Devonshire Screens and Rood Lofts. Part II. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 35. Digital. 490-491.
SDV870Article in Serial: Chanter, J. F.. 1910. Christianity in Devon before AD 909. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 42. A5 Hardback. 492, 496.

Associated Monuments

MDV104716Parent of: War Memorial in St. Mary's Church (Monument)
MDV9060Related to: Totnes Priory, north of Totnes Parish Church, Totnes (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV5950 - Geophysical Survey, St Mary's Church, Totnes
  • EDV7547 - Historical and Archaeological Assessment of the Churchyard: St Mary's Church, Totnes

Date Last Edited:Oct 3 2019 10:50AM