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HER Number:MDV9880
Name:Bishop's Palace, Bishopteignton

Summary

The remains of the Bishop's Palace comprise parts of the curtain walls and the ruins of the chapel, and elements are visible on aerial photoggraphs taken in 1988 and 1990.

Location

Grid Reference:SX 915 743
Map Sheet:SX97SW
Admin AreaDevon
Civil ParishBishopsteignton
DistrictTeignbridge
Ecclesiastical ParishBISHOPSTEIGNTON

Protected Status

Other References/Statuses

  • National Monuments Record: 447690
  • Old DCC SMR Ref: SX97SW/33
  • Old Listed Building Ref (II*): 85677
  • Old SAM County Ref: 200
  • Old SAM Ref: 24837
  • Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division: SX97SW1
  • SHINE Candidate (Yes)

Monument Type(s) and Dates

  • PALACE (XII to Late Medieval - 1200 AD to 1539 AD (Between))

Full description

Swete, R. J. (Revd), 1792-1801, 564M 'Picturesque Sketches of Devon' by Reverend John Swete, Vol. 10, 139, 141, 143 (Record Office Collection). SDV337942.

Illustrations of Bishops Palace by Swete.


Hawker, T., 1874, A sketch of Bishopsteignton, 412 (Article in Serial). SDV339298.


Ordnance Survey, 1880-1899, First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map (Cartographic). SDV336179.

'Bishop's Palace (Remains of)' shown on 19th century map with 'St John's Chapel (Remains of)' within it.


Reichel, O. J., 1915, The Hundred of Exminster in Early Times, 200-202,208,220,234 (Article in Serial). SDV285943.


Anon, 1933, Proceedings at the Seventy-Second Annual Meeting, 3 (Article in Serial). SDV340264.


Radford, C. + Radford, R., 1933, Twelfth Report on Ancient Monuments, 78 (Article in Serial). SDV346837.


Ordnance Survey, 1938, 110NW. Revision of 1933 with additions in 1938. Provisional Edition (Cartographic). SDV337410.


Radford, C. + Radford, R., 1939, 18th Report on Ancient Monuments, 67 (Article in Serial). SDV11940.

Remaining portion of palace purchased for preservation. Most important surviving part is the south wall of the hall.


Ministry of Works, 1950, Remains of the Bishop's Palace: Bishopsteignton (Schedule Document). SDV346831.

Remains of the Bishop's Palace include the remains of the chapel. About 46 metres to the east of the chapel is a piece of curtain wall of red sandstone running north and south in places 4.5 metres high, much overgrown with ivy. No features on inside, on outside a buttress at south end and traces of return westwards, but not in line with south wall of chapel. To the west of chapel a piece of curtain wall in prolongation of the south chapel wall, straight-jointed onto south-west angle. This returns to the north in 45.7 metres from the chapel, and part of it is incorporated in modern farmyard buildings. Probably built by Bishop Grandisson in 1330. Other details: Monument 200.


Department of Environment, 1952, Newton Abbot RD, 15 (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV304573.


Hoskins, W. G., 1954, A New Survey of England: Devon, 338-9 (Monograph). SDV17562.

Bishop's Palace remains. The Bishops of Exeter had one of their numerous "palaces" or country residences at Radway, just north-east of the village. Only a little 14th century walling remains of this. The bishops had a palace here as far back as the 13th century. It is probable that Grandisson restored the house in the first part of the 14th century. All that now remains are parts of the chapel. Foundations indicate the extent of the domestic buildings.


Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division, 1960, SX97SW1 (Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card). SDV346830.

Remains of the Bishop's Palace. With the exception of the chapel there are five pieces of walling which may be part of the palace. At the extreme east are the remains of the precinct wall, 4 metres high. A fragment of walling to the north-west, 3.5 metres long, is partly covered by earth. The farmyard buildings on the east and west incorporate featureless masonry walling from 2.0 metres to 3.0 metres high. The only indication of their connection with the palace is their thickness, at 0.8 metres, which conforms to the remains which are easily identified. All other walling in the farm buildings does not exceed 0.5 metres thick. Except for the precinct wall the remains are in poor condition and often reinforced with modern materials. The site is used as an extension to a farm.


Bosanko, J., 1980, The Archaeological Achievements 1929-1979: Devon Archaeological Society Jubilee Presidential Address, 3 (Article in Serial). SDV346829.

Efforts to purchase the remains of the Bishop's Palace at Bishopsteignton were not successful.


Clark, J. A., 1982, Bishop's Palace (Plan - measured). SDV346833.

Site and visible features surveyed at 1:200.


1983, Bishop's Palace (Photograph). SDV304574.


Morris, J., 1985, Domesday Book: Devon (Part One), 2.4 (Monograph). SDV356768.

Domesday Book records that Bishopsteignton was part of the lands held by the Bishop of Exeter and had been so prior to 1066.


Unknown, 1986 - 1987, Devon Religious Houses Survey (Un-published). SDV347681.


Dudley, E. R., 1987, Bishop's Palace (Worksheet). SDV346832.

Upstanding red sandstone wall, 45 metres long with a number of openings. Farmhouse built on site with stone from palace. Some documentation cited. Comments on repair work. Other details: Photo of 1981.


Laithwaite, J. M., 1987, Bishop's Palace, Bishopsteignton (Report - Survey). SDV346835.

The manor of Bishopsteignton belonged to the Bishops of Exeter prior to the conquest but the earliest documentary evidence indicating that they had a house there is not until the 13th century. In 1550 Bishop Veysey was compelled to dispose of his rural manors including Bishopsteignton and the manor then passed through a series of lessors and lessees until by the mid 18th century it was owned by the Comyns family. They still owned it at the time of the 1840 Tithe Award at which time the palace site, then called Old Walls was an orchard and part of Ash Hill Farm. The farm, which was purchased by the Dawe family in circa 1917 still includes the palace site.
Evidence suggests that the palace comprised a walled enclosure about 70 metres by 100 metres. In the middle of it was the chapel but the whereabouts of living quarters, kitchen, stables etc is unknown.
The remains of the palace stand on the hillside of a sheltered valley to the west of the Teign estuary. It was already ruined when Jeremiah Milles visited the site in the mid 18th century. Swete visited the site in 1795 and notes that the large square enclosure contained a barn and linhays. George Oliver, visiting in1840 found the main ruin much as it is today.
The remains consist primarily of the long south wall and the east gable wall of a late medieval building built of red sandstone rubble and a shaped and coursed pebbly red sandstone. Within the south wall are a row of six lancet windows, a doorway, a pair of openings one of which was probably also a doorway and the remains of four buttresses. The east wall has three lancet windows. A stone cross, now in the parish church, is reputed to have come from the apex of the gable. It is thought that the small recess on the inside of the south wall just east of the two openings which has a trefoiled head and a hollowed base was a holy water stoup leading to the interpretation of this building as a chapel. A plan of circa 1845 shows that the western gable wall lay between the two openings and the scars where it bonded to the south wall are still visible. It is noticeable that the ground level is higher on the inside than the outside which must have been how it was as the stoup and eastern doorway seem to be at about the right level. The doorway would have originally needed, therefore, a flight of steps outside to reach it.
The chapel now forms the southern edge of a rectangular courtyard surrounded by farm buildings. The Tithe Map shows just two buildings. On the east side is a large building, possibly a barn with what appears to be a horse engine house on its west side, while on the west side is a smaller building which still survives embedded in later structures which was probably a cart shed. The building on the east side also survives although the engine house has gone. It generally appears 19th century in date although there is some evidence of earlier walling. Along the west side of the courtyard is a tall red sandstone wall with putlog holes, its short east return at the northern end broadly level with the south wall of a 19th century shippon. The western boundary wall has shippons built against it on both sides. That on its west side is a substantial structure in yellow brick which was apparently a cider store. The boundary wall stops at a farm gate at its southern end but must have originally carried on to meet the continuation of the southern wall of the chapel. On the east side of the site, following the line of the road, is another boundary wall at least 3.35 metres high, also with putlog holes and a buttress at its southern end similar to those on the south wall of the chapel.
Laithwaite, also notes two other features of interest. Firstly, in the north-east corner of the site is a piece of boggy ground which is reputed to have been a fish pond but was probably a drinking trough. It is fed by a spring rising in the corner of the site. Secondly the area to the south of the chapel is known to be paved, although it is now grass covered.
The site is generally considered to be in good condition with areas of undisturbed ground which may once have carried buildings. There are now two large 20th century barns on the eastern half of the site. One appears to be built on the existing ground surface but a platform was excavated for the second one although apparently no foundations were exposed when this was done.


Hunt, P. J., 1987, Bishopsteignton Tithe Map (Cartographic). SDV357975.

Annotated tracing from 1840 Tithe Map giving field names.


Devon County Council, 1988, DAP/6047, DAP 6047/10-12 11-JAN-1988 (JM) (Aerial Photograph). SDV361637.

Both ruinous and extant structures, including elements of the chapel, are visible.


Griffith, F. M., 1988, DAP/JM, 10-12 (Aerial Photograph). SDV346838.


Youngs, S. M. + Clark, J. + Gaimster, D. R. M. + Barry, T., 1988, Medieval Britain and Ireland in 1987, 225-314 (Article in Serial). SDV75013.

Fabric recorded in 1987 in advance of cleaning and consolidation. The surviving buildings were probably constructed by Bishop John Grandisson (1327-69) and comprise a section of perimeter wall, the south and east walls of a chapel and other masonry fragments. Identification of different stone types and style of masonry enabled processes and stages of construction to be elucidated. Other observations contributed additions to the plan of the palace.


Blaylock, S. R. + Westcott, K. A., 1988, The Bishop's Palace at Bishopsteignton: A Survey of the South Range (Report - Survey). SDV336518.

Survey carried out prior to consolidation work. Structural remains comprise south and east walls of building identified as chapel, with further length of wall abutting it to west. Length of boundary wall represents eastern limit of site. Remains of various other structures now incorporated into farm buildings around yard. Various architectural fragments observed built into modern west wall of farm building on east of yard - three beer stone fragments representing half of capping of circular chimney; section of moulded beer stone window mullion. These fragments indicate range and quality of architectural ornament not seen in surviving fabric. Fragments of north boundary wall survive at base of steep slope to north.


Teignmouth Post, 1989, Bishop's Palace Plaque Unveiled (Article in Serial). SDV361511.

Devon Archaeological Society has erected a plaque at the ancient Bishop's palace at Ash Hill Farm, Bishopsteignton, setting out its history.

The plaque one of a series to be planned throughout the county for the society's 60th anniversary year was unveiled by the society president.
Built by John Gradisson Bishop of Exeter, in the 14th century, the building now consists of a chapel with lancet windows and original doorway, medieval domestic buildings and parts of the boundary wall.

Recent conservation work on what is now a scheduled ancient monument was instigated by Bishopsteignton Parish Council.


Laithwaite, M. + Blaylock, S. R. + Westcott, K. A., 1989, The Bishop's Palace at Bishopsteignton, 53-69 (Article in Serial). SDV346834.

Documentary evidence and results of 1987 survey. The palace consisted of an inner enclosure with a chapel on the south side and a domestic building on the east side, with an irregular outer enclosure to the south and east, surrounded by high walls. The whereabouts of many of the buildings is unknown. Other details: Plans and photographs.


Devon County Council, 1990, DAP/6872, DAP 6872/6 04-JUN-1990 (RH) (Aerial Photograph). SDV355459.

Both ruinous and extant structures, including elements of the chapel, are visible.


Griffith, F. M., 1990, DAP/RH, 5-6 (Aerial Photograph). SDV346839.


Gibbons, P., 1993, Bishop's Palace, Bishopsteignton, 134667 (Un-published). SDV346836.

Site visit 6th August 1993. Visible remains exist as ruined and adapted structures terraced in two levels into hillside, including irregular outer court, north-west corner of which incorporates a square inner court defined in part by building remains. Site bordered to east and west by small streams, the west one culverted for part of its course. Inner court layout indicates that buildings were grouped around a central open space on the upper terrace. Principal standing remains are those of st. John's chapel, forming se corner of court. Extending west from south-west corner of chapel is a length of wall built to over 4.5 metres high in three lifts. Inner court measures 38 metres east to west by 34 metres north to south. Towards the north-east corner Medieval walls are incorporated within later structures and comprise a 3 metres high fragment of dwelling including external corner, fireplace, buttresses and a shallow rectangular stone-lined pit previously interpreted as a garderobe. West wall of similar height. A secondary entrance may have existed in the north-west corner. At south end of west wall is evidence of a further building. Outer court 94 metres east to west by 55 metres north to south. East wall survives 44 metres long, 3.5 metres high, 0.75 metres thick, with stepped coping. Evidence for a building at south end of wall. North wall survives only as foundations. West wall has been exposed as a line of foundations extending south from corner of inner court to edge of road. Plan should show it as a single straight alignment (mpp).
Des=mpp/


Department of Environment, 1994, Bishop's Palace, Bishopsteignton (Schedule Document). SDV346840.

The Bishop's Palace is situated at the head of a small valley on the north side of the Teign estuary, just to the north-east of the village of Bishopsteignton. The monument includes the upstanding and buried remains of a palace of the bishops of Exeter in use from the second half of the 13th century until 1550. The visible remains exist in the form of a number of ruined and adapted structures terraced in two levels into the hillside and incorporated into the more recent buildings of a working farm. They include an outer court of irregular shape, the north-west corner of which incorporates a square inner court defined in part by the remains of buildings. Small streams border the site to its immediate east and west. The walls are constructed of random-rubble utilising local red sandstone and breccia, with carved details in contrasting white Beer stone. The layout of the inner court indicates that buildings were grouped around a central open space on the upper terrace. The principal standing remains are those of St John's chapel, forming the south-east corner of the court, of which the east gable-end and the south wall survive, the former to a height of 8.1 metres. The chapel is 20 metres by 7 metres overall, with buttressed walls pierced at a high level by lancet windows in carved Beer stone. There are three windows in the gable-end and seven in the south wall. The south wall has a stoup, a recess for holding holy water, made from Beer stone set into its inner face, and two doors, devoid of decorative stonework, that open into the outer court which is up to 2 metres lower. Extending westward from the south-west corner of the chapel is a length of wall built to over 4.5 metres high externally and including part of the string-course of the coping. The inner court measures 38 metres east/west by 34 metres north/south overall. Towards its north-east corner Medieval walls are incorporated within later structures and comprise a 3 metres high fragment of a dwelling which includes an eternal corner, fireplace, buttresses, and a shallow rectangular stone-lined pit, half filled with water. The west wall of the court is of equivalent height and similarly incorporated, its northern limit having a return to the east. The outer court measures 94 metres east/west by 55 metres north/south. It would have originally contained ancillary buildings and the main gateway. The east wall is the best surviving section, 44 metres in length, 3.5 metres high, and retaining a triangular, stepped coping. Its southern end is much lower and marked by a buttress and a wall return, rendered internally, which is indicative of a building in that area, although it is now badly overgrown. The north wall only survives as foundations. The north side of the palace is terraced into the hill slope by up to 3 metres. The western wall of the outer court has been exposed in the past as a line of foundations extending south from the corner of the inner court. On the south side there are no identifiable remains, the substantial bank and hedge adjacent to the road are presumed to follow the line of the outer court. Fragments of carved Beer stone were built into the wall of a modern farm building on the east side of the inner court. These indicate a range and quality of architectural decoration not exemplified in the surviving structures. Within the area of the palace the buried remains appear to be extensive and not covered to any great depth. The manor of Bishopsteignton belonged to the bishops of Exeter before the Norman Conquest. There is no evidence of a dwelling until the episcopal registers commence in the second half of the 13th century which record that Bishop Bronescombe (1257-80) was present in the manor for several days in each of nine different years. The principal reference to structural work occurs in the will of Bishop Grandisson (1327-69) which states that he obtained the appropriation of the chapel from Rome in 1331/2 and, `...erected convenient and sumptuous buildings there..'. The institution of priests in the chapel in 1373/4 is the first entry in the registers referring directly to the site, but it is not until Bishop Lacy (1420-55) that it is regularly mentioned as a place where official acts were undertaken. The registers of subsequent bishops have not been published, but a survey undertaken after the bishopric of Redman (1495-1501) states that the buildings had become ruinous. In 1550 Edward VI compelled Bishop Vesey to dispose of the manor which was conveyed to Richard Duke through Sir Andrew Dudley. Subsequent changes in ownership have been traced down to the present. In the mid 18th century Dean Milles recorded that the site was badly ruined. In 1795 the site was being used as a farmyard with the inner court containing barns and linhays. It was at this time that the ruins were first described as a palace rather than a manor. At the time of the 1840 Tithe Map the site was in use as an orchard, and later reverted to more active farm use which continues at present. The standing remains are listed Grade II*. The chapel and the south wall of the inner court were consolidated in 1987 following a structural survey which included a plan and partial description of most of the recognisable Medieval features on the site. Some reconstruction was undertaken on the buttresses and tops of the walls of the chapel. Other limited excavations and clearance work have been undertaken in recent years. The following are excluded from the scheduling: all modern farm buildings, structures, permanent farm fixtures, concrete hard-standings, gate and fence posts, although the ground beneath all these features is included. The Bishop's Palace at Bishopsteignton is a good example of one of the smaller and more compact forms of this class of monument in which both an inner and outer court remain in existence. The buried remains appear to be extensive and relatively unharmed by subsequent activity. Other details: Monument 24837.


Department of National Heritage, 1997, Scheduled Monument Consent Letter (Correspondence). SDV304562.

Scheduled Monument Consent granted for the construction of three new agricultural buildings.


Parker, R. + Allan, J. + Fletcher, M. + Higham, R. + Laithwaite, M., 2006, The Bishop's Palace at Chudleigh, 226 (Article in Serial). SDV338151.

The Bishop's Palace at Bishopsteignton where the enclosure wall had buildings abutting. In one area, however, the outer wall of a building (chapel) is also the perimeter and is pierced by this structure's windows. The style of the windows coupled with a strong historical tradition suggests that the site was built or developed by Bishop Grandisson. As there are no indications of crenellations or arrow-loops it seems less likely that the enclosing of the site resulted from the 1379 licence to crenellate.


National Monuments Record, 2011, 447690 (National Monuments Record Database). SDV346841.

Bishops Palace constructed during the 13th century and enlarged during the 14th century.


English Heritage, 2011, Historic Houses Register (List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest). SDV346128.

Ruins of Bishop's Palace at Ash Hill Farm in Bishopsteignton was Listed on 23rd August 1955. Parts of curtain walls and remains of chapel. Probably early 14th century. Red sandstone and brecchia rubble, neatly dressed with some evidence of render on the curtain walling; chapel dressings a yellowish stone, possibly Salcombe Regis.
Plan: A stretch of tall wall to the east of the site and a second section approximately 100 metres to the west appear to indicate the width of the enclosing walls of the site; a recently exposed lower section of wall to the north may be the remains of the north enclosing wall. The chapel remains consist of a tall south wall and east wall with cusped lancet windows. There are several farmbuildings on the site and the west curtain wall is within a cattle shed. Although the site has been extensively robbed for building material the surviving remains above ground are of major interest and features, including a flight of stone steps, are known to survive below ground. The east curtain wall, about 50 metres long with some putlog holes, retains some coping. At the south end it returns with an external coped buttress. The west wall, about 40 metres long, also retains some coping and seems to have been broken through at the south end to form an entrance to the farmyard. Other details: LBS Number 85677.


Ordnance Survey, 2011, MasterMap (Cartographic). SDV346129.

'Bishop's Palace (remains of)' shown on modern mapping.


Hegarty, C., Knight, S. and Sims, R., 2018-2019, The South Devon Coast to Dartmoor Aerial Investigation and Mapping Survey. Area 1, Haldon Ridge to Dart Valley (AI&M) (Interpretation). SDV361305.

Aerial photographs taken in 1988 and 1990 show the farmyears as extant and roofless buildings, including the surviving elements of the chapel. No elements are visible that have not been depicted on 19th and 20th century OS mapping so they have not been transcribed.


Rogers, R. A., 24/05/1932, Survey of Chapel of Bishop's Palace at Bishopsteignton (Plan - measured). SDV357972.


Unknown, Unknown, Bishop's Palace, Bishopsteignton (Cartographic). SDV357974.

Annotated map of the Bishop's Palace

Sources / Further Reading

SDV11940Article in Serial: Radford, C. + Radford, R.. 1939. 18th Report on Ancient Monuments. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 71. A5 Paperback. 67.
SDV17562Monograph: Hoskins, W. G.. 1954. A New Survey of England: Devon. A New Survey of England: Devon. A5 Hardback. 338-9.
SDV285943Article in Serial: Reichel, O. J.. 1915. The Hundred of Exminster in Early Times. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 47. A5 Hardback. 200-202,208,220,234.
SDV304562Correspondence: Department of National Heritage. 1997. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Scheduled Monument Consent Letter. Letter.
SDV304573List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: Department of Environment. 1952. Newton Abbot RD. Historic Houses Register. A4 Single Sheet. 15.
SDV304574Photograph: 1983. Bishop's Palace. Slide.
SDV336179Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1880-1899. First Edition Ordnance 25 inch map. First Edition Ordnance Survey 25 inch Map. Map (Digital).
SDV336518Report - Survey: Blaylock, S. R. + Westcott, K. A.. 1988. The Bishop's Palace at Bishopsteignton: A Survey of the South Range. Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit Report. 88.02. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV337410Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 1938. 110NW. Revision of 1933 with additions in 1938. Provisional Edition. Second Edition Ordnance Survey Six inch Map. Map (Paper).
SDV337942Record Office Collection: Swete, R. J. (Revd). 1792-1801. 564M 'Picturesque Sketches of Devon' by Reverend John Swete. Devon Record Office Collection. Unknown + Digital. Vol. 10, 139, 141, 143.
SDV338151Article in Serial: Parker, R. + Allan, J. + Fletcher, M. + Higham, R. + Laithwaite, M.. 2006. The Bishop's Palace at Chudleigh. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 64. Paperback Volume. 226.
SDV339298Article in Serial: Hawker, T.. 1874. A sketch of Bishopsteignton. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 6 Part 2. A5 Hardback. 412.
SDV340264Article in Serial: Anon. 1933. Proceedings at the Seventy-Second Annual Meeting. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 65. A5 Hardback. 3.
SDV346128List of Blds of Arch or Historic Interest: English Heritage. 2011. Historic Houses Register. Historic Houses Register. Website.
SDV346129Cartographic: Ordnance Survey. 2011. MasterMap. Ordnance Survey. Map (Digital). [Mapped feature: #110283 ]
SDV346829Article in Serial: Bosanko, J.. 1980. The Archaeological Achievements 1929-1979: Devon Archaeological Society Jubilee Presidential Address. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 38. Paperback Volume. 3.
SDV346830Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card: Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division. 1960. SX97SW1. Ordnance Survey Archaeology Division Card. Card Index.
SDV346831Schedule Document: Ministry of Works. 1950. Remains of the Bishop's Palace: Bishopsteignton. The Schedule of Monuments. Foolscap.
SDV346832Worksheet: Dudley, E. R.. 1987. Bishop's Palace. Worksheet.
SDV346833Plan - measured: Clark, J. A.. 1982. Bishop's Palace. Plan.
SDV346834Article in Serial: Laithwaite, M. + Blaylock, S. R. + Westcott, K. A.. 1989. The Bishop's Palace at Bishopsteignton. Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society. 47. Paperback Volume. 53-69.
SDV346835Report - Survey: Laithwaite, J. M.. 1987. Bishop's Palace, Bishopsteignton. Devon Religious Houses Survey. 17. A4 Stapled + Digital.
SDV346836Un-published: Gibbons, P.. 1993. Bishop's Palace, Bishopsteignton. Monument Protection Programme. Archaeological Item Dataset.. A4 Stapled. 134667.
SDV346837Article in Serial: Radford, C. + Radford, R.. 1933. Twelfth Report on Ancient Monuments. Transactions of the Devonshire Association. 65. A5 Hardback. 78.
SDV346838Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1988. DAP/JM. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 10-12.
SDV346839Aerial Photograph: Griffith, F. M.. 1990. DAP/RH. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). 5-6.
SDV346840Schedule Document: Department of Environment. 1994. Bishop's Palace, Bishopsteignton. The Schedule of Monuments. A4 Stapled.
SDV346841National Monuments Record Database: National Monuments Record. 2011. 447690. National Monuments Record Database. Website.
SDV347681Un-published: Unknown. 1986 - 1987. Devon Religious Houses Survey. Devon Religious Houses Survey. Mixed Archive Material.
SDV355459Aerial Photograph: Devon County Council. 1990. DAP/6872. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). DAP 6872/6 04-JUN-1990 (RH).
SDV356768Monograph: Morris, J.. 1985. Domesday Book: Devon (Part One). Domesday Book: Devon (Part One). 1. Hardback Volume. 2.4.
SDV357972Plan - measured: Rogers, R. A.. 24/05/1932. Survey of Chapel of Bishop's Palace at Bishopsteignton. A3 Single Sheet + Digital.
SDV357974Cartographic: Unknown. Unknown. Bishop's Palace, Bishopsteignton. A3 Single Sheet + Digital.
SDV357975Cartographic: Hunt, P. J.. 1987. Bishopsteignton Tithe Map. A4 single Sheet + Digital.
SDV361305Interpretation: Hegarty, C., Knight, S. and Sims, R.. 2018-2019. The South Devon Coast to Dartmoor Aerial Investigation and Mapping Survey. Area 1, Haldon Ridge to Dart Valley (AI&M). Historic England Research Report. Digital.
Linked documents:1
SDV361511Article in Serial: Teignmouth Post. 1989. Bishop's Palace Plaque Unveiled. Teignmouth Post. Photocopy + Digital.
SDV361637Aerial Photograph: Devon County Council. 1988. DAP/6047. Devon Aerial Photograph. Photograph (Paper). DAP 6047/10-12 11-JAN-1988 (JM).
SDV75013Article in Serial: Youngs, S. M. + Clark, J. + Gaimster, D. R. M. + Barry, T.. 1988. Medieval Britain and Ireland in 1987. Medieval Archaeology. 32. Unknown. 225-314.

Associated Monuments

MDV9881Parent of: St John's Chapel at Bishop's Palace, Bishopsteignton (Building)
MDV22187Related to: 10 Radway Street, Bishopsteignton (Building)
MDV21826Related to: Borough of West Teignmouth (Monument)
MDV9141Related to: Bradley Manor, Newton Abbot (Building)
MDV21546Related to: MANOR HOUSE in the Parish of Bishopsteignton (Building)
MDV16983Related to: The Manor of Bishopsteignton (Monument)
MDV16268Related to: West Teignmouth (Monument)
MDV9830Related to: White Well, Bishopsteignton (Monument)

Associated Finds: none recorded

Associated Events

  • EDV7515 - The South Devon Coast to Dartmoor Aerial Investigation and Mapping (formerly NMP) Survey (Ref: ACD1748)

Date Last Edited:Jun 13 2019 6:01PM