HeritageGateway - Home

Login  |  Register
Site Map
Text size: A A A
You are here: Home > > > > Shropshire HER Result
Shropshire HERPrintable version | About Shropshire HER | Visit Shropshire HER online...

HER Number (PRN):00052
Name:Shrawardine castle and settlement remains
Type of Record:Monument
Protected Status:Listed Building (II) 1366944: REMAINS OF SHRAWARDINE CASTLE
Scheduled Monument 1015707: Shrawardine castle

Monument Types

  • CASTLE (12th century to 15th century - 1100 AD to 1499 AD)
  • MOTTE AND BAILEY (12th century to 15th century - 1100 AD to 1499 AD)
  • SHELL KEEP (12th century to 15th century - 1100 AD to 1499 AD)
  • SHRUNKEN VILLAGE (12th century to 15th century - 1100 AD to 1499 AD)

Summary

Scheduled Monument: Shrawardine Castle is a good example of a medieval shell keep castle (one enclosed by a stone wall), which is well documented and has been shown to contain significant archaeological remains. It is of particular interest because of its association with medieval settlement earthworks and its proximity to the parish church and the nearby Little Shrawardine castle.

Parish:Montford, Shrewsbury and Atcham, Shropshire
Map Sheet:SJ41NW
Grid Reference:SJ 4006 1537

Related records: None recorded

Associated Finds: None recorded

Associated Events

  • ESA3430 - 1994 Evaluation of site proposed for redevelopment at Shrawardine Farm by SCCAS
  • ESA4217 - 1976 field observation by SCC SMR
  • ESA4218 - 1961 field observation by the Ordnance Survey
  • ESA4219 - 1968 field observation by English Heritage
  • ESA4220 - 1980 field observation by English Heritage
  • ESA4221 - 1982 field observation by English Heritage
  • ESA4222 - 1991 Evaluation in advance of proposed redevelopment of part of Shrawardine Farm by SCCAS
  • ESA4223 - 1992 field observation by SCC SMR
  • ESA4224 - 1992 Excavation of a bank and ditch at Shrawardine Farm by SCCAS
  • ESA4755 - 2001 Archaeological Survey at Shrawardine Castle by CPAT
  • ESA4756 - 2001 Geophysical Survey at Shrawardine Castle by Archaeophysica (Ref: SHW20011)
  • ESA4870 - 2001 Section 17 Management Agreement (5 years) by English Heritage
  • ESA4933 - 1987 Assessment of SCC landholdings at Shrawardine (Shrawardine Special Project)
  • ESA5011 - 1997-1998 Assessment and building recording prior to consolidation work at Shrawardine Castle
  • ESA5932 - 2004 WB on groundworks at Castle Croft, Shrawardine by Castlering Archaeology

Description

Castle built on order of Henry I in early C12, destroyed by Welsh c 1215 and rebuilt 1240. Demolished 1645 <1b><1c>

There was a collapse of stone in c Dec 1983 <16>

A proposal to redevelop part of Shrawardine Farm, to the south of the main castle earthworks, led to an evaluation in October 1991. Four trenches in the western half of the redevelopment site demonstrated that it was sterile archaeologically. The excavation of Trench G, at c SJ4025 1530, revealed the presence of a ditch, perhaps associated with earthworks still visible to the north and of presumed medieval date. Trenches A, B and H were located further to the east again, in an area supposedly once occupied by a C19 agricultural building, although no trace of it was found. Trenches A and H revealed pre C17 postholes, perhaps of a structure associated with the occupation of the outer bailey of the castle. It was recommended that if the redevelopment involved ground works in the two areas where archaeological features had been demonstrated, that excavation be undertaken in advance <21>

In March 1992 stock erosion at the site was recorded <22>

In August 1992 the Historic Environment Group drew up a schedule of repairs both to the masonry of the castle and the eroded motte. This was to include a photogrammetric survey of the masonry. It was sent to the SCC Estates Section <23>

In July 1992 a more detailed investigation of the ditch found in Trench G in the 1991 evaluation was undertaken. This work showed that the ditch is likely to be medieval in origin…and to have had a short lifespan, with rapid infilling and no recutting. A bank was found to run along the NE side of the ditch. It seems likely that its core is contemporary with the ditch and that it was constructed from the upcast from the latter. There was no evidence of any revetment to the bank, and so rapid erosion is likely. The size and steep sided profile of the ditch suggest that it was a defensive earthwork. It is probable that the ditch and bank marked the western boundary of the outer bailey on the south side of the castle, running south from the inner bailey along the line now marked by the scarp on the west side of the smallholding .. Cartographic evidence suggests that by the C19 this outer bailey had been absorbed by the farm complex. <25>

Evaluation carried out on land adjacent to Shrawardine Castle in February 1994 by Shropshire County Council Archaeology Unit in conjunction with development proposals for the site. The proposed development site was thought to encroach on the outer bailey, south of the castle. The site of the castle is contained within the property of Shrawardine Farm. The motte, inner bailey and at least one of the outer baileys are situated in permanent pasture to the north of the farm complex. The castle was occupied from the Norman period until the Civil War. Previous excavations on the site had identified the presence of an outer bailey on this site but not its extent. The earthworks consisting of a linear bank and hollow were shown to be defensive in nature, the earliest residual 12–13th century pottery within the surviving layers of the bank suggesting a construction date towards the end of this period. It seems most likely that the bank and ditch marked the eastern side of an outer bailey. The partial survival of the ditch, as suggested by the 1728 plan of the farm would appear to be confirmed by the presence of post medieval artefacts in the upper fills. The evaluation also confirmed the existence of a medieval pottery kiln and the remains of post medieval farm buildings. <27>

Remains of castle. C12. Red sandstone rubble with the remains of some dressed sandstone. Fragmentary remains of a shell keep on a motte. The motte and bailey existed before 1165. The castle was slighted in 1644. County A.M. No. 72. B.O.E., P.247; Derek Renn, Norman Castles in Britain, p.311 <28>

Evaluated for MPP in 1990-1, High score as one of 46 Motte and Bailey castles; one of less than 10 Shellkeeps <29>

Scheduling affirmed in 1997. Scheduling description: ->

-> The monument includes Shrawardine castle, a shell keep castle with the remains of a stone keep, motte, three baileys and associated settlement earthworks situated on the north bank of the River Severn nine miles west of Shrewsbury. The castle is sited in an elevated position overlooking the river to control a crossing point and, with Little Shrawardine castle 800m west (the subject of a separate scheduling), is one of two castles designed to defend both sides of the ford. The fragmentary standing remains of the shell keep are Listed Grade II. ->

-> [The section of the scheduling description describing the history of the castle in some detail has been omitted]. ->

-> Today the castle includes the remains of a motte and a shell keep at the centre of an extensive earthwork complex. The keep is represented by the fragmentary remains of two partly buried undercroft arches and some fragments of walling. The walling is built of squared sandstone blocks and is battered (inwardly sloping) in the lower courses. The substantial nature of the fragments that survive suggest that, when intact, the keep was a powerful fortification. The castle mound, or motte, is irregular in plan having been disturbed by later stone robbing. However it remains a substantial mound with overall dimensions of 50m east to west by 30m north to south standing up to 5m high on its west side, 3.lm high elsewhere. Each face of the mound has been cut into, forming a series of concave quarry hollows. At the south west and south east corners are roughly semicircular mounds which may represent the sites of corner towers. On its north east side the mound falls to a flat platform which extends from the motte to the bailey ditch; this may indicate the site of a large building. ->

-> To the immediate north and east of the motte are the remains of the inner bailey enclosure. It is roughly rectangular in plan with maximum dimensions of 90m north east to south west by 50m north west to south east. The bailey is bounded along its northern side by a scarp 0.6m high with an outer ditch 0.5m deep. Around the east side it is bounded by a well defined scarp up to 2m high which curves around towards the west at its southern end before fading out. The inner bailey may have always been open to the small outer bailey which lies along this south side. Although the surviving visible earthworks of this bailey or enclosure are fragmentary, its plan can be traced as a roughly rectangular enclosure with dimensions of approximately 50m north west to south east by 40m transversely. The east side of the bailey remains visible as a low scarp up to 0.6m high running for approximately 50m on a north to south alignment, with evidence of an outer ditch visible as a slight hollow 0.2m deep. An exploratory trench was cut across this feature as part of an archaeological evaluation carried out by Shropshire Leisure Services Archaeological Unit (SLSAU) early in 1994. The excavation revealed that the defences comprised a bank surmounted by a timber palisade separated from an outer ditch by a berm 1.8m wide. The ditch itself was found to survive as a buried feature 3.6m wide and 1.9m deep, with a steep v-shaped profile. The southern end of the bailey is no longer visible as a surface feature, however the west side remains visible as a well defined scarp up to 1.2m high which curves northwards towards the motte. ->

-> During the 1994 excavations a two-chambered pottery kiln of 12th to 13th century date was identified immediately outside the bailey. It is the first kiln of its type to be discovered in Shropshire and is included within the scheduling. ->

-> On high ground to the north east of the motte are the remains of a second and larger outer bailey-with internal dimensions of approximately 80m north to south by 64m east to west. It is separated from the motte and inner bailey by a well defined ditch up to 6m wide and 0.6m deep with fragments of a flanking counter-scarp bank up to 0.4m high along its northern edge. The bailey is defended around its west side by a broad spread rampart averaging 10m wide and up to 1.2m high on its outer face, 0.5m on its inner. The scarp of an outer ditch 0.5m deep runs for some 6m to the west of the rampart and is now surmounted by a hedge. This western rampart fades out at its northern end adjacent to a large pond which lies at the north west corner of the bailey enclosure. Around the east side the bailey defences can be traced as a broad spread rampart up to 12m wide and 0.6m high. This is interrupted approximately 40m from its southern terminal by an original entrance gap 4m wide. This eastern rampart ends on the steepening slope above the pond occupying the north east corner of the site. ->

-> On the lower ground to the west of the castle, between the motte and the modern lane, are the earthwork remains of a hollow way and a series of well defined house platforms. These are a part of the medieval settlement which existed close to the castle. Their desertion may have resulted from economic difficulties which occurred due to crop failure following flooding during the early 14th century. Alternatively, the earthworks may represent houses which were razed to clear a field of fire during the Civil War siege of the castle in 1645. ->

-> Metalled surfaces, structures and fences which fall within the protected area are excluded from the scheduling although the ground beneath all these features is included.<30>

Topographical survey [ESA4755] in conjunction with geophysical survey [ESA4756] carried out by CPAT on behalf of Montford Parish Millennium Green Trust at Shrawardine Castle. The results from the survey revealed important new information for the layout of the castle and the surrounding village. The survey has shown that the original castle consisted of a motte, surrounded by a large ditch, to the east of which was an oval bailey. The bailey was later enlarged with the addition of an outer bailey on the south side. Informative as the individual surveys were, the combination of techniques allowed for a greater examination of Shrawardine’s history providing further insight into how the castle may have developed and what form that may have taken. <31><32><32a>

Assessment and building recording of Shrawardine castle from 1997 to 1998 in conjunction with consolidation works by Shropshire County Council. The fragile ruins of the castle, destroyed in the Civil War, lie just to the east of the village and its small church. It is a scheduled ancient monument and is owned by the County Council. The survey was commissioned to analyse the fabric of the ruins and provide a detailed survey of the upstanding masonry. ->

Shrawardine castle was once evidently a large castle. The surviving fragment of the west wall indicates a building of good quality and high status. The mound was either partially manmade or an entirely natural one scarped to improve its defensive capabilities. There is archaeological evidence to suggest the position of one, possibly two round towers on this defensive circuit and there were presumably several others. It is not clear if there was a keep on the mound top, but presumably this area did contain the main apartments of the castle of high status. If there was ever a chapel on the site, it had gone out of use by the Civil War. The surviving wall footings suggest that in the late period at least, several of the buildings built against the curtain wall were timber-framed. There may have been two separate ways up from the bailey to the mound top. The main entrance appears to be to the south east. There is another possible path up from the bailey to the south west. This may have been a postern gate or a later feature. ->

Assessing the former buildings and other structures within the bailey is difficult. The baileys would have presumably housed the less high status buildings. Although the masonry evidence is limited there is enough to indicate that the west wall was built in 1 phase. This was probably in the first half of the 13th century and at the same time as the mound was raised or scarped. It is impossible to tell from these findings as to whether this phase of construction marked the building of a new castle or a rebuilding of an existing one on this site. Shrawardine castle almost certainly replaced the one at Little Shrawardine. Although there are only fragmentary traces of the castle above ground and due to the fact there has been little below ground disturbance, the whole site is archaeologically sensitive. The survival of features below ground level is thought to be high. Despite its relatively unimpressive appearance, the castle is potentially one of the most important archaeological sites in Shropshire. <33>

A watching brief at Castle Croft in 2004 observed probable medieval settlement remains demolished with the castle. <35>

Feasibility study conducted in 1987 on behalf of SCC into forming a picnic site on land near to Shrawardine castle mound. There was also potential for housing development on an existing farmyard at Home Hall [PRN 04645], Shrawardine. This report also set out the programme of work and restoration that would need to be carried out on existing aspects of the landscape, if the picnic area was created. <36>

Photographed during aerial survey in 2007. <37>-<40>

The castle was covered by the deskbased lidar survey carried out in March 2014 which added some potential additional features not mentioned above. Key amongst these is a stretch of bank heading north from the field corner east of the keep cSJ 4015 1539. Although this feature is marked on the OS 1st Edition mapping, the lidar evidence reveals that it is a substantial structure c8.5m in width and 0.5m high, very similar in fact to the defensive works forming part of the south-east bailey mentioned by source (6) above. The bank runs almost due north from the field corner curving slightly and fades out by cSJ 4013 1548 in the vicinity of the pond. It is picked up again just to the west of the pond and runs from SJ 4008 1548 - 4005 1542 just north of the motte itself. As such this fits well with the description in the HER of a possible larger outer bailey. There are, however, also faint traces of a bank in the fields to the west immediately south of the road running from c SJ 3913 1549 - 4006 1548. There are faint traces of other banks on a similar alignment so it is possible that this feature is part of ridge and furrow cultivation, but its dimensions are very close to those of the other banks already noted so it is possible that it may represent part of an even larger outer bailey. West of the motte a length of hollow way extends north-east from SJ 3997 1531 to the corner of the motte. Just north of the hollow way are a set of house platforms at SJ 3997 1535, which together with the hollow way make up the remains of the medieval settlement which existed close to the castle. <41>

Ground photographs of castle taken in June 2018. <42>

Photographed during aerial survey in 2018. <43>


<00> Shropshire County Council SMR, Site and Monuments Record (SMR) cards, SMR Card for PRN SA 00052 (Card index). SSA20722.


<01b> Eyton R W, 1887, The Castles of Shropshire, p30-31 (Article in serial). SSA242.


<01c> Auden J E, 1895, Article in the Transactions of the Shropshire Archaeological and Historical Society (Article in serial). SSA241.


<01a> Pevsner Nikolaus, 1958, Buildings of England (Shropshire), p247 (Monograph). SSA110.


<01> Ordnance Survey, 1961, Ordnance Survey Record Card SJ41NW5 (Card index). SSA248.


<02> Cambridge University Collection of Air Photos (CUCAP), 1966-Dec-20, CUCAP AQI70 (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA16023.


<03> Musson Chris R, 1983-Aug-03, CPAT 83/13/0031 to 0033 (3 photos) (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA16022.


<04> Musson Chris R, 1983-Aug-03, CPAT 83/C/0311 to 0314 (4 photos) (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA16024.


<05> Musson Chris R, 1983-Aug-03, CPAT 83/S/0043 (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA16025.


<06> Musson Chris R, 1986-Jan-03, CPAT 86/MB/0017 to 0020 (4 photos) (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA16026.


<07a> Anon, History of the Kings Work, p834 (TEXT). SSA240.


<07b> Renn D R/D F?, 1968, Norman Castles of Britain, p311 (Monograph). SSA244.


<07> Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission (HBMC), 1982, Scheduled Monument Report on SAM 11985 (Field Monument Warden Report). SSA256.


<08> Burrow Ian, 1976-Apr-24, Visit Notes, 24/04/1976 (Site visit report). SSA258.


<09> Hogg A H A & King D J C, 1967, Masonry Castles in Wales and the Marches, p122-123 (Article in serial). SSA243.


<10> Stackhouse-Acton F (Mrs), 1867, Garrisons of Shropshire 1642-48 (Monograph). SSA239.


<11> Watson Michael D, 1987, Plan of Earthworks (Measured survey drawing). SSA252.


<12> Tyler Alan W, 1978, Site Visit Form (Field recording form). SSA257.


<13> Ryan Carole or Watson Michael D, 1982, Photos of Shrawardine Castle (Photograph). SSA249.


<14> Ward Penny A, 1983-Jan/Feb, Shrawardine Castle (Photograph). SSA12768.


<15> Ryan Carole, 1983-Jan, Shrawardine Castle (Photograph). SSA12767.


<16> Ryan Carole, 1983, Slide (Photograph). SSA253.


<17> Dugharty J, 1728, Map of the Township of Shrawardine (Map). SSA245.


<18> Barret Gill, 1990, Barret Gill, Oblique View, 1990: 90/F/33 (Colour slide) (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA16027.


<19> Roberts M, 1990, Roberts M, Oblique View, 1990: 90/03BW/32 (Photographic medium) (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA16028.


<20> Anon, 1976/ 1983, Slides (Photograph). SSA254.


<21> Hannaford Hugh R, 1991, An archaeological evaluation at Shrawardine Farm, Shrawardine, Shropshire (Excavation report). SSA237.


<22> Thomas Harley O, 1992, Various Areas of Erosion (Photograph). SSA255.


<23> Haigh David H, 1992, Schedule of Repairs at Shrawardine Castle (Project specification). SSA235.


<24> Haigh David H, 1992, Correspondence, 28/09/1992 (Correspondence). SSA247.


<25> Hannaford Hugh R, 1992, Excavations at Shrawardine Castle (Excavation report). SSA238.


<26> Ryan Carole, 1983-Jan, Shrawardine Castle (Photograph). SSA250.


<27> Hannaford Hugh R & Phillpotts C J, 1994, An archaeological evaluation at Shrawardine Farm, Shrawardine (Excavation report). SSA236.


<28> Department of the Environment (DoE), 1987-Nov-27, 46th List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest, p128 (List of Buildings). SSA246.


<29> Horton Wendy B, 1990/ 1991, MPP Evaluation File (TEXT). SSA20084.


<30> English Heritage, 1997, Scheduling Papers (Affirmation, 04/03/1997) (Scheduled Monument notification). SSA251.


<31> Jones N W, 2002, Shrawardine Castle, Shropshire: Archaeological Survey (Field survey report). SSA20759.


<32> Roseveare M, 2002, Geophysical Survey at Shrawardine Castle, Shropshire (Geophysical survey report). SSA20760.


<32a> Jones N W, 2004, Archaeological surveys at Shrawardine Castle (Article in serial). SSA22180.


<33> Morriss Richard K, 1998, Shrawardine Castle, Shropshire: an outline analysis and survey (Field survey report). SSA21009.


<34> Thomas Harley O et al, 1992/ 1998, Correspondence relating to the production of a management plan for Shrawardine Castle (Correspondence). SSA21369.


<35> Frost Pat, 2004, Castle Croft, Shrawardine, Shropshire (Watching brief report). SSA22214.


<36> Anon, 1987, Shrawardine Castle (Motte and Bailey): a landscape and housing development proposal (Field survey report). SSA20944.


<37> Shropshire Council, 2007-Jul-31, SA0703_064 to SA0703_066 (3 photos) Flight: 07_SA_03 (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA25015.


<38> Shropshire Council, 2007-Sep-4, SA0707_078 (1 photo) Flight: 07_SA_07 (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA24887.


<39> Shropshire Council, 2007-Jul-24, SA0701_039 to SA0701_042 (4 photos) Flight: 07_SA_01 (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA24840.


<40> Shropshire Council, 2007-Aug-8, SA0706_079 (1 photo) Flight: 07_SA_06 (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA25256.


<41> National Monuments Record (NMR), Pastscape, SJ 41 NW 5 (Online database). SSA22230.


<42> Carey Giles, 2018-June, Photographs of Shrawardine Castle (Photograph). SSA30079.


<43> Shropshire Council, 2018-Jun-06, SA1801_010 to SA1801_021 (12 photos) Flight: 18_SA_01 (Oblique aerial photograph). SSA30094.

Sources

[00]SSA20722 - Card index: Shropshire County Council SMR. Site and Monuments Record (SMR) cards. SMR record cards. SMR Card for PRN SA 00052.
[01a]SSA110 - Monograph: Pevsner Nikolaus. 1958. Buildings of England (Shropshire). Buildings of England. p247.
[01c]SSA241 - Article in serial: Auden J E. 1895. Article in the Transactions of the Shropshire Archaeological and Historical Society. Trans Shropshire Archaeol Hist Soc. Ser 2, Vol VII (=Vol 18). p120-202.
[01b]SSA242 - Article in serial: Eyton R W. 1887. The Castles of Shropshire. Trans Shropshire Archaeol Hist Soc. Ser 1, Vol X (=Vol 10). p30-31.
[01]SSA248 - Card index: Ordnance Survey. 1961. Ordnance Survey Record Card SJ41NW5. Ordnance Survey record cards. SJ41NW5.
[02]SSA16023 - Oblique aerial photograph: Cambridge University Collection of Air Photos (CUCAP). 1966-Dec-20. CUCAP AQI70. Black and white.
[03]SSA16022 - Oblique aerial photograph: Musson Chris R. 1983-Aug-03. CPAT 83/13/0031 to 0033 (3 photos).
[04]SSA16024 - Oblique aerial photograph: Musson Chris R. 1983-Aug-03. CPAT 83/C/0311 to 0314 (4 photos). Colour. 35mm.
[05]SSA16025 - Oblique aerial photograph: Musson Chris R. 1983-Aug-03. CPAT 83/S/0043.
[06]SSA16026 - Oblique aerial photograph: Musson Chris R. 1986-Jan-03. CPAT 86/MB/0017 to 0020 (4 photos). Black and White. Medium.
[07a]SSA240 - TEXT: Anon. History of the Kings Work. p834.
[07b]SSA244 - Monograph: Renn D R/D F?. 1968. Norman Castles of Britain. p311.
[07]SSA256 - Field Monument Warden Report: Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission (HBMC). 1982. Scheduled Monument Report on SAM 11985.
[08]SSA258 - Site visit report: Burrow Ian. 1976-Apr-24. Visit Notes, 24/04/1976.
[09]SSA243 - Article in serial: Hogg A H A & King D J C. 1967. Masonry Castles in Wales and the Marches. Archaeologia Cambrensis. Vol 116. pp.71-132. p122-123.
[10]SSA239 - Monograph: Stackhouse-Acton F (Mrs). 1867. Garrisons of Shropshire 1642-48.
[11]SSA252 - Measured survey drawing: Watson Michael D. 1987. Plan of Earthworks. 1:500.
[12]SSA257 - Field recording form: Tyler Alan W. 1978. Site Visit Form. SMR site visit form.
[13]SSA249 - Photograph: Ryan Carole or Watson Michael D. 1982. Photos of Shrawardine Castle. Black and white. 35mm.
[14]SSA12768 - Photograph: Ward Penny A. 1983-Jan/Feb. Shrawardine Castle. Black and white. 35mm.
[15]SSA12767 - Photograph: Ryan Carole. 1983-Jan. Shrawardine Castle. Black and white. 35mm.
[16]SSA253 - Photograph: Ryan Carole. 1983. Slide. Colour.
[17]SSA245 - Map: Dugharty J. 1728. Map of the Township of Shrawardine.
[18]SSA16027 - Oblique aerial photograph: Barret Gill. 1990. Barret Gill, Oblique View, 1990: 90/F/33 (Colour slide). Colour.
[19]SSA16028 - Oblique aerial photograph: Roberts M. 1990. Roberts M, Oblique View, 1990: 90/03BW/32 (Photographic medium).
[20]SSA254 - Photograph: Anon. 1976/ 1983. Slides. Colour.
[21]SSA237 - Excavation report: Hannaford Hugh R. 1991. An archaeological evaluation at Shrawardine Farm, Shrawardine, Shropshire. SCCAS Rep. 7.
[22]SSA255 - Photograph: Thomas Harley O. 1992. Various Areas of Erosion. Colour.
[23]SSA235 - Project specification: Haigh David H. 1992. Schedule of Repairs at Shrawardine Castle.
[24]SSA247 - Correspondence: Haigh David H. 1992. Correspondence, 28/09/1992. Tenant farmer.
[25]SSA238 - Excavation report: Hannaford Hugh R. 1992. Excavations at Shrawardine Castle. SCCAS Rep. 20.
[26]SSA250 - Photograph: Ryan Carole. 1983-Jan. Shrawardine Castle. Black and white. 35mm.
[27]SSA236 - Excavation report: Hannaford Hugh R & Phillpotts C J. 1994. An archaeological evaluation at Shrawardine Farm, Shrawardine. SCCAS Rep. 45.
[28]SSA246 - List of Buildings: Department of the Environment (DoE). 1987-Nov-27. 46th List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Vol 1584-0. List volume. p128.
[29]SSA20084 - TEXT: Horton Wendy B. 1990/ 1991. MPP Evaluation File.
[30]SSA251 - Scheduled Monument notification: English Heritage. 1997. Scheduling Papers (Affirmation, 04/03/1997). 19209.
[31]SSA20759 - Field survey report: Jones N W. 2002. Shrawardine Castle, Shropshire: Archaeological Survey. CPAT Rep. 436.
[32]SSA20760 - Geophysical survey report: Roseveare M. 2002. Geophysical Survey at Shrawardine Castle, Shropshire. Archaeophysica Rep.
[32a]SSA22180 - Article in serial: Jones N W. 2004. Archaeological surveys at Shrawardine Castle. Trans Shropshire Archaeol Hist Soc. 77 (2002). pp.15-25.
[33]SSA21009 - Field survey report: Morriss Richard K. 1998. Shrawardine Castle, Shropshire: an outline analysis and survey. Mercian Heritage Series. 59.
[34]SSA21369 - Correspondence: Thomas Harley O et al. 1992/ 1998. Correspondence relating to the production of a management plan for Shrawardine Castle.
[35]SSA22214 - Watching brief report: Frost Pat. 2004. Castle Croft, Shrawardine, Shropshire. Castlering Archaeol Rep. 189.
[36]SSA20944 - Field survey report: Anon. 1987. Shrawardine Castle (Motte and Bailey): a landscape and housing development proposal.
[37]SSA25015 - Oblique aerial photograph: Shropshire Council. 2007-Jul-31. SA0703_064 to SA0703_066 (3 photos) Flight: 07_SA_03. Colour. Digital.
[38]SSA24887 - Oblique aerial photograph: Shropshire Council. 2007-Sep-4. SA0707_078 (1 photo) Flight: 07_SA_07. Colour. Digital.
[39]SSA24840 - Oblique aerial photograph: Shropshire Council. 2007-Jul-24. SA0701_039 to SA0701_042 (4 photos) Flight: 07_SA_01. Colour. Digital.
[40]SSA25256 - Oblique aerial photograph: Shropshire Council. 2007-Aug-8. SA0706_079 (1 photo) Flight: 07_SA_06. Colour. Digital.
[41]SSA22230 - Online database: National Monuments Record (NMR). Pastscape. SJ 41 NW 5.
[42]SSA30079 - Photograph: Carey Giles. 2018-June. Photographs of Shrawardine Castle. Colour. Digital.
[43]SSA30094 - Oblique aerial photograph: Shropshire Council. 2018-Jun-06. SA1801_010 to SA1801_021 (12 photos) Flight: 18_SA_01. Colour. Digital.
Date Last Edited:Jun 27 2018 2:26PM