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Historic England Research Records

Hunmanby Castle

Hob Uid: 1024351
Location :
North Yorkshire
Scarborough
Hunmanby
Grid Ref : TA0944077500
Summary : The site of Hunmanby Castle motte and bailey. The castle was built by Guilbert de Gant (1048-1095) in the 11th century and destroyed in the period, known as The Anarchy, during the reign of King Stephen (1135-1154). All that survives of the castle are earthwork remains. In the 14th century, the site of the earlier motte was referred to as 'Castlegarth', while a field containing the bailey is called 'Erlesing'. The site of the castle, together with a large area of land to the west of the village of Hunmanby, was emparked in the 18th century. The motte occupied the highest point on Castle Hill which provided an easily defended site requiring little modification. The western edge of the motte is defined by a ditch, 10m wide and 3m deep. The ditch once surrounded the motte but has been infilled to the south and east. To the north the motte is bounded by the steep scarp of the road embankment. The motte is estimated to be 60m in diameter and the top is about 4m above the surrounding land surface. Historical and aerial photographic research has identified the original extent of the bailey and, although the southern part has been altered by terracing associated with modern buildings, the northern area remains undeveloped. This part measures 220m east-west by 100m north-south and is estimated to be one quarter of the original area of the bailey. The northern edge of the bailey is defined by the modern road, Castle Hill or Ratten Row, which runs in a 5m deep cutting down into the town centre.
More information : TA 0945 7750. Castle Hill [NAT] (1)

TA 0944 7750. Hunmanby Castle motte and bailey. Scheduled RSM No20531. The motte and undeveloped part of the bailey of the Norman castle at Hunmanby. The village of Hunmanby lies on the western scarp of the Wolds and the castle is situated on Castle Hill, a slight promontory overlooking the village, 100m west of the 11th century All Saints' Church. The monument also lies in the grounds of Hunmanby Hall, a 17th century house later converted into a school for girls and subsequently extended by major new buildingin the early 1900s.

The motte occupies the highest point on Castle Hill, a natural knoll which provided an easily defended site requiring little modification. A ditch, 10m wide and 3m deep, defines the western edge of the motte, providing an additional fortification against attack from the high ground to the west. The ditch once surrounded the motte but has been infilled to the south and east. To the north the motte is bounded by the steep scarp of the road embankment. The motte is estimated to be 60m in diameter and the top is about 4m above the surrounding land surface. A recent study of historical documents and aerial photographic records has identified the original extent of the bailey and, although the southern part has been altered by terracing associated with modern buildings, the northern portion remains undeveloped. This portion, estimated to be one quarter of the original area of the bailey, measures 220m east-west by 100m north-south. The northern edge of the bailey is defined by the modern road, Castle Hill or Ratten Row, which runs in a 5m deep cutting down into the town centre.

Hunmanby Castle was built by Guilbert de Gant. In the 14th century, the site of the motte is referred to as 'Castlegarth', while a field containing the bailey is called 'Erlesing'. The castle, together
with a large area of land to the west of the village, was emparked
in the 18th century. (2)

Scheduled. For the designated record please see The National Heritage List for England. (3)

The castle was constructed in the 11thC by Giselbert de Gaunt (aka Gilbert de Gant), but destroyed during the Anarchy in the 12th C. (4)

During the period 1143 -1144 William le Gros began a campaign against Gilbert de Gant, culminating in the Battle of Hunmanby. Gilbert was defeated and Hunmanby Castle was destroyed. (5)


Sources :
Source Number : 1
Source : Ordnance Survey Map (Scale / Date)
Source details : OS 1:10000 1986
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Source Number : 2
Source : Scheduled Monument Notification
Source details : English Heritage Scheduling Amendment 7/12/93
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Source Number : 3
Source : World Wide Web page
Source details : English Heritage. 2012. The National Heritage List for England,
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Source Number : 4
Source : Oral information, correspondence (not archived) or staff comments
Source details : PastScape feedback, 18-DEC-2011
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Source Number : 5
Source : World Wide Web page
Source details : Hunmanbydotcom. 2011. The Battle of Hunmanby, [Accessed 04-JAN-2012]
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External Cross Reference Source : Scheduled Monument Legacy (National No.)
External Cross Reference Number : 20531
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : SMR Number (North Yorkshire)
External Cross Reference Number : MNY7579
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External Cross Reference Source : National Monuments Record Number
External Cross Reference Number : TA 07 NE 29
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Related Warden Records :
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