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Historic England Research Records

St Saviours Union Infirmary

Hob Uid: 1455094
Location :
Greater London Authority
Southwark
Non Civil Parish
Grid Ref : TQ3341175098
Summary : St Saviour's Union Infirmary was built between 1885 and 1887 to ease pressure from overcrowding at the St Saviour's Union Workhouse. The architect was Henry Jarvis and the builders were Kirk and Randall. It consisted of a central administration and resident staff section, flanked on either side by two three storey, turreted blocks of Nightingale wards, connected by a three-storey corridor. There was a large chapel over the main entrance. The buildings were built of red brick with dressings of Ancaster stone in a neo-Flemish style. The original freeholder stipulated that the infirmary should be designed 'with a view to producing a pleasing effect'. They were therefore designed with a high degree of architectural character unusual for this form of institution. Attractive details included the slim, spiky gables above the tall chapel windows, the elaborate strapwork in the Dutch gables of the flanking staff houses, and the ogee domed caps to the sanitary towers of the ward blocks.During the First World War, the infirmary became Southwark Military Hospital. By 1926, the site was known as Southwark Board of Guardians' Hospital. In 1930, it was transferred to the London County Council and several additions were built including a new operating theatre, pharmacy, boiler house and chimney. In 1948, it was transferred to the National Health Service and there were several more alterations and additions. By 1992, the site was known as Dulwich Hospital South Wing, to differentiate it from the old workhouse site on the other side of the railway line (now demolished). It was still extant in 2007 and is now known as Dulwich Hospital.
More information : St Saviour's Union Infirmary was built between 1885 and 1887 to ease pressure from overcrowding at the St Saviour's Union Workhouse. The architect was Henry Jarvis and the builders were Kirk and Randall. It consisted of a central administration and resident staff section, flanked on either side by two three storey, turreted blocks of Nightingale wards, connected by a three-storey corridor. There was a large chapel over the main entrance. The buildings were built of red brick with dressings of Ancaster stone in a neo-Flemish style. The original freeholder stipulated that the infirmary should be designed 'with a view to producing a pleasing effect'. They were therefore designed with a high degree of architectural character unusual for this form of institution. Attractive details included the slim, spiky gables above the tall chapel windows, the elaborate strapwork in the Dutch gables of the flanking staff houses, and the ogee domed caps to the sanitary towers of the ward blocks.

During the First World War, the infirmary became Southwark Military Hospital. By 1926, the site was known as Southwark Board of Guardians' Hospital. In 1930, it was transferred to the London County Council and several additions were built including a new operating theatre, pharmacy, boiler house and chimney. In 1948, it was transferred to the National Health Service and there were several more alterations and additions. By 1992, the site was known as Dulwich Hospital South Wing, to differentiate it from the old workhouse site on the other side of the railway line (now demolished). It was still extant in 2007 and is now known as Dulwich Hospital. [1-3]

Sources :
Source Number : 1
Source : Oral information, correspondence (not archived) or staff comments
Source details : Uncatalogued NMR Archive File - Workhouses 101154
Page(s) :
Figs. :
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Vol(s) :
Source Number : 2
Source : World Wide Web page
Source details : Higginbotham, Peter. 2006. The Workhouse. [Accessed 14-MAY-2007]
Page(s) :
Figs. :
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Source Number : 3
Source : The Workhouse: a study of Poor Law Buildings in England
Source details :
Page(s) : 217
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) :

Monument Types:
Monument Period Name : Victorian
Display Date : Built 1885-1887
Monument End Date : 1887
Monument Start Date : 1885
Monument Type : Infirmary, Ward Block, Chapel, House, Office, Porters Lodge, Kitchen, Storehouse, Dispensary, Boiler House, Laundry, Wash House, Operating Theatre
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Early 20th Century
Display Date : 1930 Additions
Monument End Date : 1930
Monument Start Date : 1930
Monument Type : Hospital, Ward Block, Chapel, Office, Kitchen, Storehouse, Boiler House, Laundry, Porters Lodge, Operating Theatre, Pharmacy, Chimney
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : First World War
Display Date : Change of use during WWI
Monument End Date : 1918
Monument Start Date : 1914
Monument Type : Military Hospital, Ward Block, Chapel, House, Office, Porters Lodge, Kitchen, Storehouse, Laundry, Wash House
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Mid 20th Century
Display Date : Additions made after 1948
Monument End Date :
Monument Start Date : 1948
Monument Type : Hospital, Ward Block, Casualty Department, Outpatients Department, Radiography Department, Physiotherapy Department, Antenatal Block, Office, Kitchen
Evidence : Extant Building

Components and Objects:
Related Records from other datasets:
External Cross Reference Source : NBR Index Number
External Cross Reference Number : 101154
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : National Monuments Record Number
External Cross Reference Number : TQ 37 NW 360
External Cross Reference Notes :

Related Warden Records :
Associated Monuments : 1454968
Relationship type : General association

Related Activities :
Associated Activities : Primary, RCHME: WORKHOUSES PROJECT
Activity type : ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY
Start Date : 1991-01-01
End Date : 1994-12-31
Associated Activities : Primary, INVESTIGATION BY RCHME/EH ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY
Activity type : ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY
Start Date : 1995-11-14
End Date : 1995-11-14