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Historic England Research Records

Teapot Hall

Hob Uid: 1489449
Location :
Lincolnshire
East Lindsey
Roughton
Grid Ref : TF2526666529
Summary : It is believed Tea Pot Hall was constructed in the 19th century. It was certainly in existence by 1888 as it features on historic mapping and stood on the northeast side of the junctions of the road running west out of Scrivelsby and the road running north out of Dalderby. It was constructed around a very simple 5-post cruck frame with a thatched roof covering around two-thirds of its area with the lower portions clad in large tiles, possibly of slate. The building appears to have been rendered but the precise material is unknown. Its shape and similarity to simple Medieval cruck buildings led to early assumptions that it dated to this period. A small window above the front door indicates a second floor, and a small tiled roof extension may have been a later addition. The building burned down in 1945 and the area is now covered in trees.
More information : Teapot Hall is believed to have been constructed in the 19th century. It was certainly in existence by 1888 as it features on historic mapping as 'Tea Pot Lodge' and stood on the northeast side of the junctions of the road running west out of Scrivelsby and the road running north out of Dalderby. The 1901 census shows the use of the name 'Tea Pot Cottage'.

It was constructed around a very simple 5-post cruck frame and apparently inspired the rhyme 'Tea Pot Hall, all roof, no wall' on account of the shape this gave. Its similarity in shape to simple Medieval cruck buildings led to early assumptions that it dated to this period. It had a thatched roof covering around two-thirds of its area with the lower portions clad in large tiles, possibly of slate. To one side was a small 4-light window through the slate and thatch and to the other an external chimney breast. The front had the door and one small window above, indicative of a second floor. Behind this chimney breast was a simple square extension with tiled roof which is presumably a later addition although this cannot be proven either way. Behind the building was a small cylindrical thatched building of unknown use.

In antiquity the road the Hall stood on appears to have petered out into a track which led, eventually via a track, to Scrivelsby Court. In one picture of the Hall there is a large gate blocking the entrance to the road and it may be that the building was constructed for someone working on the estate. This is a highly conjectural interpretation, however. The building was burned down in 1945 possibly during celebrations on VJ day. The plot is now covered in trees. (1-2)

For photographic information only (3)

Sources :
Source Number : 1
Source : England's Landscape: The East Midlands
Source details :
Page(s) : 151
Figs. : 4.41
Plates :
Vol(s) :
Source Number : 2
Source : The Development of the Cruck Framwork
Source details :
Page(s) : 179-189
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) : 22
Source Number : 3
Source : World Wide Web page
Source details : Photographic material: NR Clark, 'Tea Pot Hall', Available from: http://nrsclark.com/FT/Teapot%20Hall.htm Accessed: 28-JAN-2009
Page(s) :
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) :

Monument Types:
Monument Period Name : Post Medieval
Display Date : Built C19 before 1888
Monument End Date : 1888
Monument Start Date : 1801
Monument Type : Cruck House, Timber Framed House
Evidence : Documentary Evidence
Monument Period Name : Mid 20th Century
Display Date : Destroyed 1945
Monument End Date : 1945
Monument Start Date : 1945
Monument Type : Cruck House, Timber Framed House
Evidence : Documentary Evidence

Components and Objects:
Related Records from other datasets:
External Cross Reference Source : National Monuments Record Number
External Cross Reference Number : TF 26 NE 75
External Cross Reference Notes :

Related Warden Records :
Related Activities :