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Historic England Research Records

Aubrey House

Hob Uid: 1513936
Location :
Greater London Authority
Kensington And Chelsea
Grid Ref : TQ2484980083
Summary : Aubrey House is located near Holland Park in London. It is thought to have a core dating to 1698 which was remodelled by Sir Edward Lloyd between 1745 and 1754, though work possibly began as early as 1730. Further alterations were carried out in the late 18th century. Built from brick, this house is three storeys high with a five window centre and two storey, three window wings and modern additions to the east. The centre has a dentilled brick cornice and parapet, and a dentilled brick pediment over the three window central part which breaks forward slightly. There is a band between the ground and first floors. The doorcase has a dentilled pediment and entablature above Tuscan pilasters. The east wing projects slightly and has a band across the front continuing that of the main block. In the 19th century the west wing was enlarged and altered and a Tuscan loggia was built on the garden front.The home of Mentia and Peter Taylor from 1860 until 1873, it became a gathering place for those involved in the radical social and political movements of the day. Peter Taylor was MP for Leicester between 1862 and 1884, and Mentia was actively involved in promoting the cause of women's suffrage. In 1863 she became honorary secretary of the Ladies' London Emancipation Society and it was at her home in 1866 that 1499 signatures were collated from a women's suffrage petition. She briefly served as treasurer initially to the London Provincial Petition Committee and then Committee for the Enfranchisement of Women before withdrawing from the latter to establish the London National Society for Women's Suffrage. Their first meeting was held at Aubrey House on 5 July 1867 and her home also became the official address for the Society. In 1871 Mentia withdrew from the executive committee but remained an active member until 1874.
More information : Aubrey House, located near Holland Park in London, was built circa 1730-1740. Built from brick, it is three storeys high with a five window centre and two storey, three window wings and modern additions to the east. The centre has a dentilled brick cornice and parapet and a dentilled brick pediment over the three window central part which breaks forward slightly. There is a band between the ground and first floors. The doorcase has a dentilled pediment and entablature above Tuscan pilasters. The east wing projects slightly and has a band across the front continuing that of the main block. The west wing has been enlarged and altered in 19th century. The rear elevation facing the garden shows the same three storey centre with the top floor in the parapet and a brick cornice below. The central one-window part projects slightly. The wings on this side are in line with the main block. The windows on the first floor retain their original cased frames. On the garden front to the extreme east beyond the modern additions is a 19th century Tuscan loggia. (1)


Aubrey House was the home of Clementia (known as Mentia) and Peter Taylor from 1860 until 1873. It became a gathering place for those involved in the radical social and political movements of the day. Peter Taylor was MP for Leicester between 1862 and 1884, and Mentia was actively involved in promoting the cause of women's suffrage. In 1863 she became honorary secretary of the Ladies' London Emancipation Society and it was at her home in 1866 that 1499 signatures were collated from a women's suffrage petition. In that same year she was treasurer to the London Provincial Petition Committee for brief period and thereafter became treasurer to the Committee for the Enfranchisement of Women. Believing it to be too conservative in its approach, Mentia withdrew from the Committee for the Enfranchisement of Women and was instrumental in establishing the London National Society for Women's Suffrage (LNSWS), of which she was treasurer. She felt that only a national strategy could be the most effective means for making progress. On 5 July 1867 the first meeting of the LNSWS was held at Aubrey House, which also became the official address for the Society. In 1871 Mentia withdrew from the executive committee but remained an active member until 1874.

With its establishment, the LNSWS joined the Manchester National Society for Women's Suffrage (MNSWS) with the intention of creating a federation of suffrage societies. Unlike the Manchester Society however, the LNSWS never operated from a formal office but instead gathered at the homes of its members and gave its official address as that of the secretary in post at the time.

The LNSWS promoted the cause for women's suffrage through the production and circulation of a range of pamphlets and publications and membership was open to all, including working men and women. The LNSWS split in 1871 with some members leaving to the form the Central Committee of the National Society for Women's Suffrage (CCNSWS). The reasons for the split were due to the objections of some LNSWS members to the MNSWS's intentions of forming a London-based committee of provincial members and also to the involvement of some MNSWS members in working for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Act. In 1877 the LNSWS and CCNSWS merged, under the name of the latter society. By this time those most in opposition to the ideas of the CCNSWS were no longer active. (2)


According to Pevsner and Cherry, the core of Aubrey House possibly dates to circa 1698 but it was remodelled between 1745 and 1754 by Sir Edward Lloyd. He was responsible for adding the projecting wings to the central block and reconstructing the northern façade. In the late 18th century further alterations included the creation of a drawing room and the addition of external features such as the gauged-arched windows and pediment with urns. (3)

Sources :
Source Number : 1
Source : List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest
Source details : Kensington and Chelsea Borough, 29-JUL-1949
Page(s) :
Figs. :
Plates :
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Source Number : 2
Source : The Women's Suffrage Movement A Reference Guide 1866-1928
Source details :
Page(s) : 673-677
Figs. :
Plates :
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Source Number : 3
Source : London, 3 : north west
Source details :
Page(s) : 508-9
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Monument Types:
Monument Period Name : Post Medieval
Display Date : 19th century alterations
Monument End Date : 1900
Monument Start Date : 1801
Monument Type : Country House, Loggia
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Stuart
Display Date : Possibly built c1698
Monument End Date : 1708
Monument Start Date : 1688
Monument Type : House
Evidence : Documentary Evidence
Monument Period Name : Georgian
Display Date : Remodelled 1745-54; possibly from 1730
Monument End Date : 1754
Monument Start Date : 1730
Monument Type : Country House
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Georgian
Display Date : Altered late 18th century
Monument End Date : 1800
Monument Start Date : 1767
Monument Type : Country House
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Victorian
Display Date : LNSWS office 1867-71
Monument End Date : 1871
Monument Start Date : 1867
Monument Type : Office
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : 20th Century
Display Date : Modern additions, possibly pre-1949
Monument End Date : 1949
Monument Start Date : 1901
Monument Type : House
Evidence : Extant Building

Components and Objects:
Related Records from other datasets:
External Cross Reference Source : Listed Building List Entry Legacy Uid
External Cross Reference Number : 203515
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : National Monuments Record Number
External Cross Reference Number : TQ 28 SW 130
External Cross Reference Notes :

Related Warden Records :
Related Activities :