HeritageGateway - Home
Site Map
Text size: A A A
You are here: Home > > > > Historic England research records Result
Historic England research recordsPrintable version | About Historic England research records

Historic England Research Records

Braidwood Academy For The Deaf And Dumb

Hob Uid: 1552878
Location :
Greater London Authority
Hackney
Non Civil Parish
Grid Ref : TQ3524684803
Summary : The former Braidwood Academy for the Deaf and Dumb was founded by Thomas Braidwood in the late 18th century. He first established the Academy in Bowling Green House in Hackney, London. The name of the house was changed to Grove House and again in 1799 to Pembroke House. The former Academy was continued after Braidwood's death in 1806 by his family until c.1810. The building that housed the Academy no longer exists but was roughly located in present day No.36 Chatham Place, Hackney, London. Thomas Braidwood (1715-1806) opened the first deaf school in Britain in Edinburgh which in 1760 had one deaf pupil. Braidwood's success in developing teaching methods for deaf children led to the numbers increasing to 20 pupils by 1780. His approach was to use natural gestures rather than the oralism used elsewhere in Europe. The Braidwood's represented deaf education for nearly half a century, however the school in Edinburgh closed and Braidwood then moved to London and established The Braidwood Academy for the Deaf and Dumb in Hackney.
More information : The Braidwood Academy for the Deaf and Dumb was founded by Thomas Braidwood in the late 18th century. He moved the Academy from Edinburgh to Bowling Green House, Hackney, London in 1783. The name of the house was changed to Grove House. He moved again in 1799 to Pembroke House. The former Academy was continued after Braidwood’s death in 1806 by his family until c.1810. The building that housed the Academy no longer exists but was roughly located in present day No.36 Chatham Place, Hackney, London. (1)

Thomas Braidwood (1715-1806) opened the first deaf school in Britain in Edinburgh which in 1760 had one deaf pupil. Braidwood’s success in developing teaching methods for deaf children led to the numbers increasing to 20 pupils by 1780. His approach was to use natural gestures rather than the oralism used elsewhere in Europe. The Braidwood’s represented deaf education for nearly half a century, however the school in Edinburgh closed and Braidwood then moved to London and established The Braidwood Academy for the Deaf and Dumb in Hackney. (2)

The National Grid Reference for the area in which the former building was roughly located is: TQ3524684803 (3)

Sources :
Source Number : 1
Source : World Wide Web page
Source details : British History, 2012, [Accessed 12-APR-2012]
Page(s) :
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) :
Source Number : 2
Source : World Wide Web page
Source details : Bristol University, [Accessed 12-APR-2012]
Page(s) :
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) :
Source Number : 3
Source : Ordnance Survey Map (Scale / Date)
Source details : 1:1250, 2008
Page(s) :
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) :

Monument Types:
Monument Period Name : Georgian
Display Date : Founded Late 18th Century
Monument End Date : 1799
Monument Start Date : 1750
Monument Type : Institute For The Deaf
Evidence : Documentary Evidence

Components and Objects:
Related Records from other datasets:
External Cross Reference Source : National Monuments Record Number
External Cross Reference Number : TQ 38 SE 333
External Cross Reference Notes :

Related Warden Records :
Related Activities :
Associated Activities : Primary, ENGLISH HERITAGE: DISABILITY IN TIME AND PLACE
Activity type : MEASURED SURVEY
Start Date : 2011-01-01
End Date : 2012-12-31