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Historic England Research Records

Havering Palace

Hob Uid: 411647
Location :
Greater London Authority
Havering
Non Civil Parish
Grid Ref : TQ5107993029
Summary : Former site of the palace or manor, which was of Late Saxon origin. It was a retreat of Edward the Confessor, then a hunting seat. In the Tudor period, it was seized by Henry VII from the Widow of Edward IV. Henry VIII gave the palace to the first three of his wives: Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn and Jane Seymour. It was abandoned in 1620, and was described as ruinous during the Commonwealth. It was a favourite residence of the royal consorts, the Queen's residence being known as the Bower. No trace now remains and the plan of the palace is only known from documentary sources.
More information : [TQ 51079301]. Site of HAVERING PALACE [LB]. (1)

The Manor, Palace, or Bower of Havering was of Saxon origin, and was a retreat of Edward the Confessor. In later times it was a hunting seat. The palace fell in disrepair in Tudor times, was visited by Charles I in 1637, but in the Commonwealth was described as ruinous. No trace now remains. An attached chapel of St.John the Evangelist continued in use, but has now been replaced by a modern church. (2)

(TQ 511930) The palace plan is only known from documentary evidence, the reconstructed layout covering an area approximately 100m square. The proposed reconstruction places the main block, originating in the Medieval period, north and north-west of the present church. The kitchen court, the kitchen and the stabling block, of Elizabethan date, lay on the western edge near the present Bower Hall and The Courts TQ 51139310. The parish church overlies the larger of the two chapels, the church rebuilt twice before the end of the C19. The palace was a major Mediaeval residence throughout the Mediaeval period. Apart from the King's chambers, there were at least 2 chapels. (3-8).

A print of 1818 shows a stone nave with prominent buttresses at the SE and NE corners and a timber tower on th west. Part of the palace was then recorded as surviving beneath the tower (4).

After Elizabeth Is death, James I used Havering Palace as a hunting lodge, only occassionally using it for state functions. In 1650 it was described as fit for demolition. However the estate was leased to the Earl of Lindsey, and survived into the 18th century. By 1878 only the chapel remained, then in use as the parish church, but that was replaced by the present church in 1878-9. (9)

Havering became a Tudor royal palace having been siezed by Henry VII from the Widow of Edward IV. Henry VIII gave the palace to the first three of his wives: Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn and Jane Seymour, but not to Anne of Cleves or subsequent queens. The source notes the subsequent use of the house by other monarchs and its decline by 1650. (10)

Sources :
Source Number : 1
Source : Ordnance Survey Map (Scale / Date)
Source details : OS 6" 1961.
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Source Number : 2
Source : Some famous buildings and their story : being the results of recent research in London and elsewhere
Source details :
Page(s) : 145-50
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Source Number : 3
Source : Essex journal: a review of archaeology and local history
Source details : G Caunt 5 1 1970
Page(s) : 44-48
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Source Number : 4
Source : Essex journal: a review of archaeology and local history
Source details : Matthews, Madell & Rowland 19 3 1984
Page(s) : 65-68
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Source Number : 5
Source : Essex journal: a review of archaeology and local history
Source details :
Page(s) : 27-29
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Vol(s) : 21, 1986
Source Number : 6
Source : The history of the King's Works, volume 1 : the Middle Ages
Source details :
Page(s) : 150-2
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Source Number : 7
Source : The Victoria history of the counties of England
Source details : Essex Vol 7 1968
Page(s) : 22-23
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Vol(s) : 7
Source Number : 8
Source : VIRTUAL CATALOGUE ENTRY TO SUPPORT NAR MIGRATION
Source details : Terry, G Ed 1969: Memories of Old Romford
Page(s) : 69-70
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Source Number : 9
Source : The history of the King's Works, volume 2 : the Middle Ages
Source details :
Page(s) : 956-59
Figs. : 15
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Source Number : 10
Source : The history of the King's Works, volume 3 : 1485-1660 (part 1)
Source details :
Page(s) : 150
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Monument Types:
Monument Period Name : Early Medieval
Display Date : Late Saxon origins
Monument End Date : 1066
Monument Start Date : 871
Monument Type : Royal Palace, Hunting Lodge, Royal Chapel
Evidence : Documentary Evidence
Monument Period Name : Medieval
Display Date : Medieval
Monument End Date : 1540
Monument Start Date : 1066
Monument Type : Royal Palace, Hunting Lodge, Royal Chapel
Evidence : Documentary Evidence
Monument Period Name : Post Medieval
Display Date : Abandoned in 1620
Monument End Date : 1620
Monument Start Date : 1620
Monument Type : Hunting Lodge, Royal Palace, Royal Chapel
Evidence : Documentary Evidence
Monument Period Name : Post Medieval
Display Date : Demolished by 1878
Monument End Date : 1878
Monument Start Date : 1878
Monument Type : Chapel
Evidence : Documentary Evidence

Components and Objects:
Related Records from other datasets:
External Cross Reference Source : National Monuments Record Number
External Cross Reference Number : TQ 59 SW 1
External Cross Reference Notes :

Related Warden Records :
Associated Monuments : 411648
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Related Activities :