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Historic England Research Records

Monument Number 445589

Hob Uid: 445589
Location :
Devon
Teignbridge
Lustleigh
Grid Ref : SX7616082410
Summary : Earthwork remains of an Iron Age hillfort on Hunter's Tor.
More information : SX 761824 Camp (NR). (1)

Iron Age hill-fort at Hunters' Tor: "Three concentric enclosures, defences stone built and partly robbed for field walls. Inner entrance knobbed with embanked approach-road across second enclosure. Hill-top site." (2)

"Within the central area, at the south-east are the foundations
of three hut circles". (3)

A typical concentric enclosure hill-fort of south-western Iron Age `B' type. The ramparts have been obscured on the NE side by ploughing and the construction of a field wall. None of the three hut circles within the central enclosure could be found due to vegetation and boulders. (4)

Triple-ramparted hillfort of stone with shallow ditches, widely spaced with level berms 12m-15.5m wide between each rampart in the ttradition of SW England. Entrance is from the SE with the end of the middle rampart inturned to form an embanked entranceway which joins the innermost rampart. Entrance through the outer rampart and ditch via a causeway. The outer rampart and ditch are obscured on the slopes to the north and west. condition good despite the removal of much stone for field walls by farmers.

Surveyed at 1:500. (5)

'Unfinished' (6)

The earthworks are situated near the summit of Hunter's Tor at the northern end of the ridge of Lustleigh Cleave at around 324m OD and are centred at SX 7615 8240. The granite tor, from which the site takes its name, is to the north east of the earthworks and beyond this the hill slopes fairly steeply down to Peck Farm. To the south west of the tor the hill is at its steepest, where it falls away into the valley formed by the River Bovey. This situation gives the site wide-ranging views to the north and west. South of the tor the land slopes more gently and evidence of cultivation is clear.

The outer rampart, consisting of a bank and a ditch, although no longer forming a complete circuit, is perhaps the most imposing. To the north of the entrance the bank reaches a height of 2m from the bottom of the ditch and elsewhere, is up to 1.8m high. As would be expected, the earthworks on either side of the entrance are the strongest. The banks widen to form two club-ended terminals creating platforms over 3m wide on either side of the entrance. To the south, an external, 4m-wide ditch is preserved which ends in a rounded terminal, creating a 7m-wide causeway between it and the terminal of the ditch to the north of the entrance. This northern section of the ditch has become obscured by a relatively modern wall. The entranceway between the two banks is narrower, around 3m wide. Inside the outer rampart entrance, running parallel on either side of the walkway are two wide banks set back from the terminals around 1m in height which leave a 14m-wide area between them.
The rampart extending to the north from the entrance continues as a strong scarp until petering out at the most northerly point of the hillfort. A shallow plough scarp adjacent to the foot of the rampart marks the limit of more recent agricultural use of the field to the east. Any trace of a ditch along this section would have been effaced by medieval and post-medieval ploughing. What is likely to be another section of the outer rampart is a 62m-long scarp on the west side of the monument. A maximum of 1.8m high, this is of markedly different appearance to the scarps north and south of it and to which it is adjoined, but similar in dimensions and construction to other parts of the outer rampart to the north and south. If the rampart had originally formed a complete circuit, which included this section of bank, then the area enclosed would have been 1.7ha.

The inner rampart encloses an area of 0.6ha and has a maximum diameter of 96m. It consists for the most part of a moderate scarp of 4m wide on average. Although uneven, the enclosed area is relatively flat and clear of stones. To the south of the inner entrance there is evidence of both an inner and outer ditch although both fade abruptly before the scarp turns and heads northwards. There are however linear and circular mounds of material up to 14m long by 3m wide following the outside of the scarp on the western and northern arc of the circuit, representing vestiges of a bank.

The central rampart sits at odds with the other two enclosures; although between them, it is not concentric and it is constructed using a different style and materials. The most obvious difference is in the percentage and size of the stones used, especially in the construction of its elaborate entrance and at section to the north west. In these areas there are double rows of parallel, edge-set stones running along the top of the scarp, which probably formed facings.
The banks that form the two sides of the entrance of the central rampart turn inwards and project approximately 24m beyond the backs of the ramparts at right angles. This has left a corridor of between 3 and 5m in width although erosion is likely to have narrowed this over time.
Immediately to the south of the entrance on the outer face of the scarp are two depressions cut into the rampart . They are both approximately 7m in diameter and are irregular in shape. These may be the hut circles referred to by VCH although they are more likely to be quarrying pits from where stone has been robbed as the internal surfaces are concave and uneven.
A modern dry-stone wall runs along the top of the central rampart from south east to north west. This is constructed from the same granite as parts of the hillfort certainly reusing some stone from the monument. (7)(8)



Sources :
Source Number : 1
Source : Ordnance Survey Map (Scale / Date)
Source details : OS 6" 1963
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Source Number : 2
Source : VIRTUAL CATALOGUE ENTRY TO SUPPORT NAR MIGRATION
Source details : Problems of the IA in S Britain 1961 57 (S Frere)
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Source Number : 3
Source : VIRTUAL CATALOGUE ENTRY TO SUPPORT NAR MIGRATION
Source details : VCH Devon 1 1906 597 plan (J C Wall)
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Source Number : 4
Source : Field Investigators Comments
Source details : F1 VM 08-May-1953
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Source Number : 5
Source : Field Investigators Comments
Source details : F2 NVQ 07-Jul-1979
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Source Number : 6
Source : VIRTUAL CATALOGUE ENTRY TO SUPPORT NAR MIGRATION
Source details : Silvester R J and Quinnell N V 'Unfinished Hillforts on the DEvon Moors' Proc Devon Archaeol Soc 51 17-31.
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Source Number : 7
Source : Field Investigators Comments
Source details : Moore B & Newman P, EH Archaeological Investigation 18-AUG-2004
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Source Number : 8
Source : VIRTUAL CATALOGUE ENTRY TO SUPPORT NAR MIGRATION
Source details : Moore B 2005 Hunter's Tor Hillfort, Lustleigh, Devon: An Earthwork Survey (EH AI report series AI/09/2005)
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Monument Types:
Monument Period Name : Iron Age
Display Date : Iron Age
Monument End Date : 43
Monument Start Date : -800
Monument Type : Hillfort
Evidence : Earthwork

Components and Objects:
Related Records from other datasets:
External Cross Reference Source : Scheduled Monument Legacy (County No.)
External Cross Reference Number : DV 279
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : SMR Number (Devonshire)
External Cross Reference Number : SX 78 SE 2
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : National Monuments Record Number
External Cross Reference Number : SX 78 SE 2
External Cross Reference Notes :

Related Warden Records :
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