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Calverley Old Hall

Hob Uid: 51381
Location :
Leeds
Non Civil Parish
Grid Ref : SE2079536875
Summary : Manor house, now a series of separate dwellings, which developed between the 15th and the 18th centuries. The site was probably occupied from the early 12th century but the earliest surviving structure was built as a timber framed solar wing in the early 15th century. The stone-built chapel adjoining this wing pre-dates 1488 and contains a timber framed gallery, designed for the family of the house, and accessed from the solar. The great hall adjoins the solar on the opposite side. It dates from the late 15th century (dendro dated 1485-95). In the mid 16th century, a chamber block was built to the rear of the chapel. The timber framed wing was encased in stone circa 1630 and the north wing added circa 1650. In the early 18th century the roof was raised and the open hall floored. The Calverley family moved to Esholt Hall at around this time and the house was later sold and subdivided to form separate dwellings. Cottages were built against the earlier walls in the 19th century. The building is now owned by the Landmark Trust.
More information : (SE 20803687 - O.S 1/2500, 1967)

II* No. 14 and Nos. 20, 22 and 24 Woodhall Road, known as Calverley Old Hall Calverly

One building of irregular plan comprising C15, C16 and C17 features. Stone built with stone slate roof. No. 14 and No. 20 comprise a rectangular block with 2 storeys, 4 and 5 light stone mullion windows, a blocked 2 light Perpendicular window with trefoil headed lights and some blocked arched entrances. The house next has projecting gable with a large 8 light stone mullion and transom window on 1st floor. No. 24 projects out at right angles, and has ashlar facade with some remains of blocked window tracery. This house is traditionally considered to be the scene of the attempted murder of his wife and children by Walter Calverley in 1605 for which he was executed. It is the subject of the contemporary play 'A' Yorkshire Tragedy' sometimes attributed to Shakespeare. (1)

SE 207 368. Calverley Hall, Calverley.

`J Sugden and D J H Michelmore recording for W Yorkshire County Archaeological Unit report that the site was probably the seat of the Scot family from the early 12th century, but the earliest standing structure is a four-bay timber-framed solar wing of the 15th century. This is of two stories, with cambered tie-beams having carved knee-braces to the wall-posts. It was originally heated by an external stone stack on its W side topped by an octagonal stone chimney. The roof has been rebuilt reusing medieval rafters. The two W bays of the six-bay stone hall were probably rebuilt in the post-medieval period, masking its original relationship with the solar. Its roof, spanning c8.5m, is of arched-braced construction supported on hammer-beams. Two of its original two-light windows survive; it was heated by a massive external stack on its N side. On the oppposite, W side of the solar is a four-bay stone chapel or lesser hall. The roof is constructed in the same way as that of the hall, but has a span of only c4.5m. Two original two-light windows and a piscina survive. This wing is at present divided centrally at first-floor level by an openwork screen, which is probably connected with its use as a chapel in the post-medieval period. The design of the roofs of the hall and chapel indicates that they are contemporary and of the mid 15th century. In the angle between th N end of the chapel and the solar is a single-bay two-storey chamber block of timber-framed construction in the Pennine tradition.' (2)

Additional reference. (3)

Manor house, now a series of separate dwellings, which developed between the 15th and the 18th centuries. The site was probably occupied from the early 12th century but the earliest surviving structure was built as a timber framed solar wing in the early 15th century. The stone-built chapel adjoining this wing pre-dates 1488 and contains a timber framed gallery, designed for the family of the house, and accessed from the solar. The great hall adjoins the solar on the opposite side. It dates from the late 15th century (dendro dated 1485-95). In the mid 16th century, a chamber block was built to the rear of the chapel. The timber framed wing was encased in stone circa 1630 and the north wing added circa 1650. In the early 18th century the roof was raised and the open hall floored. The Calverley family moved to Esholt Hall at around this time and the house was later sold and subdivided to form separate dwellings. Cottages were built against the earlier walls in the 19th century. The building is now owned by the Landmark Trust. Listed Grade I. (4, 5)

Sources :
Source Number : 1
Source : List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest
Source details : DOE(HHR) Borough of Pudsey, Yorks, W.R, June 1965,1
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Source Number : 2
Source : Medieval archaeology : journal of the Society for Medieval Archaeology
Source details : Med Archaeol 22 1978 182
Page(s) : 182
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) : 22
Source Number : 3
Source : The Yorkshire archaeological journal
Source details : Yorks Archaeol J 1978 12 (S Moorhouse)
Page(s) : 12
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) :
Source Number : 4
Source : List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest
Source details : 17-Jun-86
Page(s) :
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) :
Source Number : 5
Source : Greater medieval houses of England and Wales 1300-1500, volume 1 : northern England
Source details :
Page(s) : 321-323
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) :

Monument Types:
Monument Period Name : Medieval
Display Date : Pre 1488
Monument End Date : 1488
Monument Start Date :
Monument Type : Manorial Chapel
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Medieval
Display Date : From early C12
Monument End Date : 1132
Monument Start Date : 1100
Monument Type : Manor House
Evidence : Documentary Evidence
Monument Period Name : Medieval
Display Date : Early C15
Monument End Date : 1432
Monument Start Date : 1400
Monument Type : Manor House, Timber Framed House
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Medieval
Display Date : Late C15
Monument End Date : 1499
Monument Start Date : 1467
Monument Type : Great Hall, Open Hall House, Manor House
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Post Medieval
Display Date : c1630
Monument End Date : 1640
Monument Start Date : 1620
Monument Type : Manor House
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Post Medieval
Display Date : c1650
Monument End Date : 1660
Monument Start Date : 1640
Monument Type : Manor House
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Post Medieval
Display Date : Early C18
Monument End Date : 1732
Monument Start Date : 1700
Monument Type : Manor House
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Post Medieval
Display Date : After 1754
Monument End Date :
Monument Start Date : 1754
Monument Type : House
Evidence : Extant Building

Components and Objects:
Related Records from other datasets:
External Cross Reference Source : Listed Building List Entry Legacy Uid
External Cross Reference Number : 423424
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : NBR Index Number
External Cross Reference Number : 31310
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : NBR Index Number
External Cross Reference Number : 111682
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : National Monuments Record Number
External Cross Reference Number : SE 23 NW 20
External Cross Reference Notes :

Related Warden Records :
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