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Historic England Research Records

St Charles Centre For Health And Wellbeing

Hob Uid: 1454621
Location :
Greater London Authority
Kensington and Chelsea
Non Civil Parish
Grid Ref : TQ2375181879
Summary : The hospital on this site was built as St. Marylebone Infirmary between 1879 and 1881, accommodating 744 patients. The architect was Henry Saxon Snell, who received a letter from Florence Nightingale after the much publicised opening and opened on 29th June 1881 by the Prince and Princess of Wales. At the time it relieved pressure on the overcrowded Marylebone Workhouse. The infirmary was designed on a pavilion plan with three storey, double pavilion blocks to either side of a central corridor. It was built in yellow stock brick in 'Guardian's Gothic' style with minimal use of stone dressings and a slate roof. Four double pavilions were arranged symmetrically on a north-south axis with two each side of the centre range. The centre range provided an administrative block, kitchen, stores and services. It was fronted by a detached entrance block, which had an archway going through the centre with a chapel above. The complex was dominated by a water tower, at the north end of the centre range. It was 182 feet tall and was fed by an artesian well 500 feet deep. Externally there were stone corbels, vertical banded decoration, stone cornices, lancet louvres treated as dormers in aediculed brick surrounds and a pyramidal roof. A nurses' home was added in 1884. It was built using the same materials in a similar style to the other infirmary buildings. It had a two-storey entrance bay flanked by three-storey wings. These ended in four-storey towers with dormers mirroring the ventilating louvres of the infirmary. It is the oldest surviving nurses' home established by the Nightingale Fund for the training of nurses in Poor Law hospitals. In 1922, the infirmary was renamed St. Marylebone Hospital; in 1930 it was taken over by the London County Council and became St. Charles' Hospital, transferring to the National Health Service in 1948. Around 2012 it was renamed the St. Charles Centre for Health and Wellbeing. The buildings, including the nurses' home, are Grade II listed.
More information : The hospital on this site was built as St. Marylebone Infirmary between 1879 and 1881, accommodating 744 patients. The architect was Henry Saxon Snell, who received a letter from Florence Nightingale after the much publicised opening and opened on 29th June 1881 by the Prince and Princess of Wales. At the time it relieved pressure on the overcrowded Marylebone Workhouse. The infirmary was designed on a pavilion plan with three storey, double pavilion blocks to either side of a central corridor. It was built in yellow stock brick in 'Guardian's Gothic' style with minimal use of stone dressings and a slate roof. Four double pavilions were arranged symmetrically on a north-south axis with two each side of the centre range. The centre range provided an administrative block, kitchen, stores and services. It was fronted by a detached entrance block, which had an archway going through the centre with a chapel above. The complex was dominated by a water tower, at the north end of the centre range. It was 182 feet tall and was fed by an artesian well 500 feet deep. Externally there were stone corbels, vertical banded decoration, stone cornices, lancet louvres treated as dormers in aediculed brick surrounds and a pyramidal roof. A nurses' home was added in 1884. It was built using the same materials in a similar style to the other infirmary buildings. It had a two-storey entrance bay flanked by three-storey wings. These ended in four-storey towers with dormers mirroring the ventilating louvres of the infirmary. It is the oldest surviving nurses' home established by the Nightingale Fund for the training of nurses in Poor Law hospitals. In 1922, the infirmary was renamed St. Marylebone Hospital; in 1930 it was taken over by the London County Council and became St. Charles' Hospital, transferring to the National Health Service in 1948. The buildings, including the nurses' home, are Grade II listed. [1-7]

Around 2012 renamed the St. Charles Centre for Health and Wellbeing, and also offers palliative care services. (8)(9)

Sources :
Source Number : 1
Source : Oral information, correspondence (not archived) or staff comments
Source details : Uncatalogued NMR Archive File - Workhouses 101110
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Source Number : 2
Source : World Wide Web page
Source details : Higginbotham, Peter. 2006. The Workhouse. < http://www.workhouses.org.uk/ > [Accessed 02-MAY-2007]
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Source Number : 3
Source : The Workhouse: a study of Poor Law Buildings in England
Source details :
Page(s) : 166-167, 216
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Source Number : 4
Source : List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest
Source details : KENSINGTON AND CHELSEA, 10-JAN-1995
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Source Number : 5
Source : Ordnance Survey Map (Scale / Date)
Source details : 1:2500, 1870
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Source Number : 6
Source : Ordnance Survey Map (Scale / Date)
Source details : 1:2500, 1896
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Source Number : 7
Source : Ordnance Survey Map (Scale / Date)
Source details : 1:2500, 1916
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Source Number : 8
Source : Oral information, correspondence (not archived) or staff comments
Source details : Ex. inf. member of the public through correspondence on the PastScape website, 07-APR-2014
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Source Number : 9
Source : World Wide Web page
Source details : < http://www.clch.nhs.uk/locations/st-charles-centre-for-health-and-wellbeing.aspx > accessed on 09-APR-2014
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Monument Types:
Monument Period Name : Victorian
Display Date : Built between 1879 and 1881
Monument End Date : 1881
Monument Start Date : 1879
Monument Type : Infirmary, Pavilion Ward Block, Office, Kitchen, Chapel, Water Tower, Mortuary
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Victorian
Display Date : Nurses home added 1884
Monument End Date : 1884
Monument Start Date : 1884
Monument Type : Infirmary, Pavilion Ward Block, Office, Kitchen, Chapel, Water Tower, Mortuary, Nurses Hostel
Evidence : Extant Building
Monument Period Name : Early 20th Century
Display Date : Change of use in 1923
Monument End Date : 1923
Monument Start Date : 1923
Monument Type : Nurses Hostel, Hospital
Evidence : Extant Building

Components and Objects:
Related Records from other datasets:
External Cross Reference Source : NBR Index Number
External Cross Reference Number : 101110
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : Listed Building List Entry Legacy Uid
External Cross Reference Number : 425888
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : Listed Building List Entry Legacy Uid
External Cross Reference Number : 425889
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : Unified Designation System UID
External Cross Reference Number : 1235251
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : National Monuments Record Number
External Cross Reference Number : TQ 28 SW 109
External Cross Reference Notes :

Related Warden Records :
Associated Monuments : 1454454
Relationship type : General association

Related Activities :
Associated Activities : Primary, RCHME: WORKHOUSES PROJECT
Activity type : ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY
Start Date : 1991-01-01
End Date : 1994-12-31
Associated Activities : Primary, INVESTIGATION BY RCHME/EH ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY
Activity type : ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY
Start Date : 1995-11-14
End Date : 1995-11-14