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Historic England Research Records

Chapel Of St James The Apostle

Hob Uid: 384896
Location :
Suffolk
Babergh
Lindsey
Grid Ref : TL9778044380
Summary : The Chapel of St James the Apostle in Lindsey, Suffolk, dates to the 13th century and was built to serve the nearby Castle of Lindsey. It had probably been built by 1240 since it was in that year that the churches of Kersey and Lindsey were given to Kersey Priory by Nesta de Cockfield. Two years later she also imposed a tithe on parts of Cockfield in order that the chapel would be lit continuously. While Lindsey Castle was abandoned before the end of the 13th century, the chapel remained in use. It was repaired in the 15th or early 16th centuries and works included the lowering of the roof and possibly the shortening of the chapel in length. It was in use as a chapel until 1547 when it was one of the 'free' chapels to be dissolved. Following its dissolution, the king granted the chapel to Thomas Turner and it was used as a barn until 1930. The chapel is in the guardianship of English Heritage.
More information : (TL 97784438) Chapel (NR) (1)

Chapel of St James built about 1250 and said to have belonged to a monastery which occupied the site of Chapel farmhouse and buildings. It was once used as a barn but is now restored. Grade 1. Th rear wing of the farmhouse is said to have been built from some of the ruins of the monastery. Grade 2. (2)

The Chapel, now in the care of the Department of the Environment, is in a good state of preservation and open to the public at certain times of the year. See photograph. The rear wing of the adjacent farmhouse appears to be of 16th century timber frame construction rendered over; the remainder mainly dates to the 19th century and there is no evidence to suggest that any monastic material is included in the building.

The likelihood of this being a monastic site seems remote (perambulation of the area produced no finds to indicate
substantial buildings or occupation) but there is an Augustinian Priory two kilometers to the east (TL 94 SE 1) which may refer.Published 1:2500 survey correct. (3)

The earliest parts of the Chapel of St James the Apostle date to the 13th century however it contains reused stones from an earlier period. It is thought that it was built to serve the nearby Castle of Lindsey to the south east. It had probably been built by 1240 since it was in that year that the churches of Kersey and Lindsey were given to Kersey Priory by Nesta de Cockfield. Two years later she also imposed a tithe on parts of Cockfield in order that the chapel would be lit continuously. While Lindsey Castle was abandoned before the end of the 13th century, the chapel remained in use. It was repaired in the 15th or early 16th centuries and works included the lowering of the roof and possibly the shortening of the chapel in length. It was in use as a chapel until 1547 when it was one of the 'free' chapels to be dissolved. Following its dissolution, the king granted the chapel to Thomas Turner and it was used as a barn until 1930. See source for further details. (4)

In 2002, an attempt was made to carry out tree-ring analysis of the chapel's roof timbers so as to acquire a precise date of construction. This report states that the samples contained insufficient rings and were therefore undateable. See report for details as well as a measured drawings of a cross section of the chapel and its south elevation. (5)

Sources :
Source Number : 1
Source : Ordnance Survey Map (Scale / Date)
Source details : OS 6" 1958
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Figs. :
Plates :
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Source Number : 2
Source : List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest
Source details : Babergh, 10-JUL-1980
Page(s) : 257
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) : 966
Source Number : 3
Source : Field Investigators Comments
Source details : F1 GJM 14-DEC-79
Page(s) :
Figs. :
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Source Number : 4
Source : Heritage Unlocked: Guide to free sites in the East of England
Source details :
Page(s) : 88-89
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) :
Source Number : 5
Source : Tree-Ring Analysis of Timbers from the Chapel of St James, Kersey Road, Rose Green, Lindsey, Suffolk
Source details :
Page(s) : 1
Figs. :
Plates :
Vol(s) :

Monument Types:
Components and Objects:
Related Records from other datasets:
External Cross Reference Source : Scheduled Monument Legacy (County No.)
External Cross Reference Number : SF 19
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : Listed Building List Entry Legacy Uid
External Cross Reference Number : 276882
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : EH Property Number
External Cross Reference Number : 32
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : National Monuments Record Number
External Cross Reference Number : TL 94 SE 19
External Cross Reference Notes :

Related Warden Records :
Associated Monuments : 384905
Relationship type : General association

Related Activities :
Associated Activities : Primary, FIELD OBSERVATION ON TL 94 SE 19
Activity type : FIELD OBSERVATION (VISUAL ASSESSMENT)
Start Date : 1979-12-14
End Date : 1979-12-14
Associated Activities : Primary, CHAPEL OF ST. JAMES, ROSE GREEN
Activity type : ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY
Start Date : 2002-01-01
End Date : 2002-12-31