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Historic England Research Records

King Henry Viiis Mound

Hob Uid: 398012
Location :
Greater London Authority
Richmond upon Thames
Non Civil Parish
Grid Ref : TQ1860073150
Summary : Mound in Richmond Park situated on and over the edge of a steep slope down to the River Thames. It comprises a circular flat-topped mound 72 metres metres in diameter, and 6.1 metres high. The mound is cut by terraced paths which lead to the viewing platform on top, where a keyhole view extending to St Paul's Cathedral is now a protected vista. Earthworks on the eastern side of the mound suggest a slight, curved ramp leading to the top of the feature. A tree-lined ornamental avenue (TQ 17 SE 61) was aligned between King Henry VIII's Mound and Oliver's Mound (TQ 17 SE 19) during the 18th century, and it is likely that the possible ramp led onto this avenue, and that King Henry VIII's Mound, with its views, was the culmination of a formal walk. The origins of King Henry VIII's Mound are unclear, and it is possible that it was a prehistoric round barrow which also served as a standing for the hunt when Richmond Park was a deer park. It was then became an ornamental garden feature during the early 18th century. The site was surveyed by RCHME field staff in 1995.
More information : [TQ 1860 7325] KING HENRY VIII MOUND [GT]

Might well be a castle mound, but in its present state difficult to say. Traces of bank and ditch (wide) from it to reservoir ditch on south.

This bowl-shaped mound is situated in the private grounds of Pembroke Lodge. It is 30-40 yards in diam and about 8ft. high. The mound is generally called 'KING HENRY VIII MOUND' or MOUNT, but was marked as 'THE KING'S STANDINGE' on a plan of 1637. It has been claimed as a barrow, and considerable deposits of ashes are said to have been found in it. The finding of ashes however, does not prove the mound is a barrow, and its nature must be regarded as doubtful.
Tradition has it the Henry VIII stood on the mound to watch for a signal from the Tower of London announcing the execution of his Wife Anne Boleyn.

King Henry VIII mound stands overlooking a steep W. slope dropping down to the R.Thames. It has been mutilated by ornamental gardening, but consists of a circular flat-topped mound some 36.0m in diameter by 2.7m in height. On its N.E. side there is an apparent causeway across a slight ditch, but the ditch noted by Crawford is no longer visible.
It is rather large for a barrow and rather small for a motte; it could be a mill mound but is more likely to be an early form of ornamental gardening, perhaps at sometime supporting a belvedere or summer house. It is interesting to note that a broad raised track in Sidmouth Wood leads from Oliver's mound, now removed, (see TQ 17 S.E. 19) in a direct line with the causeway on King Henry VIII mound.
GP AO/65/228/6.
Published 1/1250 revised.

(1-4)

Mound, 72.0m in diameter and a maximum of 6.1m high. The mound is situated on and over the edge of a steep slope down to the River Thames, and it is this which accentuates both the diameter and height of the feature. The mound is cut by terraced paths which lead to the viewing platform on top, where a keyhole view extending to St Paul's Cathedral is now a protected vista. Earthworks on the eastern side of the mound suggest a slight, curved ramp leading to the top of the feature. A tree-lined ornamental avenue (TQ 17 SE 61) was aligned between King Henry VIII's Mound and Oliver's Mound (TQ 17 SE 19) during the 18th century (6a), and it is likely that the possible ramp led onto this avenue, and that King Henry VIII's Mound, with its excellent views, was the culmination of a formal walk. The origins of King Henry VIII's Mound are unclear, and it is possible that it was a prehistoric round barrow. It may also have served as a standing for the hunt when Richmond Park was a working deer park. What is clear is that it became an ornamental garden feature and was incorporated in the early 18th century into Petersham Park and later into Richmond Park. The mound was surveyed by the RCHME in January 1995 during the Royal Parks Project. See archive report and survey plan at 1:500 scale, and survey plan of Petersham Park (TQ 17 SE 62) at 1:1000 scale. (5)

Sources :
Source Number : 1
Source : Ordnance Survey Map (Scale / Date)
Source details : OS 6" 1933-38.
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Source Number : 2
Source : Oral information, correspondence (not archived) or staff comments
Source details : Rec 6" (O.G.S. Crawford 29.5.1925).
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Source : Richmond Park
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Source Number : 3
Source : Surrey archaeological collections : relating to the history and antiquities of the County
Source details : L.V.Grinsell
Page(s) : 31,34
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Vol(s) : 42, 1934
Source Number : 3a
Source : VIRTUAL CATALOGUE ENTRY TO SUPPORT NAR MIGRATION
Source details : Cundall H M. 1925. Bygone Richmond, 32-33
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Source Number : 4
Source : Field Investigators Comments
Source details : F1 FGA 07-JAN-66
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Source Number : 5
Source : VIRTUAL CATALOGUE ENTRY TO SUPPORT NAR MIGRATION
Source details : RCHME: ROYAL PARKS PROJECT: Richmond Park Survey
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Source Number : 5a
Source : VIRTUAL CATALOGUE ENTRY TO SUPPORT NAR MIGRATION
Source details : Rocque J. 1741-45. An Exact Survey of the Citys of London...'
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Source Number : 6
Source : Register of parks and gardens of special historic interest in England
Source details : Greater London
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Vol(s) : Part 17
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Source : Richmond Park, King Henry VIII's Mound/ink survey
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Source : Richmond Park, King Henry VIII's Mound/pencil survey
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Monument Types:
Monument Period Name : Prehistoric
Display Date : Prehistoric
Monument End Date : 43
Monument Start Date : -500000
Monument Type : Round Barrow
Evidence : Conjectural Evidence
Monument Period Name : Post Medieval
Display Date : Created after 1637
Monument End Date :
Monument Start Date : 1637
Monument Type : Prospect Mound
Evidence : Earthwork
Monument Period Name : Post Medieval
Display Date : Early C18
Monument End Date : 1732
Monument Start Date : 1700
Monument Type : Belvedere, Prospect Mound
Evidence : Earthwork

Components and Objects:
Related Records from other datasets:
External Cross Reference Source : SMR Number (Greater London)
External Cross Reference Number : 21080
External Cross Reference Notes :
External Cross Reference Source : National Monuments Record Number
External Cross Reference Number : TQ 17 SE 21
External Cross Reference Notes :

Related Warden Records :
Associated Monuments : 398006
Relationship type : General association
Associated Monuments : 1024280
Relationship type : General association
Associated Monuments : 1024285
Relationship type : General association

Related Activities :
Associated Activities : Primary, FIELD OBSERVATION ON TQ 17 SE 21
Activity type : FIELD OBSERVATION (VISUAL ASSESSMENT)
Start Date : 1966-01-07
End Date : 1966-01-07
Associated Activities : Primary, RCHME: ROYAL PARKS PROJECT: RICHMOND PARK SURVEY
Activity type : MEASURED SURVEY
Start Date : 1995-01-01
End Date : 1995-09-01