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Name:Medieval/post-medieval buildings and gardens, The Moats
HER Ref:MLE2905
Parish:Stoke Golding, Hinckley and Bosworth, Leicestershire
Grid Reference:SP 397 969
Map:Coming soon

Monument Types

  • BUILDING (Late Medieval to Late Post-medieval - 1350 AD? to 1700 AD?)
  • GARDEN (Early Post-medieval - 1540 AD to 1699 AD)

Summary

The site is Scheduled as a medieval farmstead. Earthwork survey in the 1980s noted areas of old buildings and levelled terraces, apparently a 'fairly typical manorial garden of the 16th or 17th century'.

Additional Information

Scheduled Monument description:
The monument is situated on the south-western outskirts of Stoke Golding and includes the earthwork and buried remains of a Saxon burial mound and a medieval farmstead. The farmstead lay within a rectangular enclosure, bounded to the west and along much of the southern and northern sides, by banks and ditches. The southern ditch, which has been recut, and the eastern boundary, which is no longer evident, are not included in the scheduling. In the south-eastern quarter of the site is a slightly raised, square platform, believed to represent the site of the medieval farmhouse. Although the building itself is not visible on the surface its buried remains will provide evidence for the plan of the house. To the west and north-west of the platform are several small closes which are defined by low banks and drainage channels, whilst to the south are the remains of a pair of linear ponds, now seasonally waterfilled. In the northern part of the monument are the earthwork remains of an Anglo-Saxon burial mound (a hlaew). It stands approximately 2m high and is 14m in diameter. Although no longer visible at ground level, a ditch, from which material was quarried during the construction of the hlaew, surrounds the mound. This has become infilled over the years but survives as a buried feature, approximately 3m wide. The mound was partly excavated in the 1930s and pottery fragments and the enamelled escutcheons from a 7th century hanging bowl were recovered. All fence posts are excluded from the scheduling, although the ground beneath these features is included.

Pastscape describes this site as a medieval farmstead, "The monument includes the earthwork and buried remains of a medieval farmstead. The farmstead lay within a rectangular enclosure, bounded to the west and along much of its northern and southern sides by banks and ditches. In the south eastern quarter of the site is a slightly raised, square platform, believed to represent the site of the medieval farmhouse. Although the building itself is not visible on the surface its buried remains will provide evidence for the plan of the house. To the west and north west of the platform are several small closes which are defined by low banks and drainage channels, whilst to the south are the remains of a pair of linear ponds, now seasonally waterfilled."


<1> Hartley R F, 2008, Medieval Earthworks of South-West Leicestershire (Hinckley & Bosworth), p63-64 (Bibliographic reference). SLE1014.

"In the south-west corner of the village are earthwork remains of two fish ponds. These are called 'The Moats' and extend along the southern side of a field which was called the 'Park' on old maps. Within it are traces of the sites of old buildings and levelled terraces. This appears to be a fairly typical manorial garden of the 16th or 17th century. North of the fishponds is a mound, apparently a prospect mound. However its origins may be much older, as it was dug into years ago and part of an Anglo-Saxon hanging bowl was discovered. 150 metres to the north is another mound, with the site of a summer house nearby, indicating that there was a substantial garden in this area as well."

<2> McAree, D, 2010, Archaeological watching brief on land at Park House, Stoke Golding, Leicestershire (Unpublished document). SLE3095.

A very small trench dug for cabling was watched in 2010 but no finds/features were recorded.

Sources

<1>Bibliographic reference: Hartley R F. 2008. Medieval Earthworks of South-West Leicestershire (Hinckley & Bosworth). p63-64.
<2>Unpublished document: McAree, D. 2010. Archaeological watching brief on land at Park House, Stoke Golding, Leicestershire.

Associated Finds

    None recorded

Designations

  • Conservation Area: Stoke Golding
  • Scheduled Monument 1017678: HLAEW AND MEDIEVAL FARMSTEAD IMMEDIATELY SOUTH WEST OF PARK HOUSE

Images

The Moats, Stoke Golding  © LCC

The Moats, Stoke Golding © LCC

Medieval/post-medieval moat/fishponds, buildings and gardens  © Leicestershire County Council

Medieval/post-medieval moat/fishponds, buildings and gardens © Leicestershire County Council